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Advanced Agricultural and Food Law Writing Seminarhttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1745Advanced Agricultural and Food Law Writing SeminarAdv. Ag and Food Writing SemBeyranevand, LaurieNone15.0000000000000This seminar is designed to provide students with an opportunity write a significant article (approx. 6,000 words) on a narrowly focused issue involving agricultural and/or food law. The purpose of this seminar is to give students who are interested in a variety of areas an opportunity to explore an emerging issue through research and writing. The goal will be to produce a publishable quality article over the course of the semester. The seminar is also designed to be a capstone course for students interested in earning a certificate in agricultural and food law.2.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMonday, 3:35 - 5:15 PM1745
ENV5235http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1582ENV5235Natural Resources LawHoffmann, Hillary<div>One third of the nation’s land base belongs to the American public and much of it is managed by the United States Forest Service and agencies of the Department of the Interior. Beginning with the creation of Yellowstone, the world’s first national park, in 1872, and the protection of federal forest reserves in the 1890s, the United States practically invented the concept of public lands and in the process have left an enduring gift to the nation and the world.<br>These federal lands traditionally provided timber, minerals and forage for a growing nation.  In the last 50 years, Americans have to come to appreciate their public lands for wildlife habitat, sources of clean water, wilderness, energy development and a myriad of outdoor recreation opportunities. While America’s public lands are vast, they are not limitless, and resource conflicts have dominated land management decisions for the last 40 years. Those conflicts are reflected in the courts, Congress and local communities, where interest groups of all types vie for their share of public lands resources. Students will explore not only pertinent statutes and regulations, but the social and economic debates that are equally critical to understand federal public lands and resources, including climate change.  <br>Method of evaluation:  Final exam.  AWR (No)</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1582
ADR6405http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1634ADR6405ArbitrationVogel,Joan<div>This course is designed to familiarize students with the legal issues surrounding the arbitration process.  Arbitration is presented as an efficient, expeditious, and (sometimes) lower-cost alternative to litigation that is growing in popularity. Many areas of law commonly use arbitration, including securities regulation, commercial law, employment law, medical malpractice, and construction law. This course examines the nature of the arbitration process, rules governing hearings, and the relationship between arbitration and the court system. Students will study issues surrounding the enforceability and fairness of agreements to arbitrate, defenses to arbitration clauses, and judicial review of an arbitration award. Students will also learn how to read and understand arbitration provisions.  This class will provide students with a thorough understanding of arbitration law and a solid foundation for legal practice, whether in alternative dispute resolution tribunals or in the civil justice system. <br>Method of evaluation:  class participation, simulations, short papers on the simulations, and a research paper instead of a final exam.</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1634
ADR6413http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1635ADR6413Mediation AdvocacyPowers, Donald<div>THIS IS AN INTENSIVE COURSE TO BE OFFERED OVER THE COURSE OF 4 DAYS.  The designated days are:January 27(2:10 - 6:30), January 28(8:00 - 6:30), February 17(2:10 - 6:30) and February 18(8:00 - 6:30), <br>Working with a mediator to help clients resolve cases is an essential skill for the modern lawyer.  Mediation Advocacy will allow students to examine the theory and practice of how to be effective advocates for their clients in the mediation setting.  Students will develop this competency by exploring the various models of mediation.  The course will take students through all aspects of client representation, from counseling regarding ADR methods, selecting cases for mediation, selecting a mediator, writing mediation briefs and agreements, pivotal legal issues, and effective advocacy in the mediation session.  This course will rely heavily on role-plays to practice many of the skills needed to effectively represent a party in mediation.<br> <br>Classroom time will consist of lectures, discussion, role-play and critique.</div><div>Method of Evaluation: Performance in simulations, participation in-class and a final negotiation (Does not satisfy AWR)<br>MELP:  Distributional requirement - Alternative Dispute Resolution.<br></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bJanuary 27(2:10 - 6:30), January 28(8:00 - 6:30), February 17(2:10 - 6:30) and February 18(8:00 - 6:30), 1635
ADR6415http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1636ADR6415Environmental Dispute ResolutionJudy,Martha<div> Resolving environmental disputes is notoriously difficult.  These conflicts involve multiple parties, complicated factual matters and typically resist simple solutions.  In this course, students will explore these characteristics, investigate the full range of processes available to manage environmental disputes and assesses relevant policy and practical considerations of process selection.  Over the course of the semester, we will compare the use of adversarial and collaborative processes in environmental disputes and explore the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches.  We will rely heavily on simulations to explore theories and build the skills needed to be effective environmental negotiators.  Through this course you will develop an understanding of how to create an effective problem-solving climate that will meet your client’s needs.<br>ATTENDING THE FIRST CLASS IS MANDATORY<br>Environmental Law and Administrative Law are strongly recommended, but not required.<br>Method of Evaluation: Performance in simulations, participation in Class and a final exam (Does not satisfy AWR)<br>JD/MELP:  Alternative Dispute Resolution<br>MELP:  Alternative Dispute Resolution<br></div>GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1636
ADR6420http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1637ADR6420NegotiationClayton,Gregory<div>This class meets 4 days.  Friday, February 10 - Saturday, February, 11 and Friday, February 24 - Saturday February 25.</div><div> </div><div>THIS IS AN INTENSIVE COURSE TO BE OFFERED OVER THE COURSE OF 4 DAYS.  The designated days are: TBD<br>This course is designed to help you explore what it means to be an effective negotiator and to practice the skills needed to improve on this important life skill.  You will be expected to learn and apply theories from a broad range of disciplines including law, economics, psychology, sociology and management.  These theories will be discussed and debated in class discussions and practice through highly interactive simulations.  The course examines the dynamics, constraints, and skills needed to be an effective negotiator.  It focuses equally on the use of negotiation in deal making and to resolve disputes.  We will conduct simulations in a variety of contexts including face-to-face, over the phone and email.  We will explore how dynamics change when moving from two-party to multi-party negotiations and look at how ethics should influence our behavior.  Readings will need to be completed ahead of time and a final project will be completed after classes.<br> <br>Method of Evaluation: Performance in simulations, participation in Class and a final negotiation (Does not satisfy AWR)<br>MELP:  Distributional requirement  - Alternative Dispute Resolution.<br></div>GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bFebruary 10-11 and February 24-251637
