2016 Fall Semester Residential Classes

CLI9329/Advanced ENRLC 9

Advanced ENRLC provides students an opportunity to take the Clinic for a second semester and build on their previous ENRLC experiences.  Students will further develop their understanding of relevant substantive law and the lawyering skills introduced in the initial Clinic course.  They will be expected to take greater responsibility for counseling clients, developing cases, and reaching resolutions consistent with client goals.  They will also be expected to help novice clinicians approach the work of the Clinic.  In pursuing these advanced competencies, students will develop their leadership

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CRI7305/Advanced Criminal Law Seminar

This seminar undertakes an intensive and comprehensive examination of the constitutional, legal, procedural, and public policy issues surrounding a topic in criminal law.  The specific topic varies from year to year and is detailed in the class description below.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9437/Advanced Energy Clinic

The Advanced Energy Clinic explores at an advanced level, the practical aspects of real world energy projects from the stage of conceptualization, development, contracting, financing, regulatory approval and construction.  Students will be further exposed to the state and federal statutes, rules, tax codes, and ordinances that apply to the development of energy projects particularly those that promote sustainability at the community level.  Students will also review and/or develop purchased power and other commercial agreements governing these projects.  Current project areas include community

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9326/Advanced ENRLC 6

Advanced ENRLC provides students an opportunity to take the Clinic for a second semester and build on their previous ENRLC experiences.  Students will further develop their understanding of relevant substantive law and the lawyering skills introduced in the initial Clinic course.  They will be expected to take greater responsibility for counseling clients, developing cases, and reaching resolutions consistent with client goals.  They will also be expected to help novice clinicians approach the work of the Clinic.  In pursuing these advanced competencies, students will develop their leadership

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV7380/Advanced Environmental Legal Research

This one-credit course provides in-depth exposure to the most effective strategies and resources for environmental law research, including specialized information databases, environmental news/updating, administrative law research, legislative history, international environmental legal research, environmental dispute resolution sources, and non-legal environmental research. The course is designed to prepare law students to research well while in law school as well as in practice.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9336/Advanced South Royalton Legal Clinic

Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9339/Advanced South Royalton Legal Clinic

Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9333.A/Advanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 13

Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5381/Agriculture and Food Entrepreneur Lawyering Skill

Agriculture and Food Entrepreneurial Law teaches the nuts and bolts of providing legal services to farmers and food entrepreneurs (producers/retailers/restaurants), drawing from the rich examples of farmer and food entrepreneurs locally. Such skills are needed to equip students with real world legal knowledge for those students seeking to provide legal services in this area or who wish to start an entrepreneurial career in food and agriculture.

Professor(s)

Beth Boepple

Semester

2016 Fall

ADR6410.A/Alternative Dispute Resolution

This class presents the theory and practice of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration that constitute the foundation of alternative dispute resolution (ADR).  This survey course focuses on the theory and practice of these techniques that are used as alternatives or as additions to formal litigation.  Students will examine the different theories, approaches and the wide range of issues (e.g.

Professor(s)

Joan Vogel

Semester

2016 Fall

JUR7333/Animal Law and Ethics

This course surveys American law affecting animals and examines its ethical foundations with an eye toward preparing students to advance legal reforms underway.  The legal contexts of animal law include criminal law, torts, property, and estates.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

REQ7255/Appellate Advocacy A - E

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CRI7313/Capital Punishment

This seminar examines capital punishment as a legal process, using interdisciplinary materials and theory, litigation documents including briefs and recordings of oral arguments, and appellate opinions.  The seminar also employs written narratives, movies, and popular cultural images and artifacts to explore this subject matter.  Diverse topics in the course may include: analyzing legal arguments for and against the death penalty (whether capital punishment does or does not violate the constitution); the court's ongoing attempts to articulate meaningful standards for deciding who deserves to d

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5209/CERCLA Law and Policy

This course provides an overview of the federal and state laws and policies that govern the disposal of hazardous waste, with a focus on the provisions of the Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation and Liability Act known as CERCLA.  The course will also touch on related topics including brownfields redevelopment and other federal and state hazardous waste laws.  Students will become familiar with CERCLA through reading case law and examining relevant statutes and regulations.  The course will also include writing assignments and role-play assignments in the classroom.  CERCLA Law

