2016 Residential Summer Session Classes

ENV5344.A/Alternative Fuels and Renewable Energy

Our world is fundamentally dependent on energy flows, yet the fuels and sources that have sustained us for the last century all seem to be showing tight limits or tragic flaws. This course, taught by a former administrative law judge for the California Public Utility Commission, explores the emerging field of renewable and alternative energy supplies. It reviews local, state, and federal laws and policies that promote (and impede) such sources, and considers emerging distributed generation models.

Professor(s)

Clay Mitchell, Esq. PhD

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

ENV5212.A/Climate Change and the Law

Climate change is the most profound social and environmental issue of the 21st century. This course will integrate the emerging science and law of climate change along with economic and intergenerational equity aspects of the problem. We will consider how existing federal laws such as the Clean Air Act and NEPA may be used to address climate change as well as how new more comprehensive laws may be fashioned. Different policy instruments will be considered including carbon taxes and emissions trading.

Professor(s)

Shalanda H. Baker

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

ENV5122.A/Communication, Advocacy and Leadership

A successful environmental professional should possess the ability to advocate, counsel, investigate, persuade, research, and educate. This course will develop those skills through various writing and oral advocacy projects. In addition to other writing projects, students will compose a Freedom of Information Act request, draft a public comment letter, write a grant proposal letter of inquiry, and create an environmental communication campaign. Different skills will be emphasized through the exploration of these diverse types of writing.

Professor(s)

Jared Carter, Clay Francis

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

ENV5226.A/Energy Law and Policy in a Carbon-Constrained World

The energy industry is both a key to the life that billions seek and America's most significant source of pollution. Environmental problems are the energy industry's most important constraint. This course examines key issues in American energy policy, and searches for ways to resolve or ease the strains, which that policy puts upon environmental sustainability. We will review fundamental facts about our energy demands and sample regulatory orders and legal writings that address many of those elements from the perspective of a legal review.

Professor(s)

Donald M. Kreis

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

ENV5220.A/Environmental Economics and Markets

​​The course introduces students to the discipline of environmental economics and exposes them to debates over the use of market-based instruments in environmental, energy, and climate policy. It also introduces students to basic economics and finance concepts, examines key principles about market behavior and efficiency, and applies these basic elements and concepts to common environmental problems and actual case studies.​Approved for Master’s credit only.

Professor(s)

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

ENV5411.A/Federal Regulation of Food and Agriculture

This course provides an overview of the U.S. Farm Bill and other federal laws that impact growing policy, animal husbandry, and food production. Students will examine federal farm and agriculture law with specific emphasis on the Farm Bill and its myriad of agriculture, nutrition and environmental programs. This course will explore the ways in which the Farm Bill, the single largest funding source for everything from childhood nutrition to land trust acquisition, impacts everything from U.S. international policy stances to the availability of local food resources.

Professor(s)

Laurie Beyranevand '03

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

REQ7180.A/Public Law

This course introduces the fields of legal analysis, research, and writing through the study of environmental statutes and case law. It also explores research and investigatory techniques, citation form, legal reasoning, writing skills, and professionalism. The class begins with case briefing exercises that examine environmental law and its interaction with civil procedure, torts, criminal law, property, and constitutional law.

Professor(s)

Adrienne Soler '87

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

ENV5112.A/Science for Environmental Law

​Ecology is an integrative science that can provide insight into many contemporary environmental problems. Through visits to a variety of field sites in central Vermont, readings, and lectures, this course will explore the principles of ecology using a hands-on, interdisciplinary approach. Course work stresses the inventorying of biotic and physical components of a landscape (pieces), examining how these pieces are distributed (patterns), and determining what forces drive these patterns (processes).

Professor(s)

Ross Jones '00

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

ENV5344.A/Alternative Fuels and Renewable Energy

Our world is fundamentally dependent on energy flows, yet the fuels and sources that have sustained us for the last century all seem to be showing tight limits or tragic flaws. This course, taught by a former administrative law judge for the California Public Utility Commission, explores the emerging field of renewable and alternative energy supplies. It reviews local, state, and federal laws and policies that promote (and impede) such sources, and considers emerging distributed generation models.

Professor(s)

Clay Mitchell, Esq. PhD

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

ENV5212.A/Climate Change and the Law

Climate change is the most profound social and environmental issue of the 21st century. This course will integrate the emerging science and law of climate change along with economic and intergenerational equity aspects of the problem. We will consider how existing federal laws such as the Clean Air Act and NEPA may be used to address climate change as well as how new more comprehensive laws may be fashioned. Different policy instruments will be considered including carbon taxes and emissions trading.

Professor(s)

Shalanda H. Baker

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

ENV5122.A/Communication, Advocacy and Leadership

A successful environmental professional should possess the ability to advocate, counsel, investigate, persuade, research, and educate. This course will develop those skills through various writing and oral advocacy projects. In addition to other writing projects, students will compose a Freedom of Information Act request, draft a public comment letter, write a grant proposal letter of inquiry, and create an environmental communication campaign. Different skills will be emphasized through the exploration of these diverse types of writing.

Professor(s)

Jared Carter, Clay Francis

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

ENV5226.A/Energy Law and Policy in a Carbon-Constrained World

The energy industry is both a key to the life that billions seek and America's most significant source of pollution. Environmental problems are the energy industry's most important constraint. This course examines key issues in American energy policy, and searches for ways to resolve or ease the strains, which that policy puts upon environmental sustainability. We will review fundamental facts about our energy demands and sample regulatory orders and legal writings that address many of those elements from the perspective of a legal review.

Professor(s)

Donald M. Kreis

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

ENV5220.A/Environmental Economics and Markets

​​The course introduces students to the discipline of environmental economics and exposes them to debates over the use of market-based instruments in environmental, energy, and climate policy. It also introduces students to basic economics and finance concepts, examines key principles about market behavior and efficiency, and applies these basic elements and concepts to common environmental problems and actual case studies.​Approved for Master’s credit only.

Professor(s)

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

ENV5411.A/Federal Regulation of Food and Agriculture

This course provides an overview of the U.S. Farm Bill and other federal laws that impact growing policy, animal husbandry, and food production. Students will examine federal farm and agriculture law with specific emphasis on the Farm Bill and its myriad of agriculture, nutrition and environmental programs. This course will explore the ways in which the Farm Bill, the single largest funding source for everything from childhood nutrition to land trust acquisition, impacts everything from U.S. international policy stances to the availability of local food resources.

Professor(s)

Laurie Beyranevand '03

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

REQ7180.A/Public Law

This course introduces the fields of legal analysis, research, and writing through the study of environmental statutes and case law. It also explores research and investigatory techniques, citation form, legal reasoning, writing skills, and professionalism. The class begins with case briefing exercises that examine environmental law and its interaction with civil procedure, torts, criminal law, property, and constitutional law.

Professor(s)

Adrienne Soler '87

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL

ENV5112.A/Science for Environmental Law

​Ecology is an integrative science that can provide insight into many contemporary environmental problems. Through visits to a variety of field sites in central Vermont, readings, and lectures, this course will explore the principles of ecology using a hands-on, interdisciplinary approach. Course work stresses the inventorying of biotic and physical components of a landscape (pieces), examining how these pieces are distributed (patterns), and determining what forces drive these patterns (processes).

Professor(s)

Ross Jones '00

Semester

2015 Summer-1 DL