2019 Spring Residential Classes

Students, please note:  CampusWeb is the authoritative source for class information, so please refer to CampusWeb when making final registration ​​decisions.​​​​​

ENV5105/Administrative Law

The goal of Administrative Law is to provide students with a working knowledge of the general principles of administrative law, a general knowledge of the workings of bureaucratic institutions, and an understanding of the critiques of government. The course examines the implementation of legislative policy through administrative agencies, including the role of administrative agencies in the governmental process, rule-making, adjudication, and judicial review of agency actions.

 

Professor(s)

Hillary Hoffmann

Semester

2019 Spring

WRI7360/Advanced Appellate Advocacy

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

CRI7305/Advanced Criminal Law Seminar

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9437/Advanced Energy Clinic

The Advanced Energy Clinic explores at an advanced level, the practical aspects of real world energy projects from the stage of conceptualization, development, contracting, financing, regulatory approval and construction. Students will be further exposed to the state and federal statutes, rules, tax codes, and ordinances that apply to the development of energy projects particularly those that promote sustainability at the community level. Students will also review and/or develop purchased power and other commercial agreements governing these projects.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9326/Advanced Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic

Advanced ENRLC provides students an opportunity to take the Clinic for a second semester and build on their previous ENRLC experiences. Students will further develop their understanding of relevant substantive law and the lawyering skills introduced in the initial Clinic course. They will be expected to take greater responsibility for counseling clients, developing cases, and reaching resolutions consistent with client goals. They will also be expected to help novice clinicians approach the work of the Clinic.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

RES7344/Advanced Legal Research

This seminar builds on the introduction to legal research course by expanding students’ knowledge of available resources and research strategies. The seminar covers topics such as statutory law including legislative history, administrative law, municipal law, and case law as well as secondary sources not covered in the introductory course. In the final weeks, the seminar reviews specialized resources for topics such as international law, tax law, and company research.

Professor(s)

Jane Woldow

Semester

2019 Spring

RES7355/Advanced Legal Research Practice (14 weeks)

This course will provide an opportunity to enhance knowledge of traditional legal research sources, both primary and secondary/practice related. Students will choose a desired practice area and jurisdiction and will be assigned a company or organization as their client. Students will conduct practice area specific research in the following areas: client background and development; litigation preparation; business and industry trends; and federal and state legislative and regulatory history.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9333 /Advanced South Royalton Legal Clinic - 13 Credits

Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians.

Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.

Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9339/Advanced South Royalton Legal Clinic - 6 Credits

Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians.

Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.

Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5344/Alternative Fuels & Renewable Energy

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

WRI7352/Bar Exam Skills & Tactics

Bar Exam Skills & Tactics (“BEST”) is a three-credit course designed to provide students with the analytical, test-taking, writing, and study skills that are critical to students' success on the bar exam. This is done through an intensive substantive and analytical review of subjects covered on the multistate bar exam, multistate essay exam, and multistate performance test. BEST is an interactive course in which students are expected to study independently, complete essay and multiple choice assignments, and create study tools to be used during bar study.

Professor(s)

Joe Brennan

Semester

2019 Spring

CRI7313/Capital Punishment Seminar

This seminar examines capital punishment as a legal process, using interdisciplinary materials and theory, litigation documents including briefs and recordings of oral arguments, and appellate opinions. The seminar also employs written narratives, movies, and popular cultural images and artifacts to explore this subject matter.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

REQ7105/Civil Procedure II

Professor(s)

Sean Nolon

Semester

2019 Spring

DIV7606 /Civil Rights Seminar

Professor(s)

Clara Gimenez

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5343/Climate Change Adaptions

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

GPP7810/Commercial Transactions

Advice to clients respecting commercial transactions, that is, as to binding agreements between parties of all sorts involving the transfer of goods and services, lies at the core of the private practice of law.  This course is an introduction to the negotiation, drafting, performance and enforcement of such agreements in a "real world" context, with a particular emphasis on the interpretation and understanding of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code, with at least a nod to U.C.C.

