2017 Spring Residential Classes

Students, please note: CampusWeb is the authoritative source for class information, so please refer to CampusWeb when making final registration decisions.

 

ENV5105/Administrative Law

Administrative law is the law relating to administrative agencies, which almost every practicing lawyer or policy advocate encounters at one or more points in her career.  This class focuses on federal agencies - what they are (executive or independent), what they do (adjudicate, regulate, or investigate), and what constrains their authority (the Constitution, Congress, and the judiciary).  Lawyers and policy advisors who work for agencies, regulated industries, and public interest groups should understand these basic principles of administrative law in order to work as effective advocate

Professor(s)

Michael Dworkin

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9333/ADV South Royalton Legal Clinic 13

Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5301.A/Advanced Agricultural and Food Law Writing Seminar

This seminar is designed to provide students with an opportunity write a significant article (approx. 6,000 words) on a narrowly focused issue involving agricultural and/or food law. The purpose of this seminar is to give students who are interested in a variety of areas an opportunity to explore an emerging issue through research and writing. The goal will be to produce a publishable quality article over the course of the semester.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

WRI7360/Advanced Appellate Advocacy

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9437/Advanced Energy Clinic

The Advanced Energy Clinic explores at an advanced level, the practical aspects of real world energy projects from the stage of conceptualization, development, contracting, financing, regulatory approval and construction.  Students will be further exposed to the state and federal statutes, rules, tax codes, and ordinances that apply to the development of energy projects particularly those that promote sustainability at the community level.  Students will also review and/or develop purchased power and other commercial agreements governing these projects.  Current project areas include comm

Professor(s)

Kevin B. Jones

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5303/Advanced Energy Writing Seminar

This seminar provides students an opportunity to produce a significant written paper based on sophisticated research and thinking about a key area in energy policy and law. Seminar topics include proposals for reducing the economic and environmental costs of meeting energy needs. Efforts to reduce costs through more efficient delivery and end-use are assessed, with specific attention to the statutory, regulatory, and contractual techniques for creating sound incentives.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9326/Advanced EnvNat ResLaw Clinic 6

Advanced ENRLC provides students an opportunity to take the Clinic for a second semester and build on their previous ENRLC experiences.  Students will further develop their understanding of relevant substantive law and the lawyering skills introduced in the initial Clinic course.  They will be expected to take greater responsibility for counseling clients, developing cases, and reaching resolutions consistent with client goals.  They will also be expected to help novice clinicians approach the work of the Clinic.  In pursuing these advanced competencies, students will develop their leader

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9329/Advanced EnvNat ResLaw Clinic 9

Advanced ENRLC provides students an opportunity to take the Clinic for a second semester and build on their previous ENRLC experiences.  Students will further develop their understanding of relevant substantive law and the lawyering skills introduced in the initial Clinic course.  They will be expected to take greater responsibility for counseling clients, developing cases, and reaching resolutions consistent with client goals.  They will also be expected to help novice clinicians approach the work of the Clinic.  In pursuing these advanced competencies, students will develop their leader

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

WRI7344/Advanced Legal Research

This seminar builds on the introduction to legal research course by expanding students’ knowledge of available resources and research strategies. The seminar covers topics such as statutory law including legislative history, administrative law, municipal law, and case law as well as secondary sources not covered in the introductory course.

Professor(s)

Jane Woldow

Semester

2017 Spring

WRI7345.A/Advanced Regulatory Research

This course focuses on federal sources of administrative law and teaches students to research agency regulations, agency decisions, and other sources of administrative law, using a variety print and online sources. We will cover administrative authority in its various forms, including:  enabling statutes, proposed and final agency regulations, agency decisions, opinions and policy, and executive orders. In addition, we will review federal and state legislative and administrative history, secondary sources and agency websites.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

WRI7350/Advanced Skills for Practice

This course is designed to further prepare students for legal research in various work settings by highlighting advanced "practice oriented" skills as well as exposing students to new resources they are likely to encounter in practice. While the course will give students a chance to explore highly specialized databases on LexisAdvance, WestlawNext and Bloomberg Law, the focus will be on cost effective alternatives to Lexis and Westlaw such as Fastcase, Casemaker and more.

Professor(s)

Cynthia Lewis

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9336/Advanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 6

Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9339/Advanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 9

Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5401/Agricultural Environmental Law

This course is one of the foundational courses of the agriculture and food law and policy curriculum.