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

REQ7104 A, B/Civil Procedure I

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5212/Climate Change and Law

Climate change is the most profound social and environmental issue of the 21st century. This course will integrate the emerging science and law of climate change along with economic and inter-generational equity aspects of the problem. We will consider how existing federal laws such as the Clean Air Act may be used to address climate change as well as how new more comprehensive laws may be fashioned. Different policy instruments will be considered including carbon taxes and emissions trading. State and regional approaches will be considered along with questions of federalism and preemption.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5365/Climate Change: The Power of Taxes

Reducing greenhouse gas emissions requires long-term changes in behavior, and in a capitalist society, industry, businesses, and consumers respond to prices. Increase in the cost of greenhouse gases can reduce emissions, and reductions in the price of alternatives to fossil fuels can increase their use.

Professor(s)

Janet Milne

Semester

2016 Fall

XAD7810/Commercial Transactions

This course will cover contracts between parties of all sorts involving the transfer of goods and services, with particular emphasis on the interpretation and understanding of Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code. In the context of a law firm's actual practice, and through a series of exercises both in and out of class, you will analyze specific fact situations arising out of commercial transactions, and advise clients on issues of liability, performance and breach.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5122/Communication, Advocacy and Leadership

In this course, we will consider and practice the various tools commonly accessed in effective advocacy. As advocates, we try to generate support for particular ideas or policies either to raise awareness or effectuate action.  To accomplish this, the successful advocate considers how to define an audience and reach it by developing a persuasive message which is then delivered through an appropriate channel.  Over the course of the following semester, you will practice writing persuasively using a number of different channels.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5304/Comparative Environmental Law Research

This seminar is a research and writing seminar that will provide a framework and faculty supervision for students to engage in comparative environmental law research. The seminar will provide opportunities for students to work on U.S.-China environmental law research projects that will provide technical assistance to partners who engage in environmental advocacy and  environmental law reform in China.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

REQ7130/Contracts A and B

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

BUS6235/Corporations

This course will prepare you to understand and provide advice on the principal organizational forms used to structure businesses in the United States.  These forms include corporations, limited liability companies, limited partnerships, general partnerships and sole proprietorships.  We will also examine the law of agency.  Course coverage includes an introduction to securities regulation through the lens of insider trading.
Method of evaluation:  Final exam

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

REQ7140/Criminal Law

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CRI7350/Criminal Law Clinic

This course gives students the opportunity to experience criminal practice in either prosecution or defense settings under the close supervision of our distinguished practitioner-faculty members.  Students will be placed in the prosecution, defense or appellate defense practice settings, and will receive classroom instruction once per week for two hours covering foundational aspects of Vermont criminal.  Students will then apply classroom concepts in real criminal cases, working under close supervision of the classroom faculty, Anna Saxman (Vermont Deputy Defender General) David Cahill (Deputy

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CRI7307/Criminal Practice and Procedure

The course will focus on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and the 4th, 5th, 6th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Students will examine the constitutional principles of criminal procedure and how those principles are actually utilized in practice. This course will give students the basic understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional criminal law and procedure while at the same time learning the practical application of theory to practice.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

XAD7817/Criminal Procedure: Bail to Jail

Criminal Procedure: Bail to Jail is a 2 credit course designed to simulate practice using criminal cases.  Students will be expected to complete two writing assignments and two in-class oral exercises.  The focus of the class is substantive and practical criminal law and procedure.  The class will also incorporate related issues, such as professional responsibility and ethics, client and witness contact and control, and issues collateral to criminal cases.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

MSC7905/Dean's Fellows Seminar

In this seminar, Dean's Fellows meet with the Director of the Legal Writing Program to discuss teaching strategies for the course. The Director begins each seminar by describing the lesson plan and expectations for the upcoming class.  He then opens the floor for discussion.  The seminar is a collaborative environment where Dean's Fellows share ideas to improve the experience for everyone. 

