​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Students, please note:  CampusWeb is the authoritative source for class information, so please refer to CampusWeb when making final registration ​​decisions.​​



 

 

ADR6410.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1821ADR6410.AAlternative Dispute ResolutionVogel, Joan<div>This class presents the theory and practice of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration that constitute the foundation of alternative dispute resolution (ADR).  This survey course focuses on the theory and practice of these techniques that are used as alternatives or as additions to formal litigation.  Students will examine the different theories, approaches and the wide range of issues (e.g. legal, economic, sociological, moral, ethical, psychological, political to name a few) that arise in the selection and application of these dispute resolution techniques.  In addition to classroom discussion, students will participate in simulation exercises in order to engage the different techniques as a neutral, an advocate and a disputant. <br>Students cannot take this course and Environmental Dispute Resolution or ADR & the Environment.  <br>Method of evaluation:  Class participation and papers. </div>3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1821
ADR6420.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1822ADR6420.ANegotiationPowers,DonaldTHIS IS AN INTENSIVE COURSE TO BE OFFERED OVER THE COURSE OF 4 DAYS. This course is designed to help you explore what it means to be an effective negotiator and to practice the skills needed to improve on this important life skill. You will be expected to learn and apply theories from a broad range of disciplines including law, economics, psychology, sociology and management. These theories will be discussed and debated in class discussions and practice through highly interactive simulations. The course examines the dynamics, constraints, and skills needed to be an effective negotiator. It focuses equally on the use of negotiation in deal making and to resolve disputes. We will conduct simulations in a variety of contexts including face-to-face, over the phone and email. We will explore how dynamics change when moving from two-party to multi-party negotiations and look at how ethics should influence our behavior. Readings will need to be completed ahead of time and a final project will be completed after classes. Method of Evaluation: Performance in simulations, participation in Class and a final negotiation (Does not satisfy AWR) MELP: Distributional requirement - Alternative Dispute Resolution.2.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bPowers,Tad1822
ADR6424.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1823ADR6424.AInterviewing and CounselingCole,Liz Ryan This is a simulation based course in which we explore and practice important tasks lawyers must perform skillfully when interviewing and counseling clients. We will: • Share and learn theories regarding core behaviors needed to prepare, conduct, and evaluate legal interviews and counseling conferences effectively; • Create opportunities to practice fundamental interviewing and counseling behaviors to develop new skills and improve existing competencies; and • Increase awareness of ethical and other core values that comprise effective interviewing and counseling. Evaluation is ongoing over the course of the semester and will be based on role plays, journals and other reflection, and class participation.3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1823
BUS6235http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1824BUS6235CorporationsGoodenough,OliverThis course will prepare you to understand and provide advice on the principal organizational forms used to structure businesses in the United States. These forms include corporations, limited liability companies, limited partnerships, general partnerships and sole proprietorships. We will also examine the law of agency. Course coverage includes an introduction to securities regulation through the lens of insider trading. Method of evaluation: Final exam4.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1824
BUS6361.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1904BUS6361.AeLaw: Discovery DataEicks,Jeannette 95% of cases never go to trial; they are litigated to conclusion through pre-trial strategy and discovery. Discovery today is largely (estimates around 85%) based on discovering ESI. This course will prepare you for the modern practice of law, and teach the skills necessary to request, produce and manage documents in this age of electronically stored information. Beginning with the intersection of big data and the law and moving into data as ESI, this course will cover the forms and formats of modern production. Students who have taken this course will have skills that offer added value to hiring firms. eDiscovery is now a multi-billion dollar industry, which can be a source of good jobs for graduates educated in the area. The concepts and skills taught in this course have little overlap with other courses. The following objectives will be addressed in this course – all of which offer opportunities to analyze the impacts of technology on law: * Understand ESI representation of clients in transactional law and litigation. * Explore the jurisprudential impacts of technology on how we conceive of and apply law. * Demonstrate an understanding of the application of legal ethics in the area of ESI. * Explain the technical and practical problems presented to clients and counsel as they prepare for and respond to eDiscovery requests. * Describe the features of an eDiscovery plan and the considerations involved in creating one. * Explain the importance and the steps that maybe taken to maintain computer and network security and avoid spoliation. * Explain methods by which parties learn about the opposing party’s technical infrastructure and ESI. * Discuss difficulties which spring from the inability of counsel and client to reach agreement regarding ESI * Demonstrated knowledge of the FRCP and the Rules of Evidence as they relate to ESI. Method of evaluation: Three projects and a hands-on component. AWR – Yes3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1904
