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Energy

This section of the VLS blog features posts about energy law, energy use and production, regulation and more. From stories on the Institute for Energy and the Environment (IEE) to opnions on the latest bills proposed by this current administration, stay informed on energy news.

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January 26, 2021

Dr. Tade Oyewunmi is a Vermont Law School assistant professor and senior research fellow in energy law and policy. His teaching and research focuses on policies and regulation of natural gas and electricity markets, international energy and resources law, decarbonization and energy transitions, energy justice, and regulation of network-based industries.  

Recently Dr. Tade Oyewunmi gave us some insight into his newest book project, …

Vermont Law School recently caught up with Amber Widmayer LLM'17 to discuss why she chose VLS in general, and the LLM in Energy Law specifically, and what she is up to now.

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October 6, 2020
Jonathan Willson MERL'15 explains why he chose Vermont Law School.
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May 26, 2020
Explore why and how Vermont Law School leads the state in offering commercial EV charging access.
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October 2, 2018
The Energy Clinic and student clinicians worked with Mascoma Meadows, a resident-owned community in Lebanon, NH this summer. Their work focused on a 100kW low income community solar project and commercial and community solar projects in Randolph and South Royalton, VT
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May 18, 2018
The Institute for Energy and the Environment has added two new international fellows to its team: Anna Butenko as Senior Fellow for European Energy Law and Policy, and Arturo Brandt as Senior Fellow for Latin American Climate and Energy Law and Policy.
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April 6, 2018
The Institute for Energy and the Environment at VLS led sixteen students and faculty members to learn about Cuban culture, and its legal system, and renewable energy law and policy.
April 6, 2017
As community solar projects become increasingly popular around the country, there’s a question that any potential participants should be askin​​​g: will our community actually own our solar power?​​