BUS6246http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1638BUS6246Employment Law PracticeEarle,Caroline<div></div>1.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1638
BUS6235http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1639BUS6235CorporationsTaub,Jennifer<div>This course covers how to organize a business enterprise from a legal perspective.  We compare the strengths and limitations of different structures for businesses, including sole-proprietorships, general partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. Supplementing the casebook, we learn about business financing, management and shareholder activism, by following in real-time the activities of ten large US corporations. We also study the law of agency, corporate governance and corporate social responsibility.  The course also considers corporate political spending and power in light of the Citizens United decision.<br> <br>Method of evaluation:  Final exam</div>4.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1639
BUS6245http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1640BUS6245Employment LawVogel,Joan<div>Examines areas of federal and state labor law which regulate the employment relationship and which provide minimum protection outside of collective bargaining. Major topics considered include wrongful discharge, post-employment liability, employee privacy, genetic and drug testing, employment discrimination, and wage and hour law.<br>Method of evaluation:  Final exam</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1640
BUS6255http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1641BUS6255Income TaxFirestone,David<div>This course is an introduction to federal income taxation. Topics include: the concept of income; exclusions from income; deductions and credits available to individual non-business taxpayers and business taxpayers; sales and other dispositions of property; capital gains and losses; and tax policy. Class discussion focuses on applying the Internal Revenue Code and other legal authority to problems.<br>Method of evaluation: Class participation, written projects, and final examination.</div>4.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1641
BUS6260http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1642BUS6260Intellectual PropertyGoodenough,Oliver2.00000000000000<div></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1642
BUS6262http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1643BUS6262Social Enterprise LawGoodenough,Oliver<div>This course examines wide range of legal structures that social and environmental enterprises currently use to accomplish their missions—nonprofit organizations, traditional for-profits, L3Cs, benefit corporations, cooperatives and other business forms that place missions such as "Planet" and "People" ahead of or on an equal footing with "Profit." The course contemplates the advantages and disadvantages of using these forms to accomplish these missions, how they should be adopted or modified, and whether society should devise other structures to further these missions. Over the course of the term, students will create their own project around a mission-driven enterprise of their choice, preparing a business plan as well as the documentation for the enterprise form that will structure it. Students will be evaluated on the realization of their project, their participation in the classroom and on a short objective test at the end of the term</div>2.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1643
BUS6280http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1644BUS6280SalesFirestone,David<div>This course covers primarily Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Article 2 governs sales of goods. Coverage includes formation and modification of contracts for sale, Article 2's statute of frauds, warranties, and risk allocations when goods are stored or transported, breach, remedies for sellers and buyers, and contractual limitations on remedies. The course will include references to consumer rights as well as comparisons between the common law of contract and the Code's rules and concepts.<br>Method of evaluation: Final exam</div>2.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1644
BUS6290http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1645BUS6290Securities RegulationTaub,Jennifer<div>This course introduces students to the federal laws and regulations designed to protect investors in the U.S. We identify the registration and disclosure requirements for securities offerings as well as the ongoing disclosure and other requirements associated with secondary market distribution. We explore the context and content of the first federal securities law of the 1930s through the most recent law affecting the financial markets, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. We cover the potential liability of various players involved in the offering and sale of securities, including issuers, officers, directors, brokers, dealers, attorneys, auditors and other participants. We consider issues regarding "insider" trading. Brief study is also made of the role of crowd funding after the JOBS Act.<br> <br>Method of evaluation:  Take home exam or Paper (AWR yes for paper)</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1645
BUS6360http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1646BUS6360Intro to eLawyeringEicks,Jeannette<div>​This introductory course focuses on how new technologies affect the practice of law.  Topics are segmented in to three discrete areas of study:  Virtual Law Practice; Document Assembly and Expert Systems; and eDiscovery and Big Data.  The virtual law practice section offers students a brief glimpse of the promise of virtual practice as well as the practical details and ethical considerations of setting up such a practice.  The section covering document assembly and expert systems demonstrates the efficiency of these systems while offering students an opportunity to work hands-on with the technical tools.  The eDiscovery and big data section also covers aspects of knowledge management and the use of technology as a tool in litigation.   Practice management components are interwoven throughout the course with special emphasis on the intersection of these tools with the eDiscovery process.  Each section of the course will focus on what now constitutes legal practice and how technology has disrupted the status quo.  The course also considers the secondary effects on law, lawyering and the legal profession likely to arise from the addition of technology to many legal tasks.  A one day trip to LegalTech in New York City is a required portion of this course.<br> <br>Method of evaluation:  Three projects and class participation will be the basis for the class grade.<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1646
