2016 Residential Spring Semester Classes

ENV5105.A/Administrative Law

Administrative law is the law relating to administrative agencies, which almost every practicing lawyer encounters at one or more points in her career.  This class focuses on federal agencies - what they are (executive or independent), what they do (adjudicate, regulate, or investigate), and what constrains their authority (the Constitution, Congress, and the judiciary).  Lawyers who work for agencies, regulated industries, and public interest groups must understand these basic principles of administrative law.

Professor(s)

Hillary Hoffmann

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9329.A/Adv Environmntal Natural Res. Clinic 9

Advanced Environmental Natural Resources Law Clinic.

Professor(s)

Doug Ruley

Semester

2016 Spring

WRI7360.A/Advanced Appellate Advocacy

Professor(s)

Beth McCormack

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9437.A/Advanced Energy Clinic

The Advanced Energy Clinic is a four credit course offered in the fall and/or spring semester.  Through this course students will explore at an advanced level, the practical aspects of real world energy projects (generation, transmission, distribution, and/or end-use) from the stage of conceptualization, development, contracting, financing regulatory approval and construction.  Students will be further exposed to the state and federal statutes, rules, tax codes, and ordinances that apply to the development of energy projects particularly those that promote sustainability at the community level

Professor(s)

Kevin B. Jones

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5303.A/Advanced Energy Writing Seminar

Seminar topics will include proposals for reducing the economic and environmental costs of meeting energy needs.  Because of its importance for both finance and emissions, the electricity sector will be a major focus of this class.  Weekly readings will focus on textual analysis of writings that have materially changed the world. Each student will need to produce a significant written paper based on sophisticated research and thinking about a key area in energy policy and law. Research projects  may be coordinated with (but must supplement) LL.M. or M.E.L.P.

Professor(s)

Michael Dworkin

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9326.A/Advanced Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic 6

Advanced Environmental Natural Resources Law Clinic.

Professor(s)

Doug Ruley

Semester

2016 Spring

WRI7352.A/Advanced Legal Analysis

Advanced Legal Analysis is a three-credit course designed to provide students with the analytical, test-taking, writing, and study skills that are critical to students' success on the bar exam. This is done through an intensive substantive and analytical review of major multistate bar exam subjects.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

WRI7344.A/Advanced Legal Research

This seminar builds on the introduction to legal research course by expanding students’ knowledge of available resources and research strategies. The seminar will cover topics such as statutory law including legislative history, administrative law, municipal law, and case law as well as secondary sources not covered in the introductory course.

Professor(s)

Jane Woldow

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9333.A/Advanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 13

Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.

Professor(s)

James C. May

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9336.A/Advanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 6

Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.

Professor(s)

James C. May

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9339.A/Advanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 9

Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.

Professor(s)

James C. May

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5401.A/Agricultural Environmental Law

This course is one of the foundational courses of the agriculture and food law and policy curriculum.

Professor(s)

Laurie Ristino

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5381.A/Agriculture and Food Entrepreneur Lawyering Skill

ENV 5381 Agriculture and Food Entrepreneurial Law teaches the nuts and bolts of providing legal services to farmers and food entrepreneurs (producers/retailers/restaurants), drawing from the rich examples of farmer and food entrepreneurs locally.

Professor(s)

Amy Manzelli, Beth Boepple

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5205.A/Air Pollution Law and Policy

This course will cover the major regulatory approaches embodied in the Clean Air Act, including health-based ambient standards, technology-based standards, joint state-federal implementation under the principle of "cooperative federalism," direct EPA regulation using industry-by-industry approaches, pollution trading programs, permitting, and enforcement. The primary focus of the course will be on stationary source pollution, with a brief introduction to mobile source pollution.