Professor(s)

Laurie Ristino

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5205/Air Pollution Law and Policy

This course will cover the major regulatory approaches embodied in the Clean Air Act, including health-based ambient standards, technology-based standards, joint state-federal implementation under the principle of "cooperative federalism," direct EPA regulation using industry-by-industry approaches, pollution trading programs, permitting, and enforcement. The primary focus of the course will be on stationary source pollution, with a brief introduction to mobile source pollution.

Professor(s)

Jessica Scott

Semester

2017 Spring

INT7432/Applied Human Rights

This advanced international human rights law course provides hands-on experiential learning in international human rights law and advocacy through work on client-based human rights projects for non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and inter-governmental organizations (IGOs).  Students will communicate regularly with their partner organization through email and Skype or similar platforms, and meet weekly as a group for lively classroom discussions of readings and of issues that arise in their project work.  The course exposes students to a range of lawyering competencies, using the projec

Professor(s)

Stephanie Farrior

Semester

2017 Spring

ADR6405/Arbitration

This course is designed to familiarize students with the legal issues surrounding the arbitration process.  Arbitration is presented as an efficient, expeditious, and (sometimes) lower-cost alternative to litigation that is growing in popularity. Many areas of law commonly use arbitration, including securities regulation, commercial law, employment law, medical malpractice, and construction law. This course examines the nature of the arbitration process, rules governing hearings, and the relationship between arbitration and the court system.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

XAD7823/Bankruptcy, Foreclosure and Collection

This course is an introduction to consumer bankruptcy, Vermont foreclosure practice and collection. The students learn the basic differences between the chapters of the bankruptcy code, and the impact a bankruptcy may have on the circumstances facing prospective clients. The students also gain some insight as to how a bankruptcy filing or foreclosure might impact other matters such as domestic relations, estates, collections and other civil litigation.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

WRI7352/Bar Exam Skills and Tactics, A and B

​Bar Exam Skills and Tactics (“BEST”) is a three-credit course designed to provide students with the analytical, test-taking, writing, and study skills that are critical to students' success on the bar exam.

Professor(s)

Joe Brennan

Semester

2017 Spring

REQ7103/Civil Procedure II, A & B

Professor(s)

Sean Nolon, Pamela Stephens

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5306.A/Comparative Environmental Law Research

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

INT7407/Comparative Law: Comparative Legal Systems

SPECIAL SCHEDULING: This class will meet three times a week (M, W, Th) until [Spring Break][March 11-19],then not again until the last two weeks of classes, when students will present their final papers as works-in-progress. Final papers will be due during the exam period, date to be determined.
The classic distinction between Common Law and Civil Law has grown less significant in the 21st century as national legal systems influence each other across borders and globally.

Professor(s)

Betsy Baker

Semester

2017 Spring

REQ7112/Constitutional Law A & B

Professor(s)

Peter Teachout, Greg Johnson

Semester

2017 Spring

BUS6235/Corporations

This course covers how to organize a business enterprise from a legal perspective.  We compare the strengths and limitations of different structures for businesses, including sole-proprietorships, general partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. Supplementing the casebook, we learn about business financing, management and shareholder activism, by following in real-time the activities of ten large US corporations.

Professor(s)

Jennifer Taub

Semester

2017 Spring

REQ7140/Criminal Law A & B

Professor(s)

Clara Gimenez, Robert Sand

Semester

2017 Spring

CRI7350/Criminal Law Clinic

This course gives students the opportunity to experience criminal practice in either prosecution or defense settings under the close supervision of our distinguished practitioner-faculty members.  Students will be placed in the prosecution, defense or appellate defense practice settings, and will receive classroom instruction once per week for two hours covering foundational aspects of Vermont criminal.  Students will then apply classroom concepts in real criminal cases, working under close supervision of the classroom faculty, Anna Saxman (Vermont Deputy Defender General) David Cahill (D

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

CRI7307/Criminal Practice and Procedure

The course will focus on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and the 4th, 5th, 6th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Students will examine the constitutional principles of criminal procedure and how those principles are actually utilized in practice. This course will give students the basic understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional criminal law and procedure while at the same time learning the practical application of theory to practice.