BUS6371http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1647BUS6371CyberSecurityLatham,Mark<div>Organizations and individuals face a multitude of complex threats to confidentiality, availability and integrity of their data and other information in today’s cyber environment. These threats, as well as regulatory requirements, customer privacy concerns, organizational objectives and culture, are key considerations for the development of sound cybersecurity law.  eLawyering: Cybersecurity provides in-depth examination of the law dealing with the security of information and data and its corresponding technology.  Topics will include identify theft and identity protection laws, computer and network security, HIPPA, the SEC and financial industry cybersecurity regulations, social media and cloud computing privacy, social media and cloud computing click-wrap agreements, government surveillance and cyberwarfare/terrorism, and responses and remedies to cybersecurity concerns. Included are detailed analyses of significant cybersecurity current events plus review of applicable international standards, and federal and state laws and cases.</div><div>AWR is possible.</div><div>Method of evaluation:  The grade will be based on a final paper and brief exercises.</div>GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1647
CLI9302http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1648CLI9302Environmental and Natural Resources Law ClinicMears,David<div>The Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic functions as a public interest environmental law firm with a collegial atmosphere that encourages interaction and feedback among students and Clinic faculty.  Under the supervision of experienced environmental attorneys, student clinicians represent community groups and conservation organizations in real-world cases and projects.  Although the Clinic experience varies from student to student depending on the cases and projects assigned, the range of typical experiences includes: communicating with clients, experts, agency personnel, and opposing parties; conducting site visits; investigating scientific, technical, and other factual information; gathering public records using FOIA and state public record laws; engaging in specialized legal research; drafting and filing court briefs and pleadings in compliance with local court rules; conducting written and oral discovery; analyzing complex legal and factual materials; developing legal theories, claims, and arguments; engaging in strategic decision-making; negotiating with opposing parties and crafting settlement agreements; complying with ethical and professional standards; and, sometimes, appearing in court.  The goal of the clinical experience is to develop well-rounded professionals with a high degree of skill and judgment grounded in service to clients and respect for the environment and the rule of law. </div><div>Classroom Component and Clinic Hours: Required classes two days/week—one hour fifteen minutes each class.  Generally each week, one class is Case Review and one class is Seminar.  Students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the required two/days a week ENRLC classes.  A student’s schedule for the student’s other Clinic hours will be determined by the individual student in consultation with clinical faculty at the beginning of the semester.</div><div>Legal Profession is strongly recommended, but not required, for students enrolling in any Clinic term.  In addition, during the selection process, priority may be given to students who have successfully completed Environmental Law (or another substantive environmental law course).</div><div>Registration: The ENRLC follows the common application process for clinics.  Notices are sent to the student body near the beginning of each semester about the common application process; this information is also available on the ENRLC’s website.  Recruitment for the Fall semester occurs in the spring.  Recruitment for the Spring semester occurs in the fall.  Recruitment for the Summer term occurs in the fall and, if there are remaining slots, again in the spring.  The Clinic conducts interviews with interested applicants.  If a student is selected for the ENRLC by clinical faculty, the ENRLC will provide the Registrar’s Office with a list of all accepted applicants and the Registrar will register them for the course.  Because of the full-time nature of the 13-credit option, students taking the ENRLC for 13 credits may not register for another course without the express consent of the Director of the Clinic.  Summer term: the Summer term is full-time for all students regardless of credit status, and students may select 0, 6, or 9 credits.</div>6913.00000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1648
CLI9310http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1649CLI9310South Royalton Legal Clinic FTMay,James<div>Students work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel.  Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners.  Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship.  Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and investigate cases, draft pleadings and memoranda, participate in negotiations, and conduct evidentiary and appellate hearings, all under the supervision of one of the Clinic’s attorneys.  <br>It is recommended that students take Evidence and/or Trial Practice prior to enrolling in the Clinic, but neither is required.</div><div>Classroom component:<br><br>Registration:  You must apply to enroll in SRLC through the VLS Clinical Communication application system.<br>Assessment of students’ performance in the classroom portion and representation of clients will be made by the Clinic faculty on a pass/fail basis (“pass honors” and “low pass” are other possible designations).  <br>NOTE: Part-time and full-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the Clinic’s introductory session; they should also realize that occasional conflicts may arise between court hearings (and similar commitments) and daytime classes, in which case client obligations prevail.  <br>Satisfies Experiential requirement.</div>10.0000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1649
CLI9312http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1650CLI9312South Royalton Legal Clinic PTMay,James<div>Classroom component:<br>Fall 2016-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks:  8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held as scheduled Monday – Friday for the first 5 weeks.  There are 5 consecutive class days to start; after that 11 (eleven) class days are spread throughout the following 4 weeks.<br>Registration:  You must apply to enroll in SRLC through the VLS Clinical Communication application system.<br>Assessment of students’ performance in the classroom portion and representation of clients will be made by the Clinic faculty on a pass/fail basis (“pass honors” and “low pass” are other possible designations).  <br>NOTE: Part-time and full-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the Clinic’s introductory session; they should also realize that occasional conflicts may arise between court hearings (and similar commitments) and daytime classes, in which case client obligations prevail.  <br>Satisfies Experiential requirement.</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1650