Professor(s)

Jessica Scott

Semester

2016 Spring

INT7432.A/Applied Human Rights

This advanced international human rights law course provides hands-on experiential learning in international human rights law and advocacy through work on client-based human rights projects for non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and inter-governmental organizations (IGOs).  Students will communicate regularly with their partner organization through email and Skype or similar platforms, and meet weekly as a group for lively classroom discussions of readings and of issues that arise in their project work.  The course exposes students to a range of lawyering competencies, using the project wor

Professor(s)

Stephanie Farrior

Semester

2016 Spring

GPP7823.A/Bankruptcy, Collections and Foreclosure

This course is an introduction to consumer bankruptcy, Vermont foreclosure practice and collection. The students learn the basic differences between the chapters of the bankruptcy code, and the impact a bankruptcy may have on the circumstances facing prospective clients.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7103.A/Civil Procedure II

Professor(s)

Sean Nolon

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7103.B/Civil Procedure II

Professor(s)

Pamela Stephens

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5306.A/Comparative Environmental Law Research

This seminar is a research and writing seminar that will provide a framework and faculty supervision for students to engage in comparative environmental law research. While the seminar is designed primarily to support VLS students participating in the U.S.-Asia environmental law research projects, the seminar is sufficiently broad to accommodate students interested in researching the environmental law systems of other countries.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

BUS6235.A/Corporations & Other Business Assoc.

This course will prepare you to understand and provide basic advice on different organizational forms for businesses, including corporations, limited liability companies, partnerships and sole proprietorships. We will also examine the law of agency. Course coverage will conclude with an introduction to securities regulation through the lens of insider trading.

Professor(s)

Mark Latham

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7140.A/Criminal Law

Professor(s)

Margaret Martin Barry

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7140.B/Criminal Law

Professor(s)

Robert Sand

Semester

2016 Spring

CRI7350.A/Criminal Law Clinic

This course gives students the opportunity to experience criminal practice in either prosecution or defense settings under the close supervision of our distinguished practitioner-faculty members.  Students will be placed in the prosecution, defense or appellate defense practice settings, and will receive classroom instruction once per week for two hours covering foundational aspects of Vermont criminal.  Students will then apply classroom concepts in real criminal cases, working under close supervision of the classroom faculty, Anna Saxman (Vermont Deputy Defender General) David Cahill (Deputy

Professor(s)

Anna Saxman '85

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9350.A/Criminal Law Clinic

Professor(s)

Anna Saxman '85

Semester

2016 Spring

CRI7307.A/Criminal Practice & Procedure

The course will focus on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and the 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Students will examine the constitutional principles of criminal procedure and how those principles are actually utilized in practice. This course will give students the basic understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional criminal law and procedure while at the same time learning the practical application of theory to practice.

Professor(s)

Anna Saxman '85

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9405.A/Dispute Resolution Clinic I

This clinical offering trains students to mediate. While training, students observe and will later conduct mediations in various Vermont and New Hampshire courts. The course begins with

Professor(s)

Robin Barone

Semester

2016 Spring

BUS6371.A/eLawyering: Cyber Security

Organizations and individuals face a multitude of complex threats to confidentiality, availability and integrity of their data and other information in today’s cyber environs.

Professor(s)

Mark Latham

Semester

2016 Spring

PUB7522.A/Election Law

This course uses legal and political science perspectives to examine legislative and judicial regulation of the political process.  It explores two main themes, namely, (1) how legislatures regulate campaigns, elections, and political participants, and (2) when courts should intervene in the political process.  Topics for study include the legacy of Bush v.

Professor(s)

Brian Porto

Semester

2016 Spring

BUS6245.A/Employment Law

Examines areas of federal and state labor law which regulate the employment relationship and which provide minimum protection outside of collective bargaining. Major topics considered include wrongful discharge, post-employment liability, employee privacy, genetic and drug testing, employment discrimination, and wage and hour law.
Method of evaluation:  Final exam

Professor(s)

Joan Vogel

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9427.A/Energy Clinic

Through this course students will be introduced to the practical aspects of real world energy projects.  Students will become involved in some aspect of the development or evaluation of real life energy projects (e.g.