BUS6362.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1826BUS6362.AeLaw: Practice ManagementEicks,JeannetteLaw firms require general business knowledge, legal practice specific business knowledge and knowledge of the technologies that enable support those functions. Today solo practices to large law firms are using practice management and litigation software to assist with the day to day operation of firms. Courts have in the direction of paperless filing and calendaring, indeed many courts only allow e-filing. Modernized courts have many opportunities for counsel to use technology to make a stronger case or as needed to present electronic evidence. This course will provide students with the theoretical and practical background to understand the fundamentals of operating a law practice as well as the rapid evolution of legal practice. Areas of special focus include business planning and account management; case and client management; mobile information and devices; document management; eMediation and online dispute resolution; workflow management; eCourt systems and presentation technologies. Readings and guest speakers will address both general technological issues as well as specific legal ramifications. Students will use matter management software to organize and manage a mock case, prepare e-filings and use technology to strengthen a closing argument and present that argument in a courtroom setting. Method of evaluation: 25% Short exercises 75% Three Projects - 1) writing a law firm business plan; 2) organization and arrangement of a mock case utilizing matter management software; and 3) the development of a technology driven closing argument incorporating digital evidence using Federal court software.2.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1826
CLI9302.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1905CLI9302.AEnvironmental Natural Resource Law ClinicCredit Hours: 6, 9, or 13 The Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic functions as a public interest environmental law firm with a collegial atmosphere that encourages interaction and feedback among students and Clinic faculty. Under the supervision of experienced environmental attorneys, student clinicians represent community groups and conservation organizations in real-world cases and projects. Although the Clinic experience varies from student to student depending on the cases and projects assigned, the range of typical experiences includes: communicating with clients, experts, agency personnel, and opposing parties; conducting site visits; investigating scientific, technical, and other factual information; gathering public records using FOIA and state public record laws; engaging in specialized legal research; drafting and filing court briefs and pleadings in compliance with local court rules; conducting written and oral discovery; analyzing complex legal and factual materials; developing legal theories, claims, and arguments; engaging in strategic decision-making; negotiating with opposing parties and crafting settlement agreements; complying with ethical and professional standards; and, sometimes, appearing in court. The goal of the clinical experience is to develop well-rounded professionals with a high degree of skill and judgment grounded in service to clients and respect for the environment and the rule of law. Classroom Component and Clinic Hours: Required classes two days/week—one hour fifteen minutes each class. Generally each week, one class is Case Review and one class is Seminar. Students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the required two/days a week ENRLC classes. A student’s schedule for the student’s other Clinic hours will be determined by the individual student in consultation with clinical faculty at the beginning of the semester. Legal Profession is strongly recommended, but not required, for students enrolling in any Clinic term. In addition, during the selection process, priority may be given to students who have successfully completed Environmental Law (or another substantive environmental law course). Registration: The ENRLC follows the common application process for clinics. Notices are sent to the student body near the beginning of each semester about the common application process; this information is also available on the ENRLC’s website. Recruitment for the Fall semester occurs in the spring. Recruitment for the Spring semester occurs in the fall. Recruitment for the Summer term occurs in the fall and, if there are remaining slots, again in the spring. The Clinic conducts interviews with interested applicants. If a student is selected for the ENRLC by clinical faculty, the ENRLC will provide the Registrar’s Office with a list of all accepted applicants and the Registrar will register them for the course. Because of the full-time nature of the 13-credit option, students taking the ENRLC for 13 credits may not register for another course without the express consent of the Director of the Clinic. Summer term: the Summer term is full-time for all students regardless of credit status, and students may select 0, 6, or 9 credits.6.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1905
CLI9310http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1827CLI9310South Royalton Legal Clinic Full TimeMay,JamesStudents work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel. Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners. Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship. Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and investigate cases, draft pleadings and memoranda, participate in negotiations, and conduct evidentiary and appellate hearings, all under the supervision of one of the Clinic's attorneys. It is recommended that students take Evidence and/or Trial Practice prior to enrolling in the Clinic, but neither is required. Satisfies Experiential requirement.​10.0000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1827
CLI9312http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1829CLI9312South Royalton Legal Clinic Part TimeMay,JamesStudents work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel. Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners. Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship. Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and investigate cases, draft pleadings and memoranda, participate in negotiations, and conduct evidentiary and appellate hearings, all under the supervision of one of the Clinic’s attorneys. It is recommended that students take Evidence and/or Trial Practice prior to enrolling in the Clinic, but neither is required. Registration: You must apply to enroll in SRLC through the VLS Clinical Communication application system.3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1829
CLI9315.A and .Bhttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1830CLI9315.A and .BSouth Royalton Legal Clinic ClassMay,JamesClassroom component: Fall 2017-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks: 8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held as scheduled Monday – Friday for the first 5 weeks. There are 5 consecutive class days to start; after that 11 (eleven) class days are spread throughout the following 4 weeks. Registration: You must apply to enroll in SRLC through the VLS Clinical Communication application system. Assessment of students’ performance in the classroom portion and representation of clients will be made by the Clinic faculty on a pass/fail basis (“pass honors” and “low pass” are other possible designations). NOTE: Part-time and full-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the Clinic’s introductory session; they should also realize that occasional conflicts may arise between court hearings (and similar commitments) and daytime classes, in which case client obligations prevail. Satisfies Experiential requirement. Spring 2018 -- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks: 9:55 -- 11:10 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held as scheduled Monday – Friday for the first 5 weeks. There are 5 consecutive class days to start; after that 11 (eleven) class days are spread throughout the following 4 weeks. Registration: You must apply to enroll in SRLC through the VLS Clinical Communication application system. Assessment of students’ performance in the classroom portion and representation of clients will be made by the Clinic faculty on a pass/fail basis (“pass honors” and “low pass” are other possible designations). NOTE: Part-time and full-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the Clinic’s introductory session; they should also realize that occasional conflicts may arise between court hearings (and similar commitments) and daytime classes, in which case client obligations prevail. Satisfies Experiential requirement.3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1830