CLI9315http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1651CLI9315South Royalton Legal Clinic Class A & BMay, James<div>Classroom component:<br>Fall 2016-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks:  8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held as scheduled Monday – Friday for the first 5 weeks.  There are 5 consecutive class days to start; after that 11 (eleven) class days are spread throughout the following 4 weeks.<br>Registration:  You must apply to enroll in SRLC through the VLS Clinical Communication application system.<br>Assessment of students’ performance in the classroom portion and representation of clients will be made by the Clinic faculty on a pass/fail basis (“pass honors” and “low pass” are other possible designations).  <br>NOTE: Part-time and full-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the Clinic’s introductory session; they should also realize that occasional conflicts may arise between court hearings (and similar commitments) and daytime classes, in which case client obligations prevail.  <br>Satisfies Experiential requirement.</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1651
CLI9326http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1652CLI9326Advanced EnvNat ResLaw Clinic 6Mears, David<div>Advanced ENRLC provides students an opportunity to take the Clinic for a second semester and build on their previous ENRLC experiences.  Students will further develop their understanding of relevant substantive law and the lawyering skills introduced in the initial Clinic course.  They will be expected to take greater responsibility for counseling clients, developing cases, and reaching resolutions consistent with client goals.  They will also be expected to help novice clinicians approach the work of the Clinic.  In pursuing these advanced competencies, students will develop their leadership and decision-making skills and gain greater insight into the challenges and rewards of professional practice.  </div><div>Classroom Component and Clinic Hours: Required classes two days/week—one hour fifteen minutes each class.  Generally each week, one class is Case Review and one class is Seminar.  Though Advanced ENRLC students will not be required to participate in every Seminar, they are required to participate in every Case Review.  Students who enroll in Advanced ENRLC may not enroll in courses that conflict with the two/days a week ENRLC classes.  A student’s schedule for the student’s other Clinic hours will be determined by the individual student in consultation with clinical faculty at the beginning of the semester. </div><div>Prerequisite: ENRLC.</div><div>Registration: Only by permission of the ENRLC Director.  A student interested in Advanced ENRLC should speak with clinical faculty about doing the Clinic for a second semester.  Selection is dependent upon space, case needs, and the student’s previous record in the Clinic.  If the student is selected for Advanced ENRLC, the ENRLC will provide the Registrar’s Office with the student’s name, and the Registrar will register the student.</div>6.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1652
CLI9329http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1653CLI9329Advanced EnvNat ResLaw Clinic 9Mears, David<div>Advanced ENRLC provides students an opportunity to take the Clinic for a second semester and build on their previous ENRLC experiences.  Students will further develop their understanding of relevant substantive law and the lawyering skills introduced in the initial Clinic course.  They will be expected to take greater responsibility for counseling clients, developing cases, and reaching resolutions consistent with client goals.  They will also be expected to help novice clinicians approach the work of the Clinic.  In pursuing these advanced competencies, students will develop their leadership and decision-making skills and gain greater insight into the challenges and rewards of professional practice.  </div><div>Classroom Component and Clinic Hours: Required classes two days/week—one hour fifteen minutes each class.  Generally each week, one class is Case Review and one class is Seminar.  Though Advanced ENRLC students will not be required to participate in every Seminar, they are required to participate in every Case Review.  Students who enroll in Advanced ENRLC may not enroll in courses that conflict with the two/days a week ENRLC classes.  A student’s schedule for the student’s other Clinic hours will be determined by the individual student in consultation with clinical faculty at the beginning of the semester. </div><div>Prerequisite: ENRLC.</div><div>Registration: Only by permission of the ENRLC Director.  A student interested in Advanced ENRLC should speak with clinical faculty about doing the Clinic for a second semester.  Selection is dependent upon space, case needs, and the student’s previous record in the Clinic.  If the student is selected for Advanced ENRLC, the ENRLC will provide the Registrar’s Office with the student’s name, and the Registrar will register the student.</div>9.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1653
CLI9333http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1654CLI9333ADV South Royalton Legal Clinic 13May, James<div>Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.</div>13.0000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1654
CLI9336http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1655CLI9336Advanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 6<div>Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.</div>6.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1655
CLI9339http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1656CLI9339Advanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 9May, James<div>Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.</div>9.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1656
CLI9405http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1657CLI9405Dispute Resolution ClinicBarone,RobinThis clinical offering trains students to mediate. While training, students observe and will later conduct mediations in various Vermont and New Hampshire courts. The course begins with an intensive skills session in the form of a day-long training session scheduled for Monday, January 9th before the start of spring classes. Attendance at this session is MANDATORY. Students interested in taking the course MUST attend the Monday session. No exceptions can be made. There will also be one Saturday training session, presently scheduled for February 4th. This session is also mandatory. Weekly seminars will focus on course readings regarding conflict theory, mediation techniques, litigation strategies, public policy and social justice issues, as well as ethical and licensing concerns. A portion of each class will be devoted to clinic-style rounds, enabling students to present the cases they have observed or mediated for discussion and feedback. Students will be asked to analyze mediation practice and conflict theory from the various perspectives of mediator, attorney advocate, parties and client. Professor Barone administers small claims mediation programs in two New Hampshire courts (Lebanon District Court and Littleton District Court). Students will be able to observe and later mediate in those courts. (Vermont small claims court mediation programs are currently suspended for budgetary reasons.) Professor Barone will also arrange shadowing opportunities with practicing Vermont attorney-mediators, so that the students can observe civil mediations at the Superior Court level. Students will need to provide their own transportation to and from the various courts throughout Vermont, and/or to Lebanon NH and Littleton NH. Method of Evaluation: Pass/Fail (Does not satisfy AWR) MELP: Distributional requirement - Alternative Dispute Resolution. This is a limited enrollment course (8)4.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMonday, January 9 and February 41657