Professor(s)

Anna Saxman '85

Semester

2017 Spring

BUS6371/CyberSecurity

Organizations and individuals face a multitude of complex threats to confidentiality, availability and integrity of their data and other information in today’s cyber environment.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9405/Dispute Resolution Clinic

This clinical offering trains students to mediate. While training, students observe and will later conduct mediations in various Vermont and New Hampshire courts. The course begins with an intensive skills session in the form of a day-long training session scheduled for Monday, January 9th before the start of spring classes. Attendance at this session is MANDATORY. Students interested in taking the course MUST attend the Monday session. No exceptions can be made. There will also be one Saturday training session, presently scheduled for February 4th. This session is also mandatory.

Professor(s)

Robin Barone

Semester

2017 Spring

BUS6245/Employment Law

Examines areas of federal and state labor law which regulate the employment relationship and which provide minimum protection outside of collective bargaining. Major topics considered include wrongful discharge, post-employment liability, employee privacy, genetic and drug testing, employment discrimination, and wage and hour law.
Method of evaluation:  Final exam

Professor(s)

Joan Vogel

Semester

2017 Spring

BUS6246/Employment Law Practice

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9427/Energy Clinic

Through this course students will be introduced to the practical aspects of real world energy projects. Students will become involved in some aspect of the development or evaluation of real life energy projects (e.g. solar PV, energy efficiency, electric vehicle infrastructure) and may have the opportunity to support the legal and policy requirements of a particular project or through the development of model legal documents to facilitate future projects.

Professor(s)

Kevin B. Jones

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5228/Energy Regulation and the Environment

This course builds on the fall course Energy Law and Policy in a Carbon-Constrained World. The course exposes students to the legal, economic, and environmental policy issues involved in both energy regulation and competitive energy markets, focusing on electricity. The course examines the evolution, theory and techniques of rate of return regulation and explains how utilities are regulated, including alternative regulatory models.

Professor(s)

Kevin B. Jones

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9302/Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic

The Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic functions as a public interest environmental law firm with a collegial atmosphere that encourages interaction and feedback among students and Clinic faculty.  Under the supervision of experienced environmental attorneys, student clinicians represent community groups and conservation organizations in real-world cases and projects.  Although the Clinic experience varies from student to student depending on the cases and projects assigned, the range of typical experiences includes: communicating with clients, experts, agency personnel, and o

Professor(s)

Kenneth Rumelt

Semester

2017 Spring

ADR6415/Environmental Dispute Resolution

Resolving environmental disputes is notoriously difficult.  These conflicts involve multiple parties, complicated factual matters and typically resist simple solutions.  In this course, students will explore these characteristics, investigate the full range of processes available to manage environmental disputes and assesses relevant policy and practical considerations of process selection.  Over the course of the semester, we will compare the use of adversarial and collaborative processes in environmental disputes and explore the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches.  We

Professor(s)

Martha Judy

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5220/Environmental Economics and Markets

The course introduces students to the discipline of environmental economics and exposes them to debates over the use of market-based instruments in environmental, energy, and climate policy. It introduces students to basic economics and finance concepts, examines key principles about market behavior and efficiency, and applies these basic elements and concepts to common environmental problems.

Professor(s)

Kevin B. Jones

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5305/Environmental Ethics

This seminar examines the values and ethical assumptions in problem solving about the environment, enabling students to perfect their reasoning about environmental law and policy.  It introduces various ethical approaches to resolving environmental problems, including:  intrinsic value, biocentrism, utilitarianism, eco-feminism, deep ecology, social ecology, eco-centric, and religious/spiritual.  These ethical foundations are applied to concrete environmental policy issues, covering aspects of species and place restoration, climate change, relationships of humans to the non-human world, g

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5115/Environmental Law

This is a survey course that will introduce students to the basic concepts of U.S.

Professor(s)

Mark Latham

Semester

2017 Spring

FAM7705/Estate & Gift Taxation

This course examines the fundamentals of the wealth transfer taxation, i.e., the transfer taxation of gifts, estates, and generation-skipping transfers. It will include discussion of basic estate planning devices, but not more sophisticated techniques. This is a problem-based course. Students will enhance their skills in (1) reading and analyzing statutes, regulations, administrative materials, and cases, (2) spotting issues and applying the law to factual situations, and (3) understanding policies and principles. 
Prerequisite: Estates; this may be taken concurrently.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

XAD7821/Estate Planning

Estate Planning: This class is an introduction to estate planning including the law of wills, testamentary and inter vivo trusts, basic probate of wills, basic income and estate tax considerations, powers of attorney, advance care directives and ethical and malpractice issues. Students in this segment will learn to draft a simple will and trust for surviving spouse and children, conduct a client intake interview, and prepare a durable power of attorney, and advance directive for health care.

