​​​This campus is different. It has the ingredients most people seek when they want to restore themselves—natural beauty, a purposeful sense of quiet, and a powerful sense of community. It's a place where law school students actually have fun. Where classmates inspire each other and become friends for life. Where lawyers- and advocates-in-training are immersed in a diverse community of risk-takers and out-of-the-box thinkers who actually want to change the world, not fit into it.

Vermont Law School is a place where you see farmers bring eggs to market in the morning and take a hike between classes. Where faculty, male and female, straight and gay, participate in the drag revue. It's a place where classes get cancelled after a major tropical storm so students can help neighbors clean up. Where you can work in a legal clinic with local residents in need—single mothers, neglected children, immigrant farm workers—who are underserved by the law.

In Vermont there are no billboards because, 40 years ago, our faculty helped create the laws which prohibit them. There are more CSAs here per capita than in any other state. Civil unions began here. Our power comes from wind, solar, and nuclear sources.​

The alchemy of this place is difficult to define. It's transparently obvious to people who are here. We call it SoRo, but the map says South Royalton, Vermont.

Join us.

​A Vermont Law student studying on the campus quad.