CLI9411http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1658CLI9411Semester In PracticeWhite, Jeffry<div>The Semester in Practice (SiP) Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice.  The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional who are experienced lawyers or professionals with a JD (where appropriate) who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The SiP provides an opportunity – through observation, participation, practice, and reflection – to improve students’ legal knowledge and skills and to inform and expand their vision of what the practice and profession of law can be.</div><div>Components and Requirements of the SiP Course:  There are two different components to the SiP program:  a practicum component and a classroom component.  Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program.  For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site attorney supervisor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.  All students are required to participate in a five-day on-line orientation prior to the first day of work on-site.</div><div>Credits and Grading:  Students enrolled in the full time program work for 15 weeks, full-time according to the schedule of their assigned office, and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits.  Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded.</div><div>Eligibility:</div><div>1.      Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate.</div><div>2.      Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form).</div><div>Application Deadlines:</div><div>1.      In order to participate in a Fall SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st.</div><div>2.      In order to participate in a Spring SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.</div><div>Satisfies the skills requirement.</div>11.0000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1658
CLI9412http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1659CLI9412Semester In Practice ClassWhite, Jeffry<div>The Semester in Practice (SiP) Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice.  The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional who are experienced lawyers or professionals with a JD (where appropriate) who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The SiP provides an opportunity – through observation, participation, practice, and reflection – to improve students’ legal knowledge and skills and to inform and expand their vision of what the practice and profession of law can be.</div><div>Components and Requirements of the SiP Course:  There are two different components to the SiP program:  a practicum component and a classroom component.  Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program.  For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site attorney supervisor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.  All students are required to participate in a five-day on-line orientation prior to the first day of work on-site.</div><div>Credits and Grading:  Students enrolled in the full time program work for 15 weeks, full-time according to the schedule of their assigned office, and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits.  Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded.</div><div>Eligibility:</div><div>1.      Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate.</div><div>2.      Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form).</div><div>Application Deadlines:</div><div>1.      In order to participate in a Fall SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st.</div><div>2.      In order to participate in a Spring SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.</div><div>Satisfies the skills requirement.</div>2.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1659
CLI9425http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1660CLI9425JD PT ExternshipWhite, Jeffry<div>The Part-Time JD Externship Program is a field-based externship in which student’s apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice.  The part-time externship program is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional working with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The Part-Time Externship provides students an opportunity to participate in a range of lawyering tasks so that they develop an improved understanding of the legal process and of legal problems at all stages of resolution.</div><div>Components and Requirements of the Part-Time JD Externship Course:  There are two different components to the Part-Time JD Externship program:  a practicum component and an academic component.  Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program.  For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site attorney supervisor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.    A mandatory seminar component is included with pass/fail evaluation and there is no additional credit for the seminar. The Externship faculty has the option on a semester by semester basis of doing either individual conference sessions or regular classroom sessions. All students are required to participate in an orientation during the first week of the externship semester.</div><div>Credits and Grading:  Students enrolled in the part-time program must work three hours per week, on average, for 15 weeks for each credit earned.  For example, a six credit externship requires 2.4 days or 18 hours of work per week.  Students may earn from four to six credits depending on the time committed.  Students take classes on-campus during the semester in addition to participating in a JD externship.</div><div>Eligibility:</div><div>1.      Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate.</div><div>2.      Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form).</div><div>Application Deadlines:</div><div>1.      In order to participate in a Fall Part-Time JD Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by April 1st.</div><div>2.      In order to participate in a Spring Part-Time JD Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.</div><div>Satisfies the skills requirement.</div>4.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1660
CLI9427http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1661CLI9427Energy ClinicJones,Kevin<div>Through this course students will be introduced to the practical aspects of real world energy projects. Students will become involved in some aspect of the development or evaluation of real life energy projects (e.g. solar PV, energy efficiency, electric vehicle infrastructure) and may have the opportunity to support the legal and policy requirements of a particular project or through the development of model legal documents to facilitate future projects. Students will be introduced to the state and federal statutes, rules, tax codes, and ordinances that apply to the development of energy projects particularly those that promote sustainability at the community level. Given the project development cycle while students may only be involved in one or more transactional elements of the project the goal of the course will be to also provide a framework for understanding how their specific component fits within the complete project cycle. Specific projects undertaken by the energy clinic will be selected in order to support some social justice or environmental benefit including community ownership, greenhouse gas reduction, or low income energy affordability goals. Classroom instruction will be through IEE faculty, fellows, and guest lecturers.</div>4.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1661