Professor(s)

Gary Brooks

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5122/Communications, Advocacy & Leadership

Professor(s)

Jared Carter

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5306/Comparative Environmental Law Research

This seminar is a research and writing seminar that will provide a framework and faculty supervision for students to engage in comparative environmental law research. While the seminar is designed primarily to support VLS students participating in the U.S.-Asia environmental law research projects, the seminar is sufficiently broad to accommodate students interested in researching the environmental law systems of other countries.

Professor(s)

Yanmei Lin

Semester

2019 Spring

REQ7112/Constitutional Law

Professor(s)

Peter Teachout, Greg Johnson

Semester

2019 Spring

BUS6235/Corporations and Other Business Assoc.

This course covers how to organize a business enterprise from a legal perspective. We compare the strengths and limitations of different structures for businesses, including sole-proprietorships, general partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. Supplementing the casebook, we learn about business financing, management and shareholder activism, by following in real-time the activities of ten large US corporations. We also study the law of agency, corporate governance and corporate social responsibility.

Professor(s)

Mark Latham

Semester

2019 Spring

REQ7140/Criminal Law

This course focuses on the foundation of our system of substantive criminal law, with emphasis upon mental state, responsibility, justification and excuse, inchoate crimes, and liability for the conduct of another.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

CRI7307/Criminal Practice & Procedure

The course will focus on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and the 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Students will examine the constitutional principles of criminal procedure and how those principles are actually utilized in practice. This course will give students the basic understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional criminal law and procedure while at the same time learning the practical application of theory to practice.

Professor(s)

Anna Saxman '85

Semester

2019 Spring

JUR7307/Culture and the Environment

To understand global environmental problems, environmental professionals and lawyers must study how different cultures and societies conceptualize and manage the environment. This interdisciplinary seminar will combine the study of cultural ecology, the cross-cultural study of the interaction of humans and the environment with legal anthropology, and the cross-cultural study of conflict. The first part of the course will examine the archaeological roots of the modern ecological degradation in the development of agriculture, urbanization and industrialization.

Professor(s)

Joan Vogel

Semester

2019 Spring

BUS6371/eLawyering: Cyber Security

Professor(s)

Jeannette Eicks

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9427/Energy Clinic

Through this course students will be introduced to the practical aspects of real world energy projects. Students will become involved in some aspect of the development or evaluation of sustainable energy projects and may have the opportunity to support the legal and policy requirements of a particular project or through the development of model legal documents to facilitate future projects. Current project areas include community solar development and other alternative energy systems.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5226/Energy Law & Policy

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5228/Energy Regulation & the Environment

Professor(s)

Kevin B. Jones

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9302/Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic

The Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic functions as a public interest environmental law firm with a collegial atmosphere that encourages interaction and feedback among students and Clinic faculty. Under the supervision of experienced environmental attorneys, student clinicians represent community groups and conservation organizations in real-world cases and projects.

Professor(s)

Jill Witkowski Heaps

Semester

2019 Spring

ADR6415/Environmental Dispute Resolution

Resolving environmental disputes is notoriously difficult. These conflicts involve multiple parties, complicated factual matters and typically resist simple solutions. In this course, students will explore these characteristics, investigate the full range of processes available to manage environmental disputes and assesses relevant policy and practical considerations of process selection. Over the course of the semester, we will compare the use of adversarial and collaborative processes in environmental disputes and explore the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches.

Professor(s)

Martha Judy

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5220/Environmental Economics & Markets

The course introduces students to environmental economics and exposes them to debates over the use of market-based instruments in environmental, energy, and climate policy. It also introduces students to basic concepts in economics and finance, examines key assumptions about market behavior and efficiency, and applies these ideas to environmental problems and actual case studies.