CLI9326.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1984CLI9326.AAdvanced ENRLC 6Advanced ENRLC provides students an opportunity to take the Clinic for a second semester and build on their previous ENRLC experiences. Students will further develop their understanding of relevant substantive law and the lawyering skills introduced in the initial Clinic course. They will be expected to take greater responsibility for counseling clients, developing cases, and reaching resolutions consistent with client goals. They will also be expected to help novice clinicians approach the work of the Clinic. In pursuing these advanced competencies, students will develop their leadership and decision-making skills and gain greater insight into the challenges and rewards of professional practice. Classroom Component and Clinic Hours: Required classes two days/week—one hour fifteen minutes each class. Generally each week, one class is Case Review and one class is Seminar. Though Advanced ENRLC students will not be required to participate in every Seminar, they are required to participate in every Case Review. Students who enroll in Advanced ENRLC may not enroll in courses that conflict with the two/days a week ENRLC classes. A student’s schedule for the student’s other Clinic hours will be determined by the individual student in consultation with clinical faculty at the beginning of the semester. Prerequisite: ENRLC. Registration: Only by permission of the ENRLC Director. A student interested in Advanced ENRLC should speak with clinical faculty about doing the Clinic for a second semester. Selection is dependent upon space, case needs, and the student’s previous record in the Clinic. If the student is selected for Advanced ENRLC, the ENRLC will provide the Registrar’s Office with the student’s name, and the Registrar will register the student6.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1984
CLI9329http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1985CLI9329Advanced ENRLC 9Advanced ENRLC provides students an opportunity to take the Clinic for a second semester and build on their previous ENRLC experiences. Students will further develop their understanding of relevant substantive law and the lawyering skills introduced in the initial Clinic course. They will be expected to take greater responsibility for counseling clients, developing cases, and reaching resolutions consistent with client goals. They will also be expected to help novice clinicians approach the work of the Clinic. In pursuing these advanced competencies, students will develop their leadership and decision-making skills and gain greater insight into the challenges and rewards of professional practice. Classroom Component and Clinic Hours: Required classes two days/week—one hour fifteen minutes each class. Generally each week, one class is Case Review and one class is Seminar. Though Advanced ENRLC students will not be required to participate in every Seminar, they are required to participate in every Case Review. Students who enroll in Advanced ENRLC may not enroll in courses that conflict with the two/days a week ENRLC classes. A student’s schedule for the student’s other Clinic hours will be determined by the individual student in consultation with clinical faculty at the beginning of the semester. Prerequisite: ENRLC. Registration: Only by permission of the ENRLC Director. A student interested in Advanced ENRLC should speak with clinical faculty about doing the Clinic for a second semester. Selection is dependent upon space, case needs, and the student’s previous record in the Clinic. If the student is selected for Advanced ENRLC, the ENRLC will provide the Registrar’s Office with the student’s name, and the Registrar will register the student.9.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1985
CLI9333.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1831CLI9333.AAdvanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 13May, JamesStudents will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director. Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.13.0000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1831
CLI9336.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1832CLI9336.AAdvanced South Royalton Legal ClinicMay, James Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director. Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked6.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1832
CLI9339http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1833CLI9339Advanced South Royalton Legal ClinicMay, James Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director. Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.9.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1833
CLI9411.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1834CLI9411.ASemester in PracticeWhite,Jeffry The Semester in Practice (SiP) Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) to lawyers in all areas of practice. The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional or professionals with a JD (where appropriate) who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms. The SiP provides an opportunity – through observation, participation, practice, and reflection – to improve students’ legal knowledge and skills and to inform and expand their vision of what the practice and profession of law can be. Components and Requirements of the SiP Course: There are two different components to the SiP program: a practicum component and a classroom component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site attorney supervisor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. All students are required to participate in an on-line orientation prior to the first day of work on-site, as well as an on-campus session held in the semester preceding the externship. Credits and Grading: Students enrolled in the full time program work for 15 weeks, full-time according to the schedule of their assigned office, and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits. Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded. Eligibility: 1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. 2. Timely submission of a JD Externship Program Application (a list of required materials is included in the application materials). Application Deadlines: 1. In order to participate in a Fall SiP, students must complete a JD Externship Program Application by February 1st. 2. In order to participate in a Spring SiP, students must complete a JD Externship Program Aplication by September 30th. Satisfies the experiential credit requirement.11.0000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1834
