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NALSA Symposium 2022: Indigenous Representation in the Law

22 Apr 2022

NALSA Symposium 2022: Indigenous Representation in the Law

4:00pm - 6:00pm

Chase Community Center and via Livestream

Native American Law Students Association (NALSA), in partnership with the Food and Agriculture Law Society (FALS),  will be co-hosting this in Chase Center, on-campus, as well as streaming LIVE via Zoom and YouTube. Register in advance if you would like to participate online or attend in person (so we can assess food/chairs, and so on). Please register if you would like to participate online, to pose questions and have access to the online chat features. You will be emailed a link to the Zoom event with times/date as a reminder.

Register here !

If you'd only prefer to watch the event live, you can watch online, live, at the event time without registering.

Watch Live here !

Learn from Indigenous lawyers from diverse backgrounds and locations on the importance of Indigenous representation in the legal field. Speakers include Patrick Anderson, one of four Alaska Native attorney members living in Alaska when he joined the Bar in 1978 and whose work focuses on rural Alaskan communities and reducing childhood trauma; Frank Bibeau, an enrolled member and tribal attorney for the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe who is currently representing Honor the Earth to defend the rights of nature against the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline and the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission; and Hillary Renick, the tribal liason coordinator at the Bureau of Ocean Energy Management, U.S. Department of the Interior.

Photograph of Patrick AndersonPatrick Anderson, Alaska Native, Tribal Attorney

Patrick Anderson, one of four Alaska Native attorney members living in Alaska when he joined the Bar in 1978, focuses his work on rural Alaskan communities and reducing childhood trauma.

Photograph of Frank BibeauFrank Bibeau, Attorney for While Earth Band of Ojibwe and Honor the Earth

Frank Bibeau, an enrolled member and tribal attorney for the Leech Lake Band of Ojibwe, is currently representing Honor the Earth to defend the rights of nature against the Enbridge Line 3 pipeline and the Minnesota Public Utilities Commission

Photograph of Hillary RenickHillary Renick, Tribal Liason Coordinator, Bureau of Ocean Energy Management

As Bureau of Ocean Energy Management (BOEM) Tribal Liaison Coordinator, Hillary Renick advises BOEM leadership on implementing tribal consultation policies through formal and informal dialogue, collaboration, and engagement.

Hillary is an enrolled member of the Sherwood Valley Band of Pomo Indians and descendant of the Hopland Shanel, Noyo River and Ft. McDermitt Paiute-Shoshone communities. Hillary received her BA in Anthropology from American University in Washington, DC; studied Public Health at George Washington University researching Native American health problems associated with exposure to agricultural pesticides, while studying data associated with artifact repatriation; MS in Cultural Resource Management successfully defending her Master’s Thesis on Yakama Indian Treaty Fishing and Significance of Traditional Place; JD from the University of the Oregon School of Law, with certificates of completion in Environmental and Natural Resources, Ocean and Coastal Law, Pro Bono, and Public Service; LLM from the University of Arkansas School of Law Indigenous Food Initiative writing about subsistence and traditional foods.

Hillary has over twenty-five years of service to the federal government and tribal communities.

Photograph of Alanna Ojibway Alanna Ojibway, Program Manager National Center on Restorative Justice, Center for Justice Reform, Vermont Law School

 

 

 

Questions? Concerns? Contact Benjamin Gray at benjamingray@vermontlaw.edu