Professor(s)

Gary Brooks

Semester

2017 Spring

FAM7710/Estates

This course examines the statutory and judicial rules governing the gratuitous transfer of property. This includes transfers by gift, intestate succession, wills, trusts, and other non-probate mechanisms.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

INT7414/European Union Law - Trento

IMPORTANT: Students taking this course will be billed a $300 administrative fee on their spring tuition bill to help defray the cost of providing stipends for participating Trento faculty. Because of the need for advance planning by our partner institution, students who drop the course after Friday, December 16 at 5pm, will forfeit the fee, regardless of whether they complete the course or not. Students enrolled in the course must arrange and pay for their own travel and lodging for the Italy portion of the course.

Professor(s)

Peter Teachout

Semester

2017 Spring

LIT7210.B/Evidence

Professor(s)

Clara Gimenez

Semester

2017 Spring

LIT7211/Evidence Lab A - E

Professor(s)

Larry Novins

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9428/Food & Agriculture Clinic

Clinic: In the Food and Agriculture Clinic, students collaborate with local, regional, national and international partner organizations to develop and publicly disseminate law, policy and market tools that provide guidance to food system constituencies, including farmers, food entrepreneurs, consumers, legislators, and advocates, on how to advance law, policy and market initiatives that directly or indirectly promote (1) environmentally and economically sustainable agriculture, (2) public health, (3) food access and food security, (4) local and regional agriculture economies and (5) anim

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9429/Food and Agriculture Seminar

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5380/Food Regulation and Policy

The modern food system, from farm to fork, has given rise to profound health, environmental, social, and cultural consequences.  Bundling these consequences into a series of legal and policy issues, this course will facilitate discussion on a host of topics: food safety, obesity, nutrition, sustainability, food deserts, labeling, marketing, trade, biotechnology, private standards and certification, local food and the relationship between the state, local and federal governments regarding the regulations of food.  Readings of cases, legislation, regulations, and provocative writings will b

Professor(s)

Laurie Beyranevand '03

Semester

2017 Spring

INT7411/French Corporate Law

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

INT7410/French Legal Method

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5375/Global Energy Justice

This course revolves around a central questions: how can justice theory help people make meaningful decisions about the production, the delivery, the use and the effects of energy?

Professor(s)

Michael Dworkin

Semester

2017 Spring

BUS6255/Income Tax

This course is an introduction to federal income taxation. Topics include: the concept of income; exclusions from income; deductions and credits available to individual non-business taxpayers and business taxpayers; sales and other dispositions of property; capital gains and losses; and tax policy. Class discussion focuses on applying the Internal Revenue Code and other legal authority to problems.
Method of evaluation: Class participation, written projects, and final examination.

Professor(s)

David B. Firestone

Semester

2017 Spring

BUS6260/Intellectual Property

Professor(s)

Oliver R. Goodenough

Semester

2017 Spring

LIT7318/Intensive Trial Practice

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

INT7420/International Criminal Law

This course will explore International Criminal Law, broadly defined to include criminal issues that arise in the international setting and international issues that arise in the context of national criminal law.  This broad definition will encompass consideration of the prosecution of mass atrocity crimes (war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and the crime of aggression) in national courts and in international tribunals, both ad hoc and the permanent International Criminal Court.
Method of Evaluation:  Final Exam and Class Participation

Professor(s)

Pamela Stephens

Semester

2017 Spring

INT7491.A/International Law Topics

Professor(s)

Stephanie Farrior

Semester

2017 Spring

BUS6360/Intro to eLawyering

​This introductory course focuses on how new technologies affect the practice of law.  Topics are segmented in to three discrete areas of study:  Virtual Law Practice; Document Assembly and Expert Systems; and eDiscovery and Big Data.  The virtual law practice section offers students a brief glimpse of the promise of virtual practice as well as the practical details and ethical considerations of setting up such a practice.  The section covering document assembly and expert systems demonstrates the efficiency of these systems while offering students an opportunity to work hands-on with the