CLI9411.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1986CLI9411.ASemester in PracticeWhite,JeffryThe Semester in Practice (SiP) Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) to lawyers in all areas of practice. The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional or professionals with a JD (where appropriate) who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms. The SiP provides an opportunity – through observation, participation, practice, and reflection – to improve students’ legal knowledge and skills and to inform and expand their vision of what the practice and profession of law can be. Components and Requirements of the SiP Course: There are two different components to the SiP program: a practicum component and a classroom component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site attorney supervisor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. All students are required to participate in an on-line orientation prior to the first day of work on-site, as well as an on-campus session held in the semester preceding the externship. Credits and Grading: Students enrolled in the full time program work for 15 weeks, full-time according to the schedule of their assigned office, and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits. Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded. Eligibility: 1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. 2. Timely submission of a JD Externship Program Application (a list of required materials is included in the application materials). Application Deadlines: 1. In order to participate in a Fall SiP, students must complete a JD Externship Program Application by February 1st. 2. In order to participate in a Spring SiP, students must complete a JD Externship Program Aplication by September 30th. Satisfies the experiential credit requirement.11.0000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1986
CLI9425.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1835CLI9425.AJD Externship Part TimeWhite,Jeffry The Part-Time JD Externship Program is a field-based externship in which student’s apprentice (without pay) to lawyers and JD professionals in all areas of practice. The part-time externship program is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced legal professional working with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms. The Part-Time Externship provides students an opportunity to participate in a range of lawyering tasks so that they develop an improved understanding of the legal process and of legal problems at all stages of resolution. Components and Requirements of the Part-Time JD Externship Course: There are two different components to the Part-Time JD Externship program: a practicum component and an academic component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site attorney supervisor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. A mandatory seminar component is included with pass/fail evaluation and there is no additional credit for the seminar. The Externship Faculty has the option on a semester by semester basis of doing either individual conference sessions or regular classroom sessions. All students are required to participate in an orientation during the first week of the externship semester. Credits and Grading: Students enrolled in the part-time program must work three hours per week, on average, for 15 weeks for each credit earned. For example, a six credit externship requires 2.4 days or 18 hours of work per week. Students may earn from four to six credits depending on the time committed. Students take classes on-campus during the semester in addition to participating in a JD externship. Eligibility: 1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. 2. Timely submission of a JD Externship Program Application (a list of required materials is included in the application materials). Application Deadlines: 1. In order to participate in a Fall Part-Time JD Externship, students must complete a JD Externship Program Application by April 1st. 2. In order to participate in a Spring Part-Time JD Externship, students must complete a JD Externship Program Applicaion by September 30th. Exernships for 4 or 5 credits count toward satisfaction of the experiential credit requirement. Externships for 6 credits satisfy the experiential credit requirement.4.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1835
CLI9427.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1836CLI9427.AEnergy ClinicJones,KevinThrough this course students will be introduced to the practical aspects of real world energy projects. Students will become involved in some aspect of the development or evaluation of sustainable energy projects and may have the opportunity to support the legal and policy requirements of a particular project or through the development of model legal documents to facilitate future projects. Current project areas include community solar development and other alternative energy systems. Students will be introduced to the state and federal statutes, rules, tax codes, and ordinances that apply to the development of energy projects particularly those that promote sustainability at the community level. Specific projects undertaken by the energy clinic will be selected in order to support some social justice or environmental benefit including community ownership, greenhouse gas reduction, or low income energy affordability goals. Classroom instruction will be through IEE faculty, fellows, and guest lecturers. This course is offered in the summer, fall, and spring semesters. Energy Policy in a Carbon Constrained World (ENV5226) is co-requisites for this course. Application through the common clinic application process and/or instructor approval is required. 4.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bOliver,Jeannie1836
CLI9428.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1837CLI9428.AFood and Agriculture ClinicRenner,JamieIn the Food and Agriculture Clinic, students collaborate with local, regional, national and international partner organizations to develop and publicly disseminate law, policy and market tools that provide guidance to food system constituencies, including farmers, food entrepreneurs, consumers, legislators, and advocates, on how to advance law, policy and market initiatives that directly or indirectly promote (1) environmentally and economically sustainable agriculture, (2) public health, (3) food access and food security, (4) local and regional agriculture economies and (5) animal welfare. Student clinicians participate in all aspects of project development and execution, gaining experience in both advocacy and the business behind it. Skills practiced in the clinic — including problem solving, cross-professional collaboration, legal research, legal writing, project management, legal resource design, interviewing, public speaking, media and marketing — are transferable to any advocacy context. Method of evaluation: Clinic is high pass/low pass/fail. 4.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMoses,Aurora1837