CLI9428http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1662CLI9428Food & Agriculture ClinicRenner,Jamie<div>Clinic: In the Food and Agriculture Clinic, students collaborate with local, regional, national and international partner organizations to develop and publicly disseminate law, policy and market tools that provide guidance to food system constituencies, including farmers, food entrepreneurs, consumers, legislators, and advocates, on how to advance law, policy and market initiatives that directly or indirectly promote (1) environmentally and economically sustainable agriculture, (2) public health, (3) food access and food security, (4) local and regional agriculture economies and (5) animal welfare. Student clinicians participate in all aspects of project development and execution, gaining experience in both advocacy and the business behind it. Skills practiced in the clinic — including problem solving, cross-professional collaboration, legal research, legal writing, project management, legal resource design, interviewing, public speaking, media and marketing — are transferable to any advocacy context.</div> <div> Method of evaluation: Clinic is high pass/low pass/fail. </div>4.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1662
CLI9429http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1663CLI9429Food and Agriculture SeminarRenner,Jamie<div></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1663
CLI9430http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1664CLI9430Judicial ExternshipWhite, Jeffry<div>The Judicial Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) in judicial chambers.  The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial law clerk.  The Judicial Externship will provide students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develop writing, research and analytical skills.</div><div>Components and Requirements of the Judicial Externship:  There are two different components to the Judicial Externship:  a practicum component and a classroom component.  Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program.  For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site judicial supervisor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.  All students are required to participate in a one-day orientation prior to the first day of work on-site.</div><div>Credits and Grading:  Students enrolled in the judicial externship program work for 15 weeks, full-time according to the court's schedule, and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits.  Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded.</div><div>Eligibility:</div><div>1.      Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate.</div><div>2.      Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form).</div><div>Application Deadlines:</div><div>1.      In order to participate in a Fall Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st.</div><div>2.      In order to participate in a Spring Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.</div><div>Satisfies the skills requirement.<br></div>11.0000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1664
CLI9431http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1665CLI9431Judicial SeminarWhite, Jeffry<div>The Judicial Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) in judicial chambers.  The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial law clerk.  The Judicial Externship will provide students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develop writing, research and analytical skills.</div><div>Components and Requirements of the Judicial Externship:  There are two different components to the Judicial Externship:  a practicum component and a classroom component.  Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program.  For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site judicial supervisor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.  All students are required to participate in a one-day orientation prior to the first day of work on-site.</div><div>Credits and Grading:  Students enrolled in the judicial externship program work for 15 weeks, full-time according to the court's schedule, and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits.  Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded.</div><div>Eligibility:</div><div>1.      Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate.</div><div>2.      Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form).</div><div>Application Deadlines:</div><div>1.      In order to participate in a Fall Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st.</div><div>2.      In order to participate in a Spring Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.</div><div>Satisfies the skills requirement.</div>2.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1665
CLI9437http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1666CLI9437Advanced Energy ClinicJones,Kevin<div>The Advanced Energy Clinic explores at an advanced level, the practical aspects of real world energy projects from the stage of conceptualization, development, contracting, financing, regulatory approval and construction.  Students will be further exposed to the state and federal statutes, rules, tax codes, and ordinances that apply to the development of energy projects particularly those that promote sustainability at the community level.  Students will also review and/or develop purchased power and other commercial agreements governing these projects.  Current project areas include community solar development and other alternative energy systems.  Advanced Energy Clinic students will play a leadership role in managing project teams and interfacing with clients.  Classroom instruction will be through IEE faculty, fellows, and guest lecturers.   This course is offered in the summer, fall and spring semesters.<br> <br>The Energy Clinic and Energy Policy in a Carbon Constrained World (ENV5226) are prerequisites for this course.  Application through the common clinic application and/or instructor approval is required.</div>4.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1666
CRI7307http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1667CRI7307Criminal Practice and ProcedureSaxman,Anna<div>The course will focus on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and the 4th, 5th, 6th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Students will examine the constitutional principles of criminal procedure and how those principles are actually utilized in practice. This course will give students the basic understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional criminal law and procedure while at the same time learning the practical application of theory to practice. The course curriculum will focus attention on: bail, search and seizure, the right against self-incrimination and involuntary confessions, discovery, Double Jeopardy,  Confrontation Clause,  the right to effective assistance of counsel, judgment of acquittal motions,  jury instructions and sentencing. Students will have the opportunity to draft and argue motions in criminal pre-trial and trial litigation. This course is a blend of the practical and theoretical, and students can expect to leave this class knowing how to analyze factual scenarios using constitutional criminal law cases and the Rules. Students will be expected to argue motions in front of the class as well as serve as judges ruling on the motions made in class. Students will have the opportunity to improve their legal analysis, writing and oral argument skills.</div>4.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1667
