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Vermont Law School has resumed on-campus classes for the fall. Masks are currently required for all community members. For information on campus access, health and safety protocols, and testing requirements please visit vermontlaw.edu/covid19.

2019 Fall Residential Classes

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Students, please note:  CampusWeb is the authoritative source for class information, so please refer to CampusWeb when making final registration ​​decisions.​​​​​

2019 Fall Residential Classes

ADR6410.01/Alternative Dispute Resolution

This course presents the theory and practice of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration that constitute the foundation of alternative dispute resolution (ADR) through lecture and simulations. Examines the different theories and approaches to ADR, as well as the wide range of issues that arise in the selection and application of these dispute resolution techniques.

Professor(s)

Joan Vogel

Semester

2019 Fall

ADR6420.01/Negotiation

A hands-on introduction to the theory and practice of negotiation. Explores the tension that is created in every negotiation between cooperating to create value with the other side and competing to claim value against the other side. While there is a lecture component of this course, instruction relies heavily on the use of simulations.

Professor(s)

Donald "Tad" Powers

Semester

2019 Fall

BUS6218.01/Intro to Start Up Law

This course offers an introduction to the legal skills and knowledge needed to provide entrepreneurs and emerging start-ups with legal guidance. Using innovate legal tools and processes, the course simulates the legal guidance considerations necessary to launch an enterprise through simulated exercises with triple bottom line companies. The concentration on triple bottom line companies that impact environmental issues and social justice creates the opportunity to explore public benefit enterprise concepts that bring both mainstream and distinct legal concerns to light.

Professor(s)

Jeannette Eicks

Semester

2019 Fall

BUS6219.01/Entrepreneurship and Legal Lab Practice

In the Entrepreneurship and Legal Lab Practicum (VLSell) course, students will work with practicing attorneys to provide legal and strategic advice to entrepreneurs, start-ups and early stage companies through a practicum experience or work with the Center for Legal Innovation and a practicing attorney to create innovative scalable legal solutions for low-bono and pro-bono start-up clients. Students may sign up for this course for 2 to 12 credits with the required time spent at the law firm adjust according to the number of credits taken.

Professor(s)

Jeannette Eicks

Semester

2019 Fall

BUS6235.01/Corporations & Other Business Assoc.

This course focuses on the laws that govern the most commonly encountered firms or entities in the U.S. that individuals organize themselves in order to conduct the range of entrepreneurial activities commonly referred to as business. The specific business entities we’ll cover include sole proprietorships, partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations (especially the corporate form because of its dominance). We’ll also consider some of the evolving newcomers to the field – such as benefit corporations (“B-Corps”) and low-profit limited liability companies (“L3Cs”).

Professor(s)

Mark Latham

Semester

2019 Fall

BUS6237.01/Debtor-Creditor Law & Bankruptcy

An exploration of consumer bankruptcy law under Chapters 7, 12, and 13 of the U.S. Bankruptcy Code and how the law impacts the rights of debtors and creditors. The course covers the creation of consumer lender-borrower relationships, including promissory notes, security agreements, and mortgages; rights of borrowers under consumer protection and exemption statutes; the nature of relief that is afforded debtors, and creditor remedies under state and federal law. One court day will be scheduled in lieu of a regular class meeting with mandatory attendance.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Fall

BUS6245.01/Employment Law

Examines areas of federal and state labor law which regulate the employment relationship and which provide minimum protection outside of collective bargaining. Major topics considered include wrongful discharge, post-employment liability, employee privacy, genetic and drug testing, and employee welfare and retirement benefits (ERISA).

Professor(s)

Joan Vogel

Semester

2019 Fall
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