CLI9429http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1838CLI9429Food and Agriculture ClinicMoses,AuroraIn the Food and Agriculture Clinic seminar, students explore the substantive laws and advocacy skills that underlie their clinic project work. Method of evaluation: The seminar is a letter grade A-F.2.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1838
CLI9430.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1839CLI9430.AJudicial ExternshipWhite,JeffryThe Judicial Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) in judicial chambers. The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial law clerk. The Judicial Externship will provide students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system. The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develop writing, research and analytical skills. Components and Requirements of the Judicial Externship: There are two different components to the Judicial Externship: a practicum component and a classroom component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site judicial supervisor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. All students are required to participate in a one-day orientation prior to the first day of work on-site. Credits and Grading: Students enrolled in the judicial externship program work for 15 weeks, full-time according to the court's schedule, and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits. Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded. Eligibility: 1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. 2. Timely submission of a JD Externship Program Application (a list of required materials is included in the application materials). Application Deadlines: 1. In order to participate in a Fall Judicial Externship, students must complete a JD Externship Program Application by February 1st. 2. In order to participate in a Spring Judicial Externship, students must complete a JD Externship Program Application by September 30th. Satisfies the experiential credit requirement.11.0000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1839
CLI9431.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1840CLI9431.AJudicial Externship SeminarWhite,JeffryThe Judicial Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) in judicial chambers. The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial law clerk. The Judicial Externship will provide students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system. The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develop writing, research and analytical skills. Components and Requirements of the Judicial Externship: There are two different components to the Judicial Externship: a practicum component and a classroom component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site judicial supervisor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. All students are required to participate in a one-day orientation prior to the first day of work on-site. Credits and Grading: Students enrolled in the judicial externship program work for 15 weeks, full-time according to the court's schedule, and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits. Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded. Eligibility: 1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. 2. Timely submission of a JD Externship Program Application (a list of required materials is included in the applicaton materials). Application Deadlines: 1. In order to participate in a Fall Judicial Externship, students must complete a JD Externship Program Application by February 1st. 2. In order to participate in a Spring Judicial Externship, students must complete a JD Externship Program Application by September 30th. Satisfies the experiential credit requirement.2.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1840
CLI9437.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1841CLI9437.AAdvanced Energy ClinicJones/OliverThe Advanced Energy Clinic explores at an advanced level, the practical aspects of real world energy projects from the stage of conceptualization, development, contracting, financing, regulatory approval and construction. Students will be further exposed to the state and federal statutes, rules, tax codes, and ordinances that apply to the development of energy projects particularly those that promote sustainability at the community level. Students will also review and/or develop purchased power and other commercial agreements governing these projects. Current project areas include community solar development and other alternative energy systems. Advanced Energy Clinic students will play a leadership role in managing project teams and interfacing with clients. Classroom instruction will be through IEE faculty, fellows, and guest lecturers. This course is offered in the summer, fall and spring semesters. The Energy Clinic and Energy Policy in a Carbon Constrained World (ENV5226) are prerequisites for this course. Application through the common clinic application and/or instructor approval is required. 4.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1841
CRI7305http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1842CRI7305Advanced Criminal Law SeminarSand, RobertAlternative Criminal Justice Programs This seminar will focus on Alternative Criminal Justice Programs and Responses. Using a national template known as the Sequential Intercept Model, students will be introduced to evidence-based approaches and programs at every stage of the criminal justice system that provide effective alternatives to the traditional model from arrest through release from incarceration. Students will not only gain an in depth knowledge of regional, national, and international alternative criminal justice approaches, but they will also meet with and learn from leading alternative justice practitioners. This course is graded and meets the Perspective Course requirement. Students will submit a final project on a topic related to an alternative criminal justice program or response. This project may take the form of a traditional AWR or other substantial piece of writing, but it may also take a non-traditional form such as a PowerPoint or Prezi presentation, proposed legislative initiative, annotated op-ed or magazine piece, or pod cast or other type of audio presentation. Vermont based proposals may be presented to the General Assembly in the spring. Although there are no prerequisites for this course, students will derive more benefit from the class if they have taken Criminal Practice or Criminal Procedure: Bail to Jail. 2 Credits 20 Student Limit 2.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1842