CRI7350http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1668CRI7350Criminal Law ClinicSaxman, Anna<div>This course gives students the opportunity to experience criminal practice in either prosecution or defense settings under the close supervision of our distinguished practitioner-faculty members.  Students will be placed in the prosecution, defense or appellate defense practice settings, and will receive classroom instruction once per week for two hours covering foundational aspects of Vermont criminal.  Students will then apply classroom concepts in real criminal cases, working under close supervision of the classroom faculty, Anna Saxman (Vermont Deputy Defender General) David Cahill (Deputy State’s Attorney, WRJ) and Brian Marsicovetere (Marsicovetere Law Group, PC) contracted to provide public defender services in Windsor County).<br>This is a 6 credit course:<br>2 credit hours of classroom – once a week for 2 hours; and<br>4 credit hours of clinic work – twice a week, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, for a total of 13 hours.<br>The course will be graded High Pass/Pass/Low Pass/Fail.<br>Enrollment is limited to 6 students.<br>This course satisfies the skills requirement.<br>Placements will be distributed as follows:<br>              Windsor County State’s Attorney’s Office (2 students)  Students will co-prosecute DUI and other misdemeanor cases.  Motions will be filed in court to admit students under the student practice rule.  Practical experience will include taking depositions, responding to, drafting, and arguing motions, examining and cross examining witnesses and participating in jury selection and trial.<br>Vermont Office of Defender General/ Appellate Defense (2 students)<br>            Students will be assigned 1 to 2 cases per semester. They will read the record, analyze the facts and the law, research, draft, and ultimately write the appellate brief in the case. The students may return to argue their cases before the Vermont Supreme Court the following semester under the student practice rules. <br>            Marsicovetere Law Group, PC/ Public Defender (2 students) Students in the clinic will be assigned specific misdemeanor cases and will be closely supervised throughout the process of each case, arraignment through disposition.  Students will experience the discovery process, research and draft applicable motions to suppress, dismiss, or compel further discovery, and, depending on the complexity of the motion, take part in the hearing accompanied by a supervising attorney.  If applicable, they will work on settlement negotiations with the state.  If the case proceeds on a trial track, then they will work with the supervising attorney in all aspects of trial preparation.</div>6.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1668
DIV7620http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1669DIV7620Native AmericansHoffmann, Hillary<div>This course will focus on the constitutional, statutory and jurisprudential rules that make up the field of Federal Indian Law.  Attention will be given to the historical framework from which the rules were derived.  After tracing the development of the underlying legal doctrines which are prominent today, we will consider subject-specific areas of Indian Law like hunting and fishing rights, stewardship of natural resources, economic development (including tribal gaming and natural resource development) and protection of religion and cultural lifestyles.  <br> <br>Method of evaluation:  A final presentation and a final paper, or a fin</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1669
ENV5105http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1670ENV5105Administrative Law<div>Administrative law is the law relating to administrative agencies, which almost every practicing lawyer or policy advocate encounters at one or more points in her career.  This class focuses on federal agencies - what they are (executive or independent), what they do (adjudicate, regulate, or investigate), and what constrains their authority (the Constitution, Congress, and the judiciary).  Lawyers and policy advisors who work for agencies, regulated industries, and public interest groups should understand these basic principles of administrative law in order to work as effective advocates. This course uses a problem focus to stress practical application of administrative law. </div><div>Method of evaluation:  Midterm exam and final exam; or midterm exam, final paper and final presentation. </div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bHoffmann,Hillary1670
ENV5115http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1672ENV5115Environmental Law Mears,David<div>This is a survey course that will introduce students to the basic concepts of U.S. environmental law.  Students will trace the development of this complex and diverse body of law from its common law origins through the development of modern statutory and regulatory programs.  Goals of the course include (1) familiarity with the major federal environmental laws, their underpinnings in the common law, and the competing approaches to public policy reflected in each statute, (2) understanding of the cooperative federal-state governance structure and administrative law framework as applied in U.S. environmental law, and exposure to and the opportunity to practice skills used in environmental law including public speaking, advocacy, legal analysis, writing, receiving and providing feedback on work product, negotiating resolutions of disputes, and the application of legal process.  Themes in the course include global climate disruption, interdisciplinary approaches to environmental problem-solving, the role of the ethical attorney in environmental disputes and environmental justice.  Students will explore environmental law through reading case law, statutes, regulations and articles.</div><div>Method of Evaluation:  Writing assignments, class participation and in class final examination<br>AWR:  No </div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1672
ENV5205http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1673ENV5205Air Pollution Law and PolicyScott,Jessica<div>This course will cover the major regulatory approaches embodied in the Clean Air Act, including health-based ambient standards, technology-based standards, joint state-federal implementation under the principle of "cooperative federalism," direct EPA regulation using industry-by-industry approaches, pollution trading programs, permitting, and enforcement. The primary focus of the course will be on stationary source pollution, with a brief introduction to mobile source pollution. Students will be expected to read the statutory and regulatory provisions carefully, and to consider the science and policies which animate them. The course will require students to take an in-depth look at how the statute and regulations are implemented, both administratively and through the courts. As a foundation for interpreting and applying the Clean Air Act, students will learn about the health and environmental impacts of ozone, fine particulates, hazardous air pollutants, acid rain, and climate change, as well as the technologies used to address them. Air Pollution is a specialized environmental law course most suitable for students who already have some experience with administrative law and environmental law. MELP and JD-MELP Joint Degree students who have completed Environmental Law should have a sufficient background for this course.</div> <div>JD-only students are strongly encouraged to take Administrative Law and Environmental Law before enrolling in Air Pollution.</div> <div>Method of evaluation: in-class exam.</div> <div>AWR: no.</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1673