 

Professor(s)

Kevin B. Jones

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5305/Environmental Ethics Seminar

This seminar examines the values and ethical assumptions in problem solving about the environment, enabling students to perfect their reasoning about environmental law and policy. It introduces various ethical approaches to resolving environmental problems, including: intrinsic value, biocentrism, utilitarianism, eco-feminism, deep ecology, social ecology, eco-centric, and religious/spiritual.

Professor(s)

Reed Elizabeth Loder

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5229/Environmental Issues in Business Transactions

An exploration the types of environmental risks and issues that are commonly confronted in a variety of business-related transactions such as the acquisition of all of the stock of a company, asset purchases, real estate deals, leases and financings. Special focus on how the environmental issues in transactions are identified and managed in the course of a deal. The unique environmental issues associated with the purchase and redevelopment of contaminated properties or so-called Brownfield sites are also covered.

Professor(s)

Mark Latham

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5115 /Environmental Law

This course is an introduction to the law of pollution control, management of hazardous materials, and preservation of natural resources, with a particular emphasis on major federal environmental statutes, including the National Environmental Policy Act, Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, and Superfund.

Professor(s)

David B. Firestone

Semester

2019 Spring

FAM7711 /Estate Planning Practice Lab

Professor(s)

Gary Brooks

Semester

2019 Spring

FAM7710 /Estates

This course examines the statutory and judicial rules governing the gratuitous transfer of property. This includes transfers by gift, intestate succession, wills, trusts, and other non-probate mechanisms.

Professor(s)

Stephanie Willbanks

Semester

2019 Spring

RSJ7350/Ethics & Restorative Justice

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

LIT7210/Evidence

Considers the rules governing the admissibility of testimonial, physical, documentary, and demonstrative evidence in trials and other formal legal proceedings. Topics considered include relevance, prejudice, competency, hearsay, opinion, impeachment, and privilege.

Professor(s)

Mary Kay Lanthier

Semester

2019 Spring

LIT7211/Evidence Lab

Professor(s)

Mary Kay Lanthier, Elizabeth Kruska, Larry Novins

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9428/Food & Agriculture Clinic

Clinic: In the Food and Agriculture Clinic, students collaborate with local, regional, national and international partner organizations to develop and publicly disseminate law, policy and market tools that provide guidance to food system constituencies, including farmers, food entrepreneurs, consumers, legislators, and advocates, on how to advance law, policy and market initiatives that directly or indirectly promote (1) environmentally and economically sustainable agriculture, (2) public health, (3) food access and food security, (4) local and regional agriculture economies and (5) animal

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5380/Food Regulation and Policy

The modern food system, from farm to fork, has given rise to profound health, environmental, social, and cultural consequences. Considering these consequences as a series of law and policy issues, this course will address a host of topics: food safety, production, obesity, nutrition, sustainability, food deserts, labeling, marketing, trade, biotechnology, private standards and certification, and local food and the relationship between the state, local and federal governments regarding the regulations of food.

Professor(s)

Laurie Beyranevand '03

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5469/Gas & Oil Development & the Environment

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5478/Global Food Security & Social Justice

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

INT7415/Immigration Law

Covers the basics of immigration law; family and employment-based immigration categories; citizenship issues, grounds of inadmissibility/deportability; detention; removal and relief from removal. Special emphasis is placed on the immigration consequences of criminal convictions and humanitarian relief under asylum law and under the Violence Against Women Act.

 

Professor(s)

Erin Jacobsen

Semester

2019 Spring

BUS6255/Income Taxation

This course is an introduction to federal income taxation. Topics include: the concept of income; exclusions from income; deductions and credits available to individual non-business taxpayers and business taxpayers; sales and other dispositions of property; capital gains and losses; and tax policy. Class discussion focuses on applying the Internal Revenue Code and other legal authority to problems.