Professor(s)

Kevin B. Jones

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5228.A/Energy Regulation and the Environment

This course builds on the fall course Energy Law and Policy in a Carbon-Constrained World. The course exposes students to the legal, economic, and structural issues involved in both energy regulation and energy markets, focusing on electricity. The course examines the evolution, theory and techniques of the monopoly regulation. Students learn how utilities are regulated. We examine rate setting, rate design and regulatory alternatives to traditional rates such as performance-based rates.

Professor(s)

Kevin B. Jones

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9302.A/Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic

The Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic functions as a public interest environmental law firm with a collegial atmosphere that encourages interaction and feedback among students and Clinic faculty. Under the supervision of experienced environmental attorneys, student clinicians represent community groups and conservation organizations in real-world cases and projects.

Professor(s)

Doug Ruley

Semester

2016 Spring

ADR6415.A/Environmental Dispute Resolution

Resolving environmental disputes is notoriously difficult.  These conflicts involve multiple parties, complicated factual matters and typically resist simple solutions.  In this course, students will explore these characteristics, investigate the full range of processes available to manage environmental disputes and assesses relevant policy and practical considerations of process selection.  Over the course of the semester, we will compare the use of adversarial and collaborative processes in environmental disputes and explore the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches.  We will

Professor(s)

Sean Nolon

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5220.A/Environmental Economics and Markets

The course introduces students to the discipline of environmental economics and exposes them to debates over the use of market-based instruments in environmental, energy, and climate policy. It introduces students to basic economics and finance concepts, examines key principles about market behavior and efficiency, and applies these basic elements and concepts to common environmental problems and actual case studies.

Professor(s)

Kevin B. Jones

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5115.A/Environmental Law

This is a survey course that will introduce students to the basic concepts of U.S. environmental law.  Students will trace the development of this complex and diverse body of law from its common law origins through the development of modern statutory and regulatory programs.  Goals of the course include (1) familiarity with the major federal environmental laws, their underpinnings in the common law, and the competing approaches to public policy reflected in each statute, (2) understanding of the cooperative federal-state governance structure and administrative law framework as applied in U.S.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

GPP7821.A/Estate Planning

Estate Planning: This class is an introduction to estate planning including the law of wills, testamentary and inter vivo trusts, basic probate of wills, basic income and estate tax considerations, powers of attorney, advance care directives and ethical and malpractice issues. Students in this segment will learn to draft a simple will and trust for surviving spouse and children, conduct a client intake interview, and prepare a durable power of attorney, and advance directive for health care.

Professor(s)

Gary Brooks

Semester

2016 Spring

FAM7710.A/Estates

This course examines the statutory and judicial rules governing the gratuitous transfer of property. This includes transfers by gift, intestate succession, wills, trusts, and other non-probate mechanisms.

Professor(s)

Stephanie Willbanks

Semester

2016 Spring

INT7414.A/European Union Law Trento

This one-credit-hour course offers students, who have taken or are enrolled in the basic European Union Law course, an opportunity to study specialized topics in European Union law at the University of Trento Law School in Italy during the week of Spring Break.  The lectures, given by Trento faculty in English, vary in coverage from year to year but include such topics as environmental law, criminal law, fundamental rights, so-called “private law,” and the equal treatment of men and women. 
 

Professor(s)

Peter Teachout

Semester

2016 Spring

LIT7210.A/Evidence

This course is a general survey of the Federal Rules of Evidence, with a special emphasis on the practical application of the rules during the litigation process.  Specific topics will include a detailed consideration of hearsay and its exceptions, relevancy, character evidence, authentication, direct and cross examination, impeachment, expert testimony and privileges.   The course includes a lab component where students will work with specific evidentiary problems in a small-group setting.  Method of evaluation: Final in class exam

Professor(s)