ENV5220http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1674ENV5220Env Economics/MarketJones, Kevin<div>The course introduces students to the discipline of environmental economics and exposes them to debates over the use of market-based instruments in environmental, energy, and climate policy. It introduces students to basic economics and finance concepts, examines key principles about market behavior and efficiency, and applies these basic elements and concepts to common environmental problems. Economic concepts are applied to environmental and natural resource policy areas including water resources, energy, food and agriculture, land use, forests, as well as, air and water pollution.  </div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1674
ENV5228http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1675ENV5228Energy Regulation & the EnvironmentJones, Kevin<div>This course builds on the fall course Energy Law and Policy in a Carbon-Constrained World. The course exposes students to the legal, economic, and environmental policy issues involved in both energy regulation and competitive energy markets, focusing on electricity. The course examines the evolution, theory and techniques of rate of return regulation and explains how utilities are regulated, including alternative regulatory models. The course then examines evolving competitive, wholesale electricity markets including the development of Regional Transmission Organizations and rules and practice of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission.  Topics studied include transmission expansion for renewable energy, demand response, and the emergence of distributed energy resources.  Finally, the course exposes students to the law, policy and markets for clean energy including energy efficiency, renewable portfolio standards, net metering, renewable energy credits and other emerging policies.<br> <br>Prerequisites: Energy Law and Policy or Instructor's Permission.</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1675
ENV5239http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1676ENV5239Land TransactionsEcheverria, John<div></div>GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1676
ENV5246http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1677ENV5246Water QualityParenteau, Pat<div>This course takes an in depth look at the Clean Water Act and related statutes such as the Safe Drinking Water Act, The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (“Ocean Dumping Act”) and the Coastal Zone Management Act. Common law remedies are also considered. Guest speakers will provide additional perspectives.<br> <br>Method of Evaluation:  One commentary (1000 words) and take-home final take home.  <br>AWR (No)<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1677
ENV5250http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1678ENV5250Watershed ManagementScanlan,Melissa<div>This is a capstone course for the water curriculum. It will involve a weekly class seminar and two day-long field trips, a major paper, and a presentation. We have managed to create a dizzying patchwork of water management laws that span local, state and federal jurisdictions.  We manage ground and surface water, point and non-point source pollution differently. We have a TMDL process that in many key respects remains unenforceable in court.  Yet we have managed to clean up a large number of our nation's waters, and in many parts of the country stakeholders are striving to address the hydrological realities of watershed protection in spite of the lack of a coherent legal framework to do so.  This class will first explore the patchwork of overlapping laws and jurisdictions and then explore some of the creative solutions, by focusing on a series of actual watershed case studies. This class will meet on Tuesdays, 11:20 – 12:35, throughout the semester. There will also be two required, all-day field trips on Friday, March 31 and Friday, April 7. <br>Prerequisite: Water Resources, Water Quality (co-requisite) <br>Method of evaluation:  Paper, presentation and AWR (yes) </div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1678
ENV5303http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1679ENV5303Advanced Energy SeminarDworkin,Michael<div>This seminar provides students an opportunity to produce a significant written paper based on sophisticated research and thinking about a key area in energy policy and law. Seminar topics include proposals for reducing the economic and environmental costs of meeting energy needs. Efforts to reduce costs through more efficient delivery and end-use are assessed, with specific attention to the statutory, regulatory, and contractual techniques for creating sound incentives.</div>2.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1679
ENV5305http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1680ENV5305Environmental EthicsLoder, Reed<div>This seminar examines the values and ethical assumptions in problem solving about the environment, enabling students to perfect their reasoning about environmental law and policy.  It introduces various ethical approaches to resolving environmental problems, including:  intrinsic value, biocentrism, utilitarianism, eco-feminism, deep ecology, social ecology, eco-centric, and religious/spiritual.  These ethical foundations are applied to concrete environmental policy issues, covering aspects of species and place restoration, climate change, relationships of humans to the non-human world, global justice, and responsibilities to future generations.  A central goal of the course is to assist students in developing and refining a personal and professional environmental ethic.<br> <br>Course materials include interdisciplinary readings on the environment in philosophy, religion, law, natural science, and literature.  Students prepare a seminar paper and present their work to the class.  Students may take the seminar for 2 or 3 credits, and requirements vary depending on credits elected.<br> <br>Method of evaluation:  Seminar paper and presentation to the class.  (Requirements vary depending on credits elected 2 or 3 credits.)<br> <br>Perspective requirement.<br> MELP ethics distribution requirement.</div>2.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1680
ENV5342http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1681ENV5342Legal Adaptation to Global WarmingEcheverria,John<div>Adaptation is a necessary and unavoidable complement to mitigation measures required to address the challenge of climate change. Legal Adaptation to Climate Change addresses how rising sea levels, higher temperatures, changes in precipitation and other physical consequences of climate change will put pressure on established laws and legal institutions that were developed based on the assumption of a stable climate. The course will also explore potential new legal and policy tools for maintaining economic, social, political and environmental security in dramatically changing circumstances. The course explores climate change adaptation in both the domestic and international contexts.</div> <div> Method of evaluation: Final paper; AWR (yes)</div>2.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1681
ENV5375http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1682ENV5375Global Energy JusticeDworkin,Michael<div>This course revolves around a central questions: how can justice theory help people make meaningful decisions about the production, the delivery, the use and the effects of energy?</div>2.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1682