Professor(s)

Stephanie Willbanks

Semester

2019 Spring

BUS6260/Intellectual Property

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

LIT7318/Intensive Trial Practice

This course simulates the experience of preparing for trial under the supervision of experienced
trial lawyers. Students will prepare and perform the trial problem issued each November by the
prestigious Texas Young Lawyers’ Association National Trial Competition (TYLA). This
process will involve intensive review of the Federal Rules of Evidence and applicable trial
practice concepts, as well as significant factual analysis, focus, preparation and practice on one

Professor(s)

Larry Novins

Semester

2019 Spring

INT7424/International Human Rights

This seminar provides an introduction to international human rights law and procedures, and provides students with initial training in how to use the advocacy tools available in this field to make a difference in the community and the world. The course examines what are "human rights" and explores the law of treaty interpretation; how human rights law is incorporated into domestic legal systems; and the role of international governmental organizations, international and regional courts, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in protecting human rights.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

INT7425/International Law

This course provides an introduction to international law and the international legal system. Using real-world examples, it examines the processes through which international law is made, interpreted and applied, exploring the role of states as well as that of international bodies, non-governmental organizations, and corporations and other non-state actors. The application of international law in domestic legal systems is examined, as is the reach of domestic law in the international arena. Method of evaluation: Final exam and class participation.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

BUS6360/Introduction to eLawyering

This introductory course focuses on how new technologies affect the practice of law. Topics are segmented in to three discrete areas of study: Virtual Law Practice; Document Assembly and Expert Systems; and eDiscovery and Big Data. The virtual law practice section offers students a brief glimpse of the promise of virtual practice as well as the practical details and ethical considerations of setting up such a practice.

Professor(s)

Jeannette Eicks

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9425/JD Part-Time Externship

The Part-Time JD Externship Program is a field-based externship in which student’s apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice. The part-time externship program is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional working with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9430/Judicial Externship

The Judicial Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) in judicial chambers. The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial law clerk. The Judicial Externship will provide students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9431/Judicial Externship Seminar

The Judicial Externship Program offers a field-based experiential opportunity in which student’s apprentice (without compensation) in judicial chambers.  The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial clerk.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision-making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opp

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5239/Land Transactions & Finance

Professor(s)

Marc Mihaly

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5479/Law and Policy of Local Food Systems

This course explores state and local policies that impact distribution of food, restaurant regulation, and comparisons of state-level initiatives to bolster local food markets. Students will be exposed to specific skills for small and mid-size producers and entrepreneurs working in the agricultural and food industries. Finally, students will examine the state and local food laws and emerging entrepreneurial trends in food production.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5342 /Legal Adaptation to Global Warming

Adaptation is a necessary and unavoidable complement to mitigation measures required to address the challenge of climate change. Legal Adaptation to Climate Change addresses how rising sea levels, higher temperatures, changes in precipitation and other physical consequences of climate change will put pressure on established laws and legal institutions that were developed based on the assumption of a stable climate. The course will also explore potential new legal and policy tools for maintaining economic, social, political and environmental security in dramatically changing circumstances.

Professor(s)

John Echeverria

Semester

2019 Spring

REQ7170/Legal Methods

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

REQ7125/Legal Writing II: Theory & Practice

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

REQ7186/Legislation and Regulation Survey

This course will provide students an introduction to the legislative process, regulatory agencies, and agency law-making. Students will learn to navigate modern U.S. government institutions and processes, with a particular emphasis on the legislative process and the administrative state. Key topics include the structure and animating principles of the U.S.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

PUB7525 /Legislative Clinic

Admission to the Legislative Clinic is by application.  The course is open to students are enrolled in at the time of application or who have successfully completed the fall Legislation course, a prerequisite for this clinic.  
 

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

LLM9606/LLM Seminar

This seminar ranges widely over environmental law and policy, exploring diverse advanced topics and viewpoints, and entailing vigorous discussion of the leading environmental law and policy issues of our day. Each student will also complete a mini-thesis in which they will develop their own analysis perspective or solution to a problem in environmental law and policy.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

ADR6413/Mediation Advocacy

Working with a mediator to help clients resolve cases is an essential skill for the modern lawyer. Mediation Advocacy will allow students to examine the theory and practice of how to be effective advocates for their clients in the mediation setting. Students will develop this competency by exploring the various models of mediation.