CRI7307http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1844CRI7307Criminal Practice and ProcedureSaxman,AnnaThe course will focus on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and the 4th, 5th, 6th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Students will examine the constitutional principles of criminal procedure and how those principles are actually utilized in practice. This course will give students the basic understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional criminal law and procedure while at the same time learning the practical application of theory to practice. The course curriculum will focus attention on: bail, search and seizure, the right against self-incrimination and involuntary confessions, discovery, Double Jeopardy, Confrontation Clause, the right to effective assistance of counsel, judgment of acquittal motions, jury instructions and sentencing. Students will have the opportunity to draft and argue motions in criminal pre-trial and trial litigation. This course is a blend of the practical and theoretical, and students can expect to leave this class knowing how to analyze factual scenarios using constitutional criminal law cases and the Rules. Students will be expected to argue motions in front of the class as well as serve as judges ruling on the motions made in class. Students will have the opportunity to improve their legal analysis, writing and oral argument skills.4.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1844
CRI7313http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1845CRI7313Capital PunishmentMeyer,PhilipThis seminar examines capital punishment as a legal process, using interdisciplinary materials and theory, litigation documents including briefs and recordings of oral arguments, and appellate opinions. The seminar also employs written narratives, movies, and popular cultural images and artifacts to explore this subject matter. Diverse topics in the course may include: analyzing legal arguments for and against the death penalty (whether capital punishment does or does not violate the constitution); the court's ongoing attempts to articulate meaningful standards for deciding who deserves to die; the sociology of death row confinement; the methods of capital punishment (electrocution, lethal injection, etc.); the impact of capital punishment upon various actors (guards, judges, families of the executed, etc.); moral arguments for and against the death penalty; issues of age, race and gender and the death penalty; terrorism and the death penalty; theories of punishment and the death penalty; and the history of capital punishment in America. Satisfies perspective requirement. *Method of evaluation is based upon class participation and submission of a final paper. *The paper may satisfy the AWR requirement, with permission of the instructor. (The AWR paper is a longer research project and has different requirements.) 2.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1845
CRI7318http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1846CRI7318White Collar CrimeTaub,Jennifer White Collar Crime balances black letter law with current, high-profile examples of corporate felonies and fiascos. Topics include: conspiracy, mail fraud, wire fraud, securities fraud, perjury, obstruction of justice, RICO, tax fraud, money laundering, and environmental crimes. In addition, we’ll cover administrative investigations, grand jury investigations, pleas, trials and sentencing. Method of evaluation: Take home exam or paper (AWR yes for paper)3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1846
CRI7331.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1847CRI7331.AImpaired DrivingCahill,David<p>Combining substantive law with actual criminal case documents, simulations, and hands-on practice in class, the Impaired Driving Course for 2L and 3L students will cover all aspects of DUI cases from arrest through prosecution and sentencing. This 3-credit course will meet one day per week and will be graded on a High Pass, Pass, Low Pass, Fail basis. There are no prerequisites, although students might benefit from taking an upper level criminal law class before this course. The semester will culminate with a mock hearing or trial.</p>3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1847
CRI7350http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1848CRI7350Criminal Law ClinicSaxman,AnnaThis course gives students the opportunity to experience criminal practice in either prosecution or defense settings under the close supervision of our distinguished practitioner-faculty members. Students will be placed in the prosecution, defense or appellate defense practice settings, and will receive classroom instruction once per week for two hours covering foundational aspects of Vermont criminal. Students will then apply classroom concepts in real criminal cases, working under close supervision of the classroom faculty, Anna Saxman (Vermont Deputy Defender General) David Cahill (Deputy State’s Attorney, WRJ) and Brian Marsicovetere (Marsicovetere Law Group, PC) contracted to provide public defender services in Windsor County). This is a 6 credit course: 2 credit hours of classroom – once a week for 2 hours; and 4 credit hours of clinic work – twice a week, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, for a total of 13 hours. The course will be graded High Pass/Pass/Low Pass/Fail. Enrollment is limited to 6 students. This course satisfies the skills requirement. Placements will be distributed as follows: Windsor County State’s Attorney’s Office (2 students) Students will co-prosecute DUI and other misdemeanor cases. Motions will be filed in court to admit students under the student practice rule. Practical experience will include taking depositions, responding to, drafting, and arguing motions, examining and cross examining witnesses and participating in jury selection and trial. Vermont Office of Defender General/ Appellate Defense (2 students) Students will be assigned 1 to 2 cases per semester. They will read the record, analyze the facts and the law, research, draft, and ultimately write the appellate brief in the case. The students may return to argue their cases before the Vermont Supreme Court the following semester under the student practice rules. Marsicovetere Law Group, PC/ Public Defender (2 students) Students in the clinic will be assigned specific misdemeanor cases and will be closely supervised throughout the process of each case, arraignment through disposition. Students will experience the discovery process, research and draft applicable motions to suppress, dismiss, or compel further discovery, and, depending on the complexity of the motion, take part in the hearing accompanied by a supervising attorney. If applicable, they will work on settlement negotiations with the state. If the case proceeds on a trial track, then they will work with the supervising attorney in all aspects of trial preparation.6.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1848