Clara Gimenez

Semester

2016 Spring

MSC7914.A/Exchange Howard Univ. School of Law

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

MSC7916.A/Exchange New York Law School

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

MSC7910.A/Exchange Program

If you are planning to attend an Exchange School, add this course to your registration, and also register for classes here.  You may contact the Registrar's Office for information and we will explain the process.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

MSC7918.A/Exchange Tuck School of Business

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

MSC7913.A/Exchange UC Hastings College of Law

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

MSC7911.A/Exchange UConn School of Law

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

MSC7917.A/Exchange Univ of Puerto Rico

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

MSC7912.A/Exchange: UNH School of Law

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

PUB7500.A/First Amendment Law

This course covers the core issues of free speech, free press, freedom of religion, and the establishment clause. We will discuss important Supreme Court cases dealing with the following topics among others: advocacy of unlawful action; fighting words; hate speech; libel; revelation of private facts; obscenity; pornography; commercial speech; prior restraints; content-based vs.

Professor(s)

Peter Teachout

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9428.A/Food and Agriculture Clinic

Clinic:  In the Food and Agriculture Clinic, students collaborate with local, regional, national and international partner organizations to develop and publicly disseminate law, policy and market tools that provide guidance to food system constituencies, including farmers, food entrepreneurs, consumers, legislators, and advocates, on how to advance law, policy and market initiatives that directly or indirectly promote (1) environmentally and economically sustainable agriculture, (2) public health, (3) food access and food security, (4) local and regional agriculture economies and (5) animal we

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9429.A/Food and Agriculture Seminar

Seminar:  In the Food and Agriculture Clinic seminar, students explore the substantive laws and advocacy skills that underlie their clinic project work. The seminar is a letter grade A-F. 

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

INT7411.A/French Corporate Law

Taught by a VLS graduate who is with a law firm in Paris, France (in English), this course addresses the substantive law and underlying policies of the law of French business corporations and the ways in which the law differs from U.S. corporate law.

Professor(s)

Gretchen Oldham

Semester

2016 Spring

INT7410.A/French Legal Method

Taught by a VLS graduate who is with a law firm in Paris, France (in English), this course provides an introduction to the French law and legal system, and French legal methodology.

Professor(s)

Gretchen Oldham

Semester

2016 Spring

BUS6255.A/Income Taxation

This course is an introduction to federal income taxation. Topics include: the concept of income; exclusions from income; deductions and credits available to individual non-business taxpayers and business taxpayers; sales and other dispositions of property; capital gains and losses; and tax policy. Class discussion focuses on applying the Internal Revenue Code and other legal authority to problems.
Method of evaluation: Class participation, written projects, and final examination.

Professor(s)

Stephanie Willbanks

Semester

2016 Spring

LIT7318.A/Intensive Trial Practice

This course simulates the experience of preparing for trial under the supervision of experienced
trial lawyers. Students will prepare and perform the trial problem issued each November by the
prestigious Texas Young Lawyers’ Association National Trial Competition (TYLA). This
process will involve intensive review of the Federal Rules of Evidence and applicable trial
practice concepts, as well as significant factual analysis, focus, preparation and practice on one
detailed case in order to best replicate the experience of a real trial. Four students are selected

Professor(s)

Larry Novins

Semester

2016 Spring

INT7420.A/International Criminal Law

This course will explore International Criminal Law, broadly defined to include criminal issues that arise in the international setting and international issues that arise in the context of national criminal law.  This broad definition will encompass not only consideration of the prosecution of crimes (war crimes, crimes against humanity, genocide and crimes against peace) in international tribunals, both ad hoc and the permanent International Criminal Court, but also transnational crimes such as terrorism, organized crime, trafficking in drugs and persons, and cybercrimes, which will be prose

Professor(s)

Pamela Stephens

Semester

2016 Spring

ADR6425.A/Interviewing,Counseling and Negotiation

The ethical, professional, and competent practice of law relies upon Interviewing, Counseling, and Negotiation. This simulation based course introduces knowledge and behaviors needed for effective interviewing, counseling, and negotiation. We will cover building working relationships with clients, gathering information from clients and from witnesses through effective questioning and listening, strategic objectives of organizing, developing and assessing decision alternatives and their consequences, negotiation strategies, and ethical issues arising in all these activities.