Professor(s)

Donald "Tad" Powers

Semester

2019 Spring

GPP7815/Municipal Law

Representing a client at the municipal level is a challenge like no other in the law. A good attorney must be prepared for everything in forums that occasionally rely more on group sentiment and politics than procedure and rigor. Yet, municipal work is often the most rewarding as the work here as immediate and profound impacts on the community. This course is an introduction to the various issues faced by lawyers representing local government entities. Students will become familiar with the procedures for challenging or defending actions taken by municipalities.

Professor(s)

Daniel Richardson

Semester

2019 Spring

DIV7620/Native Americans & the Law

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

ADR6420/Negotiation

This course is designed to help you explore what it means to be an effective negotiator and to practice the skills needed to improve on this important life skill.  You will be expected to learn and apply theories from a broad range of disciplines including law, economics, psychology, sociology and management.  These theories will be discussed and debated in class discussions and practice through highly interactive simulations.  The course examines the dynamics, constraints, and skills needed to be an effective negotiator.

Professor(s)

Gregory S. Clayton

Semester

2019 Spring

REQ7265/Professional Responsibility

This course examines an attorney's obligations under ethical codes and law related to professional conduct. Students should acquire comprehensive knowledge of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct, and learn how to apply the Rules to resolve concrete ethical issues they may face in practice and on the Multi-State Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE). Diverse areas of legal practice are covered with some special attention to issues facing environmental lawyers. Case studies and problems are the primary vehicles for learning. At least one simulation will be included.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

REQ7160/Property

Professor(s)

Reed Elizabeth Loder, John Echeverria

Semester

2019 Spring

BUS6280 /Sales

This course covers primarily Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Article 2 governs sales of goods. Coverage includes formation and modification of contracts for sale, Article 2's statute of frauds, warranties, and risk allocations when goods are stored or transported, breach, remedies for sellers and buyers, and contractual limitations on remedies. The course will include references to consumer rights as well as comparisons between the common law of contract and the Code's rules and concepts. Method of evaluation: Final exam

Professor(s)

David B. Firestone

Semester

2019 Spring

BUS6290/Securities Regulation

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9411/Semester In Practice (SIP)

The Semester in Practice (SiP) Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice. The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional who are experienced lawyers or professionals with a JD (where appropriate) who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9412/Semester in Practice (SIP) - Class

The Semester in Practice (SiP) Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice. The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional who are experienced lawyers or professionals with a JD (where appropriate) who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

DIV7615/Sexual Orientation & the Law Seminar

Professor(s)

Greg Johnson

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9310/South Royalton Legal Clinic FT

Students work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel.  Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners.  Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship.  Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

CLI9312 /South Royalton Legal Clinic PT

Students work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel.  Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners.  Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship.  Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Spring

INT7428/Trade Law and Policy

Professor(s)

Peter Teachout

Semester

2019 Spring

LIT7220 /Trial Practice

This course covers the important aspects of a trial, including jury selection, opening statements, direct and cross examination, exhibits, objections, expert witnesses, and closing arguments. Each week students are assigned problems which present specific advocacy issues and which require role playing and examination of witnesses. The course culminates in a full, simulated trial. This is a “learn by doing” course and requires active class participation. Prerequisite: Evidence; may NOT be taken concurrently.

Professor(s)

Jordana Levine

Semester

2019 Spring

ENV5246/Water Quality

This course takes an in depth look at the Clean Water Act and related statutes such as the Safe Drinking Water Act, The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (“Ocean Dumping Act”) and the Coastal Zone Management Act. Common law remedies are also considered. Guest speakers will provide additional perspectives.
 
Method of Evaluation:  One commentary (1000 words) and take-home final take home.  
AWR (No)

Professor(s)

Thomas McHenry

Semester

2019 Spring