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

BUS6361.A/eLaw: Discovery Data

This course will prepare you for the modern practice of law, and teach the skills necessary to request, produce and manage documents in this age of electronically stored information.  95% of cases never go to trial; they are litigated to conclusion through pre-trial strategy and discovery.  Discovery today is largely (estimates around 85%) based on discovering ESI.  Students who have taken this course will have skills that offer added value to hiring firms.  eDiscovery is now a multi-billion dollar industry, which can be a source of good jobs for graduates educated in the area.  The concepts a

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

BUS6362.A/eLaw: Practice Management

Law firms require general business knowledge, legal practice specific business knowledge and knowledge of the technologies that enable support those functions.  Today solo practices to large law firms are using practice management and litigation software to assist with the day to day operation of firms.  Courts have in the direction of paperless filing and calendaring, indeed many courts only allow e-filing.  Modernized courts have many opportunities for counsel to use technology to make a stronger case or as needed to present electronic evidence.  This course will provide students with the th

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9427.A/Energy Clinic

Through this course students will be introduced to the practical aspects of real world energy projects.  Students will become involved in some aspect of the development or evaluation of sustainable energy projects and may have the opportunity to support the legal and policy requirements of a particular project or through the development of model legal documents to facilitate future projects.  Current project areas include community solar development and other alternative energy systems.  Students will be introduced to the state and federal statutes, rules, tax codes, and ordinances that apply

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5226/Energy Law and Policy

The energy industry is both a key to the life that billions seek and America's most significant source of pollution. Environmental problems are the energy industry's most important constraint.This course examines key issues in American energy policy, and searches for ways to resolve or ease the strains which that policy puts upon environmental sustainability.We will review fundamental vocabulary and facts about our energy demands, evaluate sample regulatory orders and statutes and consider legal writings that address many of those elements from the perspective of legal review.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9302.A/Environmental & Natural Resource Law Clinic

The Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic functions as a public interest environmental law firm with a collegial atmosphere that encourages interaction and feedback among students and Clinic faculty. Under the supervision of experienced environmental attorneys, student clinicians represent community groups and conservation organizations in real-world cases and projects.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5115/Environmental Law

This course is an introduction to the law pertaining to environmental issues such as population, economic growth, energy, and pollution. Environmental problems are defined and alternative approaches for dealing with them are examined.  Existing statutory efforts such as the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act are analyzed.
 
Method of evaluation:  Final exam 

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

FAM7710/Estates

 This foundation course examines gratuitous transfers of property. Included are practical studies of the drafting, execution, revocation, and construction of wills; will substitutes; inheritance; the administration of decedents’ estates; trusts and fiduciary relationships; inter vivos gifts; powers of appointment; future interests; and end-of-life planning. Special emphasis is placed on the relationship between lawyer and client in this context.
 
Method of evaluation:  Final exam.  AWR (No)

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

LIT7210/Evidence

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

LIT7210.A/Evidence

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

LIT7211 A,B, C/Evidence Lab

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5335/Extinction and Climate Change

 Human activities are causing a global extinction of plants and animals that rivals the five great extinction events over the earth's geologic history. Habitat loss, overharvest, invasive species and pollution have been the principal causes of this "Sixth Extinction." Climate change exacerbates all of these problems and poses even graver threats to global biodiversity. Ocean acidification –global warming's evil twin –threatens major damage to marine ecosystems.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

FAM7715/Family Law

This course will examine the roles of law and of private ordering in family law contexts. Topics which may be included are marriage and divorce, child custody and support, alimony, property division, tax consequences of divorce, and family violence. The course will also look at various means of dispute resolution in the domestic relations area, including negotiation, mediation, and litigation.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

FAM7717/Family Law Practice

Family Law Practice is a one-credit simulation-based module designed to provide students with opportunities for transactional learning in addition to those already contained in the three-credit Family Law course.  It includes a professional development component that focuses on the family law practitioner.  All students who are currently enrolled in Family Law, or who have previously taken and completed Family Law, are welcome.  This one-credit module is recommended especially for those students who have an interest in practicing family law.  Please note the dates of class meetings and be sure

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

PUB7500/First Amendment

 This course covers the core issues of free speech, free press, freedom of religion, and the establishment clause. We will discuss important Supreme Court cases dealing with the following topics among others: advocacy of unlawful action; fighting words; hate speech; libel; revelation of private facts; obscenity; pornography; commercial speech; prior restraints; content-based vs.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9428.A/Food & Agriculture Clinic