CRI7903http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1902CRI7903Race and the Criminal Justice SystemBarry,MargaretRequirements: Can meet AWR This course will explore the connection between racial subordination and mass incarceration in the United States. The course is designed to develop some of the undercurrents of the introductory Criminal Law course, encouraging students to make connections between our emphasis on criminal law enforcement and the social costs. It will do so by reading the required text, Michelle Alexander, The New Jim Crow (2010) and related readings and film. The final grade will be based on the following: Class attendance and participation: 25% This is a seminar the goal of which is to explore the law and literature that discusses race and criminal justice in our country. The exploration requires and depends on student participation. That participation is expected to be respectful and sincere. You are expected to attend all classes. To be excused, you must communicate with the professor and the reason must be compelling. Paper: 65% To complete this course, you must submit a 20 page, double-spaced research paper. The paper must develop an issue directly related to the subject matter of the course, must reflect serious research, and must be the appropriate form for a scholarly legal research paper. The subject of the paper, a one-page description and your research plan must be submitted in writing after the 5th class. You must schedule a meeting with the professor to discuss the paper within two weeks of submitting description and research plan. The paper is due two weeks before the end of class. Oral Presentation: 10% Each student is expected to do a 10-minute presentation of their paper. The last two classes will be devoted to these presentations. Student Learning Outcome Competencies: Legal Analysis and Reasoning o Use legal and non-legal principles and other relevant information to advocate for or against a position or policy Legal Research o Use strategies and technologies to retrieve and evaluate cases, statutes, secondary sources and other materials effectively and efficiently Written and Oral Communication o Express ideas clearly orally and in writing  Organize and present legal analysis in writing  Attribute appropriately and effectively, including proper use of citation  Explain concepts clearly orally in formal and informal presentations Recognize the following ethical obligations: o The responsibility to enhance the capacity of the law and legal institutions to do justice, including access to legal representation o The obligation to rid the profession of prejudice based on race, religion, national or ethnic origin, gender, sexual orientation, disability, age, or socio-economic status3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1902
DIV7610http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1849DIV7610Race and the Law SeminarJefferson,ShirleyThe purpose of the course is to introduce students to race as it relates to and is reflected in the law. The focus will primarily be on the role and experience of African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Latin-Americans, and Native-Americans in American society, with attention to questions concerning critical race theory, class, family, and feminism. The course will also examine the way law relates to racial diversity in the United States. Method of evaluation: Final paper and AWR yes.2.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1849
DIV7620.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1906DIV7620.ANative AmericansHoffmann,HillaryThis course will focus on the constitutional, statutory and jurisprudential rules that make up the field of Federal Indian Law. Attention will be given to the historical framework from which the rules were derived. After tracing the development of the underlying legal doctrines which are prominent today, we will consider subject-specific areas of Indian Law like hunting and fishing rights, stewardship of natural resources, economic development (including tribal gaming and natural resource development) and protection of religion and cultural lifestyles. Method of evaluation: A final presentation and a final paper, or a final exam. Perspectives course. AWR - Yes 3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1906
ENV5108http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1850ENV5108Introduction to the Law and Policy of Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentRistino,LaurieThis survey course brings together American law impacting agriculture and food and explores the traditional divisions between agriculture, food, and environmental regulation. The course provides a hard look at the agriculture and food production sector and involves not only an examination of traditional farming and food safety policies but the ways in which these policies intersect with environmental law and health care policy, as well as important sectors from local land use planning to international trade. The emergence of local food movements also invites an exploration of new business models that provide for entrepreneurial activity in the food and food production space.3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1850
ENV5112.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1851ENV5112.AScience for Environmental LawPease,CraigThis class: (1) Broadly surveys the science most relevant to environmental law, including i) climate science, ii) air pollution including both atmospheric chemistry and health impacts, iii) toxicology of pesticides, food additives and industrial chemicals, iv) forest and endangered species management, and v) human population and resource use. (2) Discusses how scientific thinking and culture differs from legal thinking and culture. Thus, the course goes beyond summarizing what science currently knows, also asking why science knows what it does, how scientists gather data and draw inferences, and how scientists themselves evaluate the reliability of scientific information. (3) Explores some of the key challenges in effectively using science in legal and policy decision making. The course will develop several different perspectives on this, including i) looking in detail at the science underlying particular legal cases, ii) looking at the challenges inherent in translating science into regulatory standards, and iii) examining the roles of major scientific institutions in supplying advice and analysis to policymakers. Broadly, the student will develop an understanding of the interface of science, law and policy, through the study of several specific case studies. Method of evaluation: Mid-term exam and paper (2000 words) AWR: Yes3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1851
ENV5115.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1852ENV5115.AEnvironmental LawFirestone,David This course is an introduction to the law pertaining to environmental issues such as population, economic growth, energy, and pollution. Environmental problems are defined and alternative approaches for dealing with them are examined. Existing statutory efforts such as the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act are analyzed. Method of evaluation: Final exam3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1852
