We are committed to developing a generation of leaders who use the power of the law to make a difference in our communities and the world.

Which means we aim for more than simply teaching about how to make a difference. We also strive to live it every day on campus and in our community. 

It's in small things: like compostable toilets, a solar-powered electric-car charger, and a cafeteria where most of the food is local and organic.

It's also in the big things. Nearly every building on campus has been repurposed from its original use as a New England school or home into a building that serves a 21st century school, and many of them are award-winning historic preservation efforts that are also models of energy efficiency.

It's also in our principles. Vermont Law was one of only two law schools nationwide to not only actively protest "Don't Ask, Don't Tell" policy on gays serving in the military, and to lose $300,000-$500,000 per year in federal funds between 1999 and 2011 for doing so.

It's also in how we think about community.  When we opened our poverty law clinic in 1979, we named it after the town in which we live and work: The South Royalton Legal Clinic. And when Tropical Storm Irene ravaged most of Vermont, including neighbors and farmers in South Royalton, we cancelled classes and organized a volunteer effort that last for months, not just days.

Join us.