In the Food and Agriculture Clinic, students collaborate with local, regional, national and international partner organizations to develop and publicly disseminate law, policy and market tools that provide guidance to food system constituencies, including farmers, food entrepreneurs, consumers, legislators, and advocates, on how to advance law, policy and market initiatives that directly or indirectly promote (1) environmentally and economically sustainable agriculture, (2) public health, (3) food access and food security, (4) local and regional agriculture economies and (5) animal welfare.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9429/Food & Agriculture Seminar

In the Food and Agriculture Clinic seminar, students explore the substantive laws and advocacy skills that underlie their clinic project work. Method of evaluation: The seminar is a letter grade A-F.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CRI7331/Impaired Driving

Combining substantive law with actual criminal case documents, simulations, and hands-on practice in class, the Impaired Driving Course for 2L and 3L students will cover all aspects of DUI cases from arrest through prosecution and sentencing. This 3-credit course will meet one day per week and will be graded on a High Pass, Pass, Low Pass, Fail basis. There are no prerequisites, although students might benefit from taking an upper level criminal law class before this course. The semester will culminate with a mock hearing or trial.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5218/International Climate Law

Class work will focus on the language and structure of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC), its Kyoto Protocol, and now the new Paris Agreement.  We will also learn about the COP/CMP governance process and procedure; specific substantive issues like REDD+ and land use overall, adaptation and the Loss and Damage Mechanism (LDM), CDM and other flexibility mechanisms, finance, and technology transfer; individual parties' and party groups' negotiating positions; and the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and side events in the process.Delegation members will attend on

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

INT7421/International Environmental Law and Policy

This course provides an introduction to the structure and basic principles of international environmental law (IEL) and to IEL's place in international and domestic legal systems. The course evaluates the effectiveness of different IEL regimes, the role of international and non-governmental organizations in shaping IEL; the interrelationship between international legal process and domestic law; and the negotiation, conclusion, and implementation of international environmental agreements.

Professor(s)

Jessica Scott

Semester

2016 Fall

INT7424/International Human Rights

This seminar provides an introduction to international human rights law and procedures, and provides students with initial training in how to use the advocacy tools available in this field to make a difference in the community and the world. The course examines what are "human rights" and explores the law of treaty interpretation; how human rights law is incorporated into domestic legal systems; and the role of international governmental organizations, international and regional courts, and non-governmental organizations (NGOs) in protecting human rights.

Professor(s)

Stephanie Farrior

Semester

2016 Fall

XAD7814/International Intellectual Property

The acquisition, transfer, valuation, and enforcement of intellectual property rights play an increasingly important role domestically and internationally.  During this course, students will develop a fundamental understanding of patent, trademark, and copyright law and policy, and how these policies govern the design and implementation of national laws and the influence of culture on country practices involving protection of intellectual property.  This course will also introduce students to the legal issues involved in the representation of clients involved in the innovative and creative ind

Professor(s)

Justin McCabe

Semester

2016 Fall

INT7425/International Law

This course provides an introduction to international law and the international legal system. Using real-world examples, it examines the processes through which international law is made, interpreted and applied, exploring the role of states as well as that of international bodies, non-governmental organizations, and corporations and other non-state actors. The application of international law in domestic legal systems is examined, as is the reach of domestic law in the international arena.Method of evaluation:  Short quizzes and final exam.

Professor(s)

Stephanie Farrior

Semester

2016 Fall

INT7428/International Regulation of Trade

This course provides students with an introduction to the rapidly developing field of international trade regulation.  Our primary focus will be on the World Trade Organization and the interpretation and enforcement of the various international trade treaties - GATT, GATS, TRIPS, and TRIMS - that fall under the WTO’s jurisdiction.  Although these treaties vary in coverage and approach, they reflect a common aim - elimination of barriers to trade - and incorporate certain basic shared principles (such as the “equal treatment” principle underlying the National Treatment and Most Favorable Nation

Professor(s)

Peter Teachout

Semester

2016 Fall

ADR6424.A/Interviewing & Counseling

This is a simulation based course in which we explore and practice important tasks lawyers must perform skillfully when interviewing and counseling clients. We will:
•      Share and learn theories regarding core behaviors needed to prepare, conduct, and evaluate legal interviews and counseling conferences effectively;
•      Create opportunities to practice fundamental interviewing and counseling behaviors to develop new skills and improve existing competencies; and

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

INT7437/Introduction to Chinese Law

This course provides an introduction of contemporary Chinese law and legal institutions from a historical and comparative perspective. The course begins with a brief examination of the traditional Chinese legal system and an evaluation of China's legal reform before the establishment of the People's Republic of China and in the post-Mao era. The course will then give an overview of China's political system, sources of law and law makings, and the key areas of Chinese law, including criminal law, constitutional and administrative law, civil law and environmental law.