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9425/JD PT Externship

The Part-Time JD Externship Program is a field-based externship in which student’s apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice.  The part-time externship program is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional working with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The Part-Time Externship provides students an opportunity to participate in a range of lawyering tasks so that they develop an improved understanding of the legal p

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9430/Judicial Externship

The Judicial Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) in judicial chambers.  The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial law clerk.  The Judicial Externship will provide students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develo

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9431/Judicial Seminar

The Judicial Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) in judicial chambers.  The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial law clerk.  The Judicial Externship will provide students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develo

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5239/Land Transactions and Finance

Professor(s)

John Echeverria

Semester

2017 Spring

INT7412/Law of the European Union

This course provides an introduction to the structure and basic principles of international environmental law (IEL) and to IEL's place in international and domestic legal systems. The course evaluates the effectiveness of different IEL regimes, the role of international and non-governmental organizations in shaping IEL; the interrelationship between international legal process and domestic law; and the negotiation, conclusion, and implementation of international environmental agreements.

Professor(s)

Peter Teachout

Semester

2017 Spring

XAD7830/Legal Activism

This course examines the principles and practices of legal activism and lawyering for social change. Combining theoretical and practical approaches, the course uses historical and contemporary examples of political lawyering to expose students to a wide variety of mechanisms for effective advocacy including impact litigation, legislative advocacy, community organizing, fund-raising and financing, education, media-strategies, civil disobedience and engagement.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5342/Legal Adaptation to Global Warming

Adaptation is a necessary and unavoidable complement to mitigation measures required to address the challenge of climate change. Legal Adaptation to Climate Change addresses how rising sea levels, higher temperatures, changes in precipitation and other physical consequences of climate change will put pressure on established laws and legal institutions that were developed based on the assumption of a stable climate.

Professor(s)

John Echeverria

Semester

2017 Spring

REQ7170/Legal Methods

Professor(s)

Kerriann Stout

Semester

2017 Spring

REQ7125/Legal Writing II: Theory and Practice, A-F

Professor(s)

Brian Porto, Beth McCormack, Jared Carter

Semester

2017 Spring

PUB7525/Legislative Clinic

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

ADR6413/Mediation Advocacy

THIS IS AN INTENSIVE COURSE TO BE OFFERED OVER THE COURSE OF 4 DAYS.  The designated days are:January 27(2:10 - 6:30), January 28(8:00 - 6:30), February 17(2:10 - 6:30) and February 18(8:00 - 6:30),

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

XAD7815/Municipal Law

Representing a client at the municipal level is a challenge like no other in the law. A good attorney must be prepared for everything in forums that occasionally rely more on group sentiment and politics than procedure and rigor. Yet, municipal work is often the most rewarding as the work here as immediate and profound impacts on the community. This course is an introduction to the various issues faced by lawyers representing local government entities. Students will become familiar with the procedures for challenging or defending actions taken by municipalities.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

DIV7620/Native Americans and the Law

This course will focus on the constitutional, statutory and jurisprudential rules that make up the field of Federal Indian Law.  Attention will be given to the historical framework from which the rules were derived.  After tracing the development of the underlying legal doctrines which are prominent today, we will consider subject-specific areas of Indian Law like hunting and fishing rights, stewardship of natural resources, economic development (including tribal gaming and natural resource development) and protection of religion and cultural lifestyles. 
 

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5235/Natural Resources Law

One third of the nation’s land base belongs to the American public and much of it is managed by the United States Forest Service and agencies of the Department of the Interior. Beginning with the creation of Yellowstone, the world’s first national park, in 1872, and the protection of federal forest reserves in the 1890s, the United States practically invented the concept of public lands and in the process have left an enduring gift to the nation and the world.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

ADR6420/Negotiation

This class meets 4 days.  Friday, February 10 - Saturday, February, 11 and Friday, February 24 - Saturday February 25.
 
