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Meet the Recipients of the Professional Certificate in Restorative Justice Scholarship

The Professional Certificate in Restorative Justice is a unique nine-credit program for graduate students, restorative justice leaders, state and non-profit managers, and other professionals who wish to develop a career focusing on restorative justice or gain skills in restorative practices. These four outstanding students have differing career and life journeys, but are united in a desire to transform their communities and their fields through restorative justice. 

Ebony Wiley-Campbell

Ebony Wiley-Campbell

Ebony Wiley-Campbell

I'm hype to have the opportunity to join Vermont Law School's efforts in furthering restorative justice. Equity initiatives have played a tremendous part in my personal, academic and professional growth over the course of fifteen years. I was a participant in three TRIO programs, all geared towards assisting students who will be the first in their families to graduate from college, students from underserved communities and/or students with disabilities. As a first-generation college graduate, first-generation professional and proud education advocate, I'm committed to transforming the lives of my students by supporting, sustaining and enhancing diversity and inclusion initiatives.

I aspire to revolutionize the way that educators think about their policies, procedures, community building and training to truly be student-centered and dismantle white supremacy. Additionally, I empower my communities and the ones I'm an accomplice to by decolonizing frameworks that don't support dignity or liberation. 

Love & Light.

 


Renae Griggs

Renae Griggs

Renae Griggs

I entered public service 36 years ago as a naïve, idealistic young woman searching for personal identity and professional purpose. While the majority of my colleagues who started the journey with me in 1985 have retired from public life and retreated into anonymity, I am driven by the knowledge that I have only just begun to fight for a more merciful and equitable system of justice. In fact, it is only in recent years I've come to appreciate the value of insight born from past mistakes and begun to experience the healing of drawing upon the well of wisdom that flows therein. 

So, at this stage, with a tad more humility, I begin again to seek understanding as to my place in this world and the contribution I am destined to make in the discovery of what it really means to love our neighbor as we love ourselves - especially in relation to traumatic harm, proportionate response, sustainable peace in resolving conflict, and human wholeness. There's much work to be done, so I carry on. Grateful.

 


Michelle Bos-Lun

Michelle Bos-Lun

Michelle Bos-Lun

Michelle Bos-Lun is a first term state representative in the Windham-4 district. She has lived in Westminster, Vermont since moving to Vermont to attend the School for International Training (SIT) in 2003 to pursue an MA in International Education. Before her election to the Statehouse, she worked as an educator in secondary classrooms and in youth leadership programs (including the Iraqi Young Leaders Exchange Program & Governor's Institute for Global Issues and Youth Action). She has also worked at the Brattleboro Community Justice Center as COSA/Reentry Coordinator with individuals recently released from incarceration in Vermont. She serves on the Corrections and Institutions Committee in the House of Representatives.

She has a strong interest in how people with marginalized identities are disproportionately represented in the criminal justice system, including those with mental health challenges. She hopes to help Vermont move towards a more just justice system. Michelle is a mother of three and grandmother of one. She is also an avid cook, gardener, canner and mushroom forager.

 


Amy Quinn

Amy Quinn

Amy Quinn

Amy Fisher Quinn lives in Lake Placid, New York with her husband, Andrew. She is a 1992 graduate of the College of the Holy Cross and a 1995 graduate of Western New England College School of Law. Since 2006, she has been employed by the New York State Unified Court System as the Principal Court Attorney in the chambers of the Hon. Richard B. Meyer, a multi-bench state level judge who presides over family court, county court, surrogate's court, and supreme court. As a result, she is involved with a wide variety of cases, including criminal, matrimonial, custody, child abuse and neglect, domestic violence, substance abuse treatment and estates and matrimonial matters. Amy assists with legal research, writing, calendar and case management, and conducts mediation and settlement conferences. Prior to that, she was an Assistant Essex County Attorney for Family Court and has experience both in private practice in Keene Valley, New York and Elizabethtown, New York and as assigned counsel to indigent clients.

She is proud to be the mother of Patrick, 22, and Kevin, 19. Amy is passionate about supporting women and girls locally and globally, as well as eradicating discrimination, intolerance and injustice towards all persons. Over the last year, she has helped to coordinate an alumni anti-racism alliance at Holy Cross, which has come to include a monthly virtual meet-up with speakers, discussion forums, and action steps.