Professor(s)

Yanmei Lin

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5108/Introduction to the Law and Policy of Agriculture, Food and Environment

This survey course brings together American law impacting agriculture and food and explores the traditional divisions between agriculture, food, and environmental regulation.  The course provides a hard look at the agriculture and food production sector and involves not only an examination of traditional farming and food safety policies but the ways in which these policies intersect with environmental law and health care policy, as well as important sectors from local land use planning to international trade.

Professor(s)

Laurie Ristino

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9425.A/JD PT Externship

The Part-Time JD Externship Program is a field-based externship in which student’s apprentice (without pay) to lawyers and JD professionals in all areas of practice.  The part-time externship program is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional working with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The Part-Time Externship provides students an opportunity to participate in a range of lawyering tasks so that they develop an improved understanding

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9430/Judicial Externship

The Judicial Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) in judicial chambers.  The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial law clerk.  The Judicial Externship will provide students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develop wri

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

JUR7320/Judicial Opinion Writing

This seminar explores the judicial opinion writing process as distinguished from adversarial legal writing.  Class readings, discussions, and written assignments will encourage students to critically examine decision and opinion writing of prominent jurists.  Class assignments will encourage students to develop the understanding and skills needed to assist judges by drafting opinions, bench memos, and judicial research memoranda based on the briefs and records in previously litigated state and federal cases.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9431/Judicial Seminar

The Judicial Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) in judicial chambers.  The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial law clerk.  The Judicial Externship will provide students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develop wri

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

LLM9606.A/L.L.M. Seminar

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5125/Land Use Regulation

 This course reviews and evaluates the traditional American legal controls available to regulate the use of land, including local zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations, as well as more innovative techniques such as growth tempo controls, growth boundaries and transferable development rights. It examines the relevant statutory basis for these
techniques and the constitutional limitations on their use, evaluates their effectiveness in controlling “sprawl,” and explores the relative roles of state and local government in land use regulation.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

REQ7120 1-7/Legal Analysis Writing I

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

REQ7122/Legal Research 1-6

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

REQ7120 A and B/Legal Writing I

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

PUB7510/Legislation

This course will focus on the composition and organization of legislatures and the Congress, legislative procedure, and the interpretation of statutes – the legislative product.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

REQ7185/Legislation and Regulation

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

PUB7550/National Security Law

War against the Islamic State in Iraq and Syria, targeted killing of terrorist suspects, security implications of climate change, cyber warfare, and NSA spying on Americans' email and phone calls --- these are only a few of the current issues addressed in this course.  Lawyers are at the very center of each one.  They (and you) will be concerned with international and domestic authorities for the use of military force, intelligence gathering at home and abroad, the detention and interrogation of terrorist suspects, homeland security, espionage, and the protection of sensitive government inform

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ADR6420.A/Negotiation

 THIS IS AN INTENSIVE COURSE TO BE OFFERED OVER THE COURSE OF 4 DAYS.  The designated days are: Friday, September 30, 2:10-6:30
Saturday, October 1, 8:00am -6:30pmFriday, October 14, 2:10-6:30

Professor(s)

Donald (Tad) Powers

Semester

2016 Fall

REQ7265.A/Professional Responsibility

 Problem based study of lawyer's professional obligations and issues of professional formation. Includes ABA Model Rules, ethical rules from selected jurisdictions - especially the jurisdictions where students may practice - and other laws and traditions governing lawyer's conduct. We focus in class on developing the knowledge and skills necessary to identify ethical dilemmas and the tools to help resolve them. Evaluation is based on student participation (individual, small group and on-line), CALI lessons, one written mid-term, and one written final assessment due at the end of exam period.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

