Summer at the Center for Justice Reform

Summer training for students, interested lawyers, professionals, and engaged citizens. We are educating the next generation of justice leaders.

The Center for Justice Reform offers students flexible course options with five residential and three online courses. If looking to earn your Master of Arts in Restorative Justice (MARJ), Joint JD/MARJ degree, Professional Certificate in Restorative Justice, or transfer credits to another institution, the restorative justice program will have something for you.

View all available residential and online course options below.

Residential Courses (3 Credits)

RSJ 7330.1/Restorative Justice in Educational Institutions

This course explores how restorative justice approaches can provide important alternatives to more traditional responses to harm within educational settings. Restorative justice has three primary applications in school settings, which includes both K-12 schools and higher education. Restorative circles are commonly used to build and strengthen relationships between students and with their teachers. Restorative practices help develop “social-emotional learning.” Restorative conferences are used in response to conflict and misconduct.

Professor(s)

Marilyn Armour

Semester

2020 Justice Reform - Term 1

ENV5902.03/Environmental Crimes

Forthcoming.

Professor(s)

Deborah Harris

Semester

2020 Summer - Term 2

ENV5902.1/Environmental Crimes

Professor(s)

Deborah Harris

Semester

2020 Summer - Term 2

ENV5446/Environmental Justice

The environmental justice movement is aimed at avoiding, minimizing, or mitigating disproportionately adverse human health and environmental impacts, including social and economic impacts, on minority and/or low-income communities, and for those communities to be engaged meaningfully in environmental decision-making processes. This course examines this environmental and public health problem.

Professor(s)

Barry Hill

Semester

2020 Summer - Term 2

ENV5902.01/Food Impact Litigation

This course examines the potential and limitations of litigation against the industrial agriculture system. We will touch on the most common causes of action used in federal courts, as well as several new theories good food movement advocates are testing. In considering these approaches we will discuss their legal elements and remedies, how they can be used to advance a narrative about the current food system, and the ways in which they might be combined with policy advocacy.

Professor(s)

David Muraskin

Semester

2020 Summer - Term 2

ENV5230/Global Energy Law and Policy

Climate Change, driven by greenhouse gas emission coming from energy is one of the most important environmental problems that we face today. Latin America, with 590 million inhabitants, is responsible for 9% of greenhouse gas emissions globally. 80% of those emissions come from four countries; Brazil Venezuela, Mexico and Argentina. 42% of the GHG emissions come from energy. It is estimated that if global temperature rise by 2,5 C, the effect on GDP could be as much as 5% of Regional GDP.

Professor(s)

Arturo Brandt LLM '04

Semester

2020 Summer - Term 2

ENV5474/Land Conservation Law

This course examines the potential and limitations of litigation against the industrial agriculture system. We will touch on the most common causes of action used in federal courts, as well as several new theories good food movement advocates are testing. In considering these approaches we will discuss their legal elements and remedies, how they can be used to advance a narrative about the current food system, and the ways in which they might be combined with policy advocacy.

Professor(s)

Jessica Jay '97

Semester

2020 Summer - Term 2

ENV5472/Law of Ecosystem Management

The concept of ecosystem management is sweeping through federal and state resource agencies, altering their orientation toward resource use and conservation issues, but what is the law of ecosystem management? This course explores that question beginning with an introduction to the concept of ecosystem management—its history, principles, and current state of play in concrete policy settings.

Professor(s)

J.B. Ruhl, James Salzman

Semester

2020 Summer - Term 2

RSJ7315.1/Peacemaking Courts

Professor(s)

Semester

2020 Summer - Term 2

RSJ/Restorative Justice in Indigenous Communities

This course will focus on how indigenous people from many countries and cultures respond to conflict and harm. The course will consider how contemporary restorative practices find roots in the approaches from indigenous people.

Professor(s)

N. Bruce Duthu

Semester

2019 Justice Reform - Term 2

RSJ/Restorative Justice in Educational Institutions

This course explores how restorative justice approaches can provide important alternatives to more traditional responses to harm within educational settings. Restorative justice has three primary applications in school settings, which includes both K-12 schools and higher education. Restorative circles are commonly used to build and strengthen relationships between students and with their teachers. Restorative practices help develop “social-emotional learning.” Restorative conferences are used in response to conflict and misconduct.

Professor(s)

David Karp

Semester

2019 Justice Reform - Term 3

RSJ/New Approaches to Domestic and Sexual Violence

This course will address how we respond to domestic and sexual violence, the shortcomings to our current approach, and explore meaningful alternatives to our current responses. The course will consider the political, cultural, and legal factors that are influencing shifting attitudes toward crimes of interpersonal violence.

Professor(s)

Leigh Goodmark, Donna Coker

Semester

2019 Justice Reform - Term 4

Four Week Residential Course (2 Credits)

RSJ/Advanced Restorative Justice Practices

The Advanced Restorative Practices course teaches students how to design, prepare for, and facilitate a variety of restorative practices. Students will learn from restorative justice experts and then design and lead simulated restorative practices on their own. Students will be graded on a High Pass, Pass, Low Pass, Fail basis. The Principles of Restorative Justice or Origins, Evolution and Critical Issues course (described above) is a prerequisite for this course.

Professor(s)

Jon Kidde

Semester

2019 Justice Reform - Friday's Only

Online CourseS (2 Credits)

RSJ/Advanced Writing Seminar

This seminar provides an opportunity to explore emerging issues in justice reform through research and writing.

Professor(s)

Greg Johnson

Semester

2019 Justice Reform - Online

RSJ/Global Restorative Justice

This course will consider how other places and countries have adopted and utilized restorative practices to address systemic harm. The location or locations that form the basis of the semester will depend on the expertise of the professor. The initial time this course will be offered it will focus on “Recent Advances in Rwanda.”

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Justice Reform - Online

RSJ/Narrative Writing Seminar

Today, being an advocate requires more than knowing how to write a brief. Fluency in a variety of written forms – memorandums, op-eds, letters, emails, blog posts – is all but required. This course will cover these forms and others. Students will be graded on regular written assignments and a final paper.

Professor(s)

Semester

2019 Justice Reform - Online