Professor(s)

Margaret Martin Barry

Semester

2016 Spring

BUS6360.A/Introduction to eLawyering

This introductory course focuses on how new technologies affect the practice of law.  Topics are segmented in to three discrete areas of study:  Virtual Law Practice; Document Assembly and Expert Systems; and eDiscovery and Big Data.  The virtual law practice section offers students a brief glimpse of the promise of virtual practice as well as the practical details and ethical considerations of setting up such a practice.  The section covering document assembly and expert systems demonstrates the efficiency of these systems while offering students an opportunity to work hands-on with the techn

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9431.A/JD Externship - Class

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9425.A/JD Part-Time Externship

The Part-Time JD Externship Program offers a field-based experiential opportunity in which student’s apprentice (without compensation) to lawyers in all areas of practice.  The part-time externship program is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor.

Professor(s)

Jeffry White

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9430.A/Judicial Externship

The Judicial Externship Program offers a field-based experiential opportunity in which student’s apprentice (without compensation) in judicial chambers.  The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial clerk.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision-making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opport

Professor(s)

Jeffry White

Semester

2016 Spring

JUR7390.A/Jurisprudence Tutorial

The Law and Philosophy Tutorial and the jurisprudential issues of tort law are modeled after the Oxford-Cambridge tutorial system in which the student and faculty member would follow a course of reading (jointly agreed to by the faculty member and student).   The two would meet from time to time and the student would set forth what he or she had learned from a particular reading with discussion from the faculty member.

Professor(s)

Richard Brooks

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5239.A/Land Transactions and Finance

Lawyers and land use professionals, whether representing land owners, developers, regulators, development opponents, or land conservation organizations, need to understand the same basics of land transactions, development and finance.  The course examines how land is transferred, including an introduction to the title system, title insurance, purchase contracts and deeds.  The course also provides an introduction to the private development process and exposes students to modern real estate financing and investment decision-making.  Course participants will engage in the negotiation and draftin

Professor(s)

John Echeverria

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9450.A/Land Use Clinic

The Land Use Clinic combines a two-credit classroom component with a four-credit placement experience. The classroom component of the course introduces students to substantive issues that commonly arise in land use practice, to the policies and procedures underlying Vermont’s Environmental Court and the Vermont State Land Use statute, and to the competencies that lawyers need for effective representation in this area of law.

Professor(s)

Catherine Gjessing

Semester

2016 Spring

INT7412.A/Law of the European Union

The course will provide an introduction to European Union Law. It will cover the evolution and structure of the European Union, its institutions and law making process, the hierarchy and interaction of the different sources of law, and the role of the European Court of Justice and the national court systems in interpreting and applying EU law. After a general overview of the structure, principles and provisions of EU law, the course will cover several substantive areas in greater depth.

Professor(s)

Peter Teachout

Semester

2016 Spring

WRI7950.A/Law Review I

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

WRI7951.A/Law Review II

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

GPP7830.A/Legal Activism

This course examines the principles and practices of legal activism and lawyering for social change.  Combining theoretical and practical approaches, the course uses historical and contemporary examples of political lawyering to expose students to a wide variety of mechanisms for effective advocacy including impact litigation, legislative advocacy, community organizing, fund-raising and financing, education, media-strategies, civil disobedience and engagement.  By developing an understanding of strategies for problem-solving and their historical context, students will gain perspective on socia

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5342.A/Legal Adaptation to Global Warming

Adaptation is a necessary and unavoidable complement to mitigation measures required to address the challenge of climate change.  Legal Adaptation to Climate Change addresses how rising sea levels, higher temperatures, changes in precipitation and other physical consequences of climate change will put pressure on established laws and legal institutions that were developed  based on the assumption of a stable climate.    The course will also explore potential new legal and policy tools for maintaining economic, social, political and environmental security in dramatically changing circumstances.