REQ7265.B/Professional Responsibility

 This course examines an attorney's obligations under ethical codes and law related to professional conduct.  Students should acquire comprehensive knowledge of the Model Rules of Professional Conduct, and learn how to apply the Rules to resolve concrete ethical issues they may face in practice and on the Multi-State Professional Responsibility Examination (MPRE).  Diverse areas of legal practice are covered with some special attention to issues facing environmental lawyers.   Case studies and problems are the primary vehicles for learning.  At least one simulation will be included.  General e

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

REQ7180/Public Law (Masters)

This course will provide students an introduction to the legislative process, regulatory agencies, and agency law-making. Students will learn to navigate modern U.S. government institutions and processes, with a particular emphasis on the legislative process and the administrative state. Key topics include the structure and animating principles of the U.S.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

DIV7610/Race and the Law Seminar

The purpose of the course is to introduce students to race as it relates to and is reflected in the law. The focus will primarily be on the role and experience of African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Latin-Americans, and Native-Americans in American society, with attention to questions concerning critical race theory, class, family, and feminism. The course will also examine the way law relates to racial diversity in the United States.Method of evaluation:  Final paper and AWR yes.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5349/Regulating the Marine Environment

This course examines the interaction of state, federal, and international regimes in the regulation of the marine environment. After a brief historical introduction, the course looks at private rights, the public trust, and the police power in the context of state authority over coastal lands and navigable waters. We then consider the sources of federal power over marine and maritime matters and the relationship of federal preemption of state law and federal incentives for state regulation.

Professor(s)

Kinvin Wroth

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5112/Science for Environmental Law

This class: (1) Broadly surveys the science most relevant to environmental law, including i) climate science, ii) air pollution including both atmospheric chemistry and health impacts, iii) toxicology of pesticides, food additives and industrial chemicals, iv) forest and endangered species management, and v) human population and resource use. (2) Discusses how scientific thinking and culture differs from legal thinking and culture.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9411.A/SiP

The Semester in Practice (SiP) Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) to lawyers in all areas of practice.  The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional or professionals with a JD (where appropriate) who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The SiP provides an opportunity – through observation, participation, practice, and reflection – to improve students’ legal knowledge and skills a

Professor(s)

Jeffry White

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9412.A/SiP Class

The Semester in Practice (SiP) Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) to lawyers in all areas of practice.  The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced lawyers or other legal professionals with a JD (where appropriate) who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The SiP provides an opportunity – through observation, participation, practice, and reflection – to improve students’ legal knowledge and skills

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9315 A and B/South Royalton Legal Clinic Class

Classroom component:
Fall 2016-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks:  8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held as scheduled Monday – Friday for the first 5 weeks.  There are 5 consecutive class days to start; after that 11 (eleven) class days are spread throughout the following 4 weeks.
Registration:  You must apply to enroll in SRLC through the VLS Clinical Communication application system.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9310/South Royalton Legal Clinic Full Time

Students work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel.  Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners.  Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship.  Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and inv

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CLI9312/South Royalton Legal Clinic Part Time

Students work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel.  Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners.  Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship.  Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and inv

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

REQ7150 A & B/Torts

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

LIT7220.A/Trial Practice

This course covers the important aspects of a trial, including jury selection, opening statements, direct and cross examination, exhibits, objections, expert witnesses, and closing arguments. Each week students are assigned problems which present specific advocacy issues and which require role playing and examination of witnesses. The course culminates in a full, simulated trial. This is a “learn by doing” course and requires active class participation.Prerequisite: Evidence; may NOT be taken concurrently.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

ENV5245/Water Resources Law

Water is the planet's most precious natural resource. Deciding how it will be shared among competing demands is one of a society's most challenging questions. Water Resources Law is a review of the law and policies concerned with the allocation of water resources in the United States. This course will examine the three main systems of water law in the United States: Eastern riparian systems, the prior appropriation doctrine of the West, and the nationally diverse laws regulating the use of groundwater.

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall

CRI7318/White Collar Crime

White Collar Crime balances black letter law with current, high-profile examples of corporate felonies and fiascos. Topics include: conspiracy, mail fraud, wire fraud, securities fraud, perjury, obstruction of justice, RICO, tax fraud, money laundering, and environmental crimes. In addition, we’ll cover administrative investigations, grand jury investigations, pleas, trials and sentencing.
 
Method of evaluation:  Take home exam or paper (AWR yes for paper)

Professor(s)

Semester

2016 Fall