ENV5122http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1853ENV5122Communication, Advocacy and LeadershipFaulkIn this course, we will consider and practice the various tools commonly accessed in effective advocacy. As advocates, we try to generate support for particular ideas or policies either to raise awareness or effectuate action. To accomplish this, the successful advocate considers how to define an audience and reach it by developing a persuasive message which is then delivered through an appropriate channel. Over the course of the following semester, you will practice writing persuasively using a number of different channels. After completion of the upcoming courses, you will have: (1) drafted legislation and created a legislative lobbying sheet pertaining thereto; (2) written a federal Freedom of Information Act (“F.O.I.A.”) request; (3) submitted written comments to a federal agency on an issue open for comment; (4) created a non-profit, identified a funder, and drafted a grant letter of inquiry to receive funding; and (5) worked with a colleague to develop a small scale public communications campaign on an issue of your choosing.3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1853
ENV5125.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1854ENV5125.ALand Use RegulationMilne,JanetThis course reviews and evaluates the traditional American legal controls available to regulate the use of land, including local zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations, as well as more innovative techniques such as growth tempo controls, growth boundaries and transferable development rights. It examines the relevant statutory basis for these techniques and the constitutional limitations on their use, evaluates their effectiveness in controlling “sprawl,” and explores the relative roles of state and local government in land use regulation. Method of evaluation: Final exam AWR: No3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1854
ENV5209.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1907ENV5209.ACERCLA Law and Policy3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1907
ENV5212http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1855ENV5212Climate Change and LawParenteau,PatClimate change is the most profound social and environmental issue of the 21st century. This course will integrate the emerging science and law of climate change along with economic and inter-generational equity aspects of the problem. We will consider how existing federal laws such as the Clean Air Act may be used to address climate change as well as how new more comprehensive laws may be fashioned. Different policy instruments will be considered including carbon taxes and emissions trading. State and regional approaches will be considered along with questions of federalism and preemption. Both supply-side and demand-side energy options will be evaluated, along with the transportation and land use sectors. Measures to reduce tropical deforestation and wetland loss will be included. The status of international negotiations under the UNFCCC will be reviewed. Climate litigation will be covered. Guest speakers will provide a variety of perspectives. Method of Evaluation: Three commentaries (500 words each) Final Paper (5000 words) AWR: Yes (3)3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1855
ENV5218http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1856ENV5218International Climate LawBach,TracyStudents at Vermont Law School have the opportunity to learn about international climate change law and policy through both theory and first-hand observation. Selected students do applied learning in international environmental law by representing VLS as a non-governmental observer delegation at the annual Conference of Parties (COP) of the United Nations Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC). The delegation is led by Professor Tracy Bach. Student delegates are enrolled in VLS’s juris doctor and masters programs, including the MELP, MERL, and LLM degrees, and come from both our residential and distance learning programs. This three-credit course is organized around two components: a weekly class for the full semester and one week of onsite experiential learning at COP23, which will be held in Bonn, Germany from November 6 – 17, 2017. Classwork covers a range of topics, from the underlying theory and practice of public international law focused on environmental problem solving to specific topics covered by the UNFCCC, Kyoto Protocol, and Paris Agreement, including mitigation and adaptation strategies, loss and damage, land use and agriculture, capacity building, and climate finance. While onsite at the COP, VLS delegation members attend official sessions and side events, follow negotiation issues, and blog about their observations and analyses. VLS students also engage in service learning by supporting a least developed country (LDC) delegation in the COP negotiations through pre-COP briefing memos, COP session note taking, and daily briefings. In these ways, students in this hybrid classroom/experiential course come away from it with an understanding of international environmental lawmaking informed by direct experience. Students should be aware that this course is writing intensive. It includes two briefing memos submitted before the COP; blogging before and during the COP; note taking at the COP; and a short reflective memo upon return from the COP. In addition, students are evaluated on their contributions to the classroom discussions, active engagement at the COP, and overall teamwork. The method of evaluation is based on these writing projects and activity at the COP, not an exam. The AWR option is not offered for this course. During the on-site component in Germany, students will represent VLS as members of its Observer Delegation accredited by the United Nations. As such, they will be expected to comport themselves in an appropriate manner, attend all assigned COP sessions and side events, and contribute to the delegation's social media presence. Students agree that by registering for the course and being selected for the delegation, they will attend COP23 in November, 2017. Please note: Attendance at COP23 will require students to miss one week of classes in mid-November. Students will work with Professor Bach to minimize the impact that their COP23 absence has on their other classes. Also please bear in mind that students arrange and pay for their own travel expenses to and from Germany, scheduling their travel to arrive the day before their COP23 week begins and to depart after their COP23 week has finished. We will strive to keep our costs down by sharing a living space and meals; students can estimate approximately $2000 for airfare, shared lodging, and shared meals (breakfast and dinner). Finally, this course has a limited enrollment of 10 students. It is because the UNFCCC Secretariat restricts our observer delegation to 5 student members per week or 10 students total. The selection process for this course begins when you register. All students who register are automatically waitlisted. Students on the list are contacted by Professor Bach, who makes the selection decision based on: 1. relevant course work, such as International Law, International Environmental Law, and Climate Change and the Law (whether taught on campus or via