Professor(s)

John Echeverria

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7170.A/Legal Methods

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7265.A/Legal Profession

 This course examines an attorney's obligations under ethical codes and law related to professional conduct.  Students acquire comprehensive knowledge of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct and learn how to apply the Rules to resolve concrete ethical issues they may face in practice.  Study of the Model Rules also supports preparation for the Multi-State Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE).  The course addresses ethical issues in diverse areas of legal practice, with special attention to issues facing environmental lawyers.   Case studies are central.  The class also conducts at

Professor(s)

Reed Elizabeth Loder

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7125.A/Legal Writing II: Theory & Practice

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7125.B/Legal Writing II: Theory & Practice

Professor(s)

Beth McCormack

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7125.C/Legal Writing II: Theory & Practice

Professor(s)

Brian Porto

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7125.D/Legal Writing II: Theory & Practice

Professor(s)

Brian Porto

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7125.E/Legal Writing II: Theory & Practice

Professor(s)

Tony Renzo

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7125.F/Legal Writing II: Theory & Practice

Professor(s)

Tony Renzo

Semester

2016 Spring

PUB7525.A/Legislative Clinic

Admission to the Legislative Clinic is by application.  The course is open to students are enrolled in at the time of application or who have successfully completed the fall Legislation course, a prerequisite for this clinic. 
 

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

ADR6413.A/Mediation Advocacy

Meeting times:  Friday:  February 5th and Saturday, February 6th; Friday, February 19th and Saturday, February 20th. Working with a mediator to help clients resolve cases is an essential skill for the modern lawyer.  Mediation Advocacy will allow students to examine the theory and practice of how to be effective advocates for their clients in the mediation setting.  Students will develop this competency by exploring the various models of mediation.  The course will take students through all aspects of client representation, from counseling regarding ADR methods, selecting cases for mediation,

Professor(s)

Donald (Tad) Powers

Semester

2016 Spring

GPP7815.A/Municipal Law

Representing a client at the municipal level is a challenge like no other in the law. A good attorney must be prepared for everything in forums that occasionally rely more on group sentiment and politics than procedure and rigor. Yet, municipal work is often the most rewarding as the work here as immediate and profound impacts on the community. This course is an introduction to the various issues faced by lawyers representing local government entities. Students will become familiar with the procedures for challenging or defending actions taken by municipalities.

Professor(s)

Daniel Richardson

Semester

2016 Spring

DIV7620.A/Native Americans and the Law

This course will focus on the constitutional, statutory and jurisprudential rules that make up the field of Federal Indian Law.  Attention will be given to the historical framework from which the rules were derived.  After tracing the development of the underlying legal doctrines which are prominent today, we will consider subject-specific areas of Indian Law like hunting and fishing rights, stewardship of natural resources, economic development and protection of religion and cultural lifestyles. 
 

Professor(s)

Hillary Hoffmann

Semester

2016 Spring

ADR6420.A/Negotiation

Meeting Times:  Friday:  February 26th and Saturday:  February 27th and Friday:  March 18th and Saturday:  March 19th. This course is designed to help you explore what it means to be an effective negotiator and to practice the skills needed to improve on this important life skill.  You will be expected to learn and apply theories from a broad range of disciplines including law, economics, psychology, sociology and management.  These theories will be discussed and debated in class discussions and practice through highly interactive simulations.  The course examines the dynamics, constraints, an

Professor(s)

Gregory S. Clayton

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5346.A/New Frontiers in Environmental Policies

This seminar explores the proposition that successfully coping with today’s environmental threats requires deeper challenges to our prevailing system of political economy than mainstream environmentalism in the United States has been willing to mount. It develops the idea that a new American environmentalism is needed and with it new environmental policy and law that go beyond the traditional realm of environmental affairs.

Professor(s)

Melissa Scanlan

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7160.A/Property

Professor(s)

Reed Elizabeth Loder

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7160.B/Property

Professor(s)

John Echeverria

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7180.A/Public Law

Professor(s)

Laurie Beyranevand '03

Semester

2016 Spring

REQ7180.B/Public Law

Professor(s)

Cynthia Lewis

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5349.A/Regulating the Marine Environment

This course examines the interaction of state, federal, and international regimes in the regulation of the marine environment. After a brief historical introduction, the course looks at private rights, the public trust, and the police power in the context of state authority over coastal lands and navigable waters. We then consider the sources of federal power over marine and maritime matters and the relationship of federal preemption of state law and federal incentives for state regulation.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5350.A/Risk Assessment

Learn about risk assessment by living it. In this class, the instructor and students will work together to write a comment letter, petition, white paper and/or FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) request.

Professor(s)

Craig Pease

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5112.A/Science for Environmental Law

This class:
            (1) Broadly surveys the science most relevant to environmental law, including  i) climate science, ii) air pollution including both atmospheric chemistry and health impacts, iii) toxicology of pesticides, food additives and industrial chemicals, iv) forest and endangered species management, and v) human population and resource use.

Professor(s)

Craig Pease

Semester

2016 Spring

BUS6285.A/Secured Transactions

This course is an examination of the structure of the law of security interests in personal property from both practical and economic perspectives.  It examines the interests of all parties in secured transactions, particularly as a way of financing business. The focus of the course is on statutory analysis and problem-solving.
 
Method of evaluation:  Final exam

Professor(s)

Joan Vogel

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9411.A/Semester In Practice (SIP)

The Semester in Practice Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice.  The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9412.A/Semester In Practice Class

The Semester in Practice Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice.  The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9315.A/South Royalton Legal Clinic Class

Classroom component:
Spring 2016-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks:  8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Spring sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks.

Professor(s)

James C. May

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9315.B/South Royalton Legal Clinic Class

Classroom component:
Spring 2016-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks:  8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Spring sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9310.A/South Royalton Legal Clinic FT

Students work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel.  Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners.  Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship.  Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and inv

Professor(s)

James C. May

Semester

2016 Spring

CLI9312.A/South Royalton Legal Clinic PT

Students work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel.  Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners.  Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship.  Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and inv

Professor(s)

James C. May

Semester

2016 Spring

LIT7220.A/Trial Practice

This course covers the important aspects of a trial, including jury selection, opening statements, direct and cross examination, exhibits, objections, expert witnesses, and closing arguments. Each week students are assigned problems which present specific advocacy issues and which require role playing and examination of witnesses. The course culminates in a full, simulated trial. This is a “learn by doing” course and requires active class participation. 
Prerequisite: Evidence; may NOT be taken concurrently.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

LIT7220.B/Trial Practice

This course covers the important aspects of a trial, including jury selection, opening statements, direct and cross examination, exhibits, objections, expert witnesses, and closing arguments. Each week students are assigned problems which present specific advocacy issues and which require role playing and examination of witnesses. The course culminates in a full, simulated trial. This is a “learn by doing” course and requires active class participation. 
Prerequisite: Evidence; may NOT be taken concurrently.

Professor(s)

Kevin Griffin

Semester

2016 Spring

WRI7960.A/Vermont Journal of Environmental Law I

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

WRI7961.A/Vermont Journal of Environmental Law II

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

MSC7915.A/Visiting

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

ENV5246.A/Water Quality

This course takes an in depth look at the Clean Water Act and related statutes such as the Safe Drinking Water Act, The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (“Ocean Dumping Act”) and the Coastal Zone Management Act. Common law remedies are also considered. Guest speakers will provide additional perspectives.
 
Method of Evaluation:  One commentary (1000 words) and take-home final take home. 
AWR (No)

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring

MSC7920.A/Yale MEM Program

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Spring