THIS IS AN INTENSIVE COURSE TO BE OFFERED OVER THE COURSE OF 4 DAYS.  The designated days are: TBD

Professor(s)

Gregory S. Clayton

Semester

2017 Spring

REQ7265/Professional Responsibility A & B

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

REQ7160/Property A & B

Professor(s)

Reed Elizabeth Loder, John Echeverria

Semester

2017 Spring

XAD7812/Real Estate Transactions

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

BUS6280/Sales

This course covers primarily Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Article 2 governs sales of goods. Coverage includes formation and modification of contracts for sale, Article 2's statute of frauds, warranties, and risk allocations when goods are stored or transported, breach, remedies for sellers and buyers, and contractual limitations on remedies. The course will include references to consumer rights as well as comparisons between the common law of contract and the Code's rules and concepts.
Method of evaluation: Final exam

Professor(s)

David B. Firestone

Semester

2017 Spring

BUS6285.A/Secured Transactions

Professor(s)

Joan Vogel

Semester

2017 Spring

BUS6290/Securities Regulation

This course introduces students to the federal laws and regulations designed to protect investors in the U.S. We identify the registration and disclosure requirements for securities offerings as well as the ongoing disclosure and other requirements associated with secondary market distribution. We explore the context and content of the first federal securities law of the 1930s through the most recent law affecting the financial markets, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010.

Professor(s)

Jennifer Taub

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9411/Semester In Practice

The Semester in Practice (SiP) Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice.  The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional who are experienced lawyers or professionals with a JD (where appropriate) who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The SiP provides an opportunity – through observation, participation, practice, and reflection – to improve stu

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9412/Semester In Practice Class

The Semester in Practice (SiP) Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice.  The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional who are experienced lawyers or professionals with a JD (where appropriate) who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The SiP provides an opportunity – through observation, participation, practice, and reflection – to improve stu

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

BUS6262/Social Enterprise Law

This course examines wide range of legal structures that social and environmental enterprises currently use to accomplish their missions—nonprofit organizations, traditional for-profits, L3Cs, benefit corporations, cooperatives and other business forms that place missions such as "Planet" and "People" ahead of or on an equal footing with "Profit." The course contemplates the advantages and disadvantages of using these forms to accomplish these missions, how they should be adopted or modified, and whether society should devise other structures to further these missions.

Professor(s)

Oliver R. Goodenough

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9315/South Royalton Legal Clinic Class A & B

Classroom component:
Fall 2016-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks:  8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held as scheduled Monday – Friday for the first 5 weeks.  There are 5 consecutive class days to start; after that 11 (eleven) class days are spread throughout the following 4 weeks.
Registration:  You must apply to enroll in SRLC through the VLS Clinical Communication application system.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9310/South Royalton Legal Clinic FT

Students work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel.  Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners.  Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship.  Students interview and counsel clients, prepare an

Professor(s)

James C. May

Semester

2017 Spring

CLI9312/South Royalton Legal Clinic PT

Classroom component:
Fall 2016-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks:  8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held as scheduled Monday – Friday for the first 5 weeks.  There are 5 consecutive class days to start; after that 11 (eleven) class days are spread throughout the following 4 weeks.
Registration:  You must apply to enroll in SRLC through the VLS Clinical Communication application system.

Professor(s)

James C. May

Semester

2017 Spring

LIT7220.B/Trial Practice

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

LIT7220.A/Trial Practice A

This course covers the important aspects of a trial, including jury selection, opening statements, direct and cross examination, exhibits, objections, expert witnesses, and closing arguments. Each week students are assigned problems which present specific advocacy issues and which require role playing and examination of witnesses. The course culminates in a full, simulated trial. This is a “learn by doing” course and requires active class participation.
Prerequisite: Evidence; may NOT be taken concurrently.

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5246/Water Quality

This course takes an in depth look at the Clean Water Act and related statutes such as the Safe Drinking Water Act, The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (“Ocean Dumping Act”) and the Coastal Zone Management Act. Common law remedies are also considered. Guest speakers will provide additional perspectives.
 
Method of Evaluation:  One commentary (1000 words) and take-home final take home. 
AWR (No)

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring

ENV5250/Watershed Management and Protection

This is a capstone course for the water curriculum. It will involve a weekly class seminar and two day-long field trips, a major paper, and a presentation. We have managed to create a dizzying patchwork of water management laws that span local, state and federal jurisdictions.  We manage ground and surface water, point and non-point source pollution differently.

Professor(s)

Melissa Scanlan

Semester

2017 Spring

JUR7350.A/Women and the Law Seminar

Professor(s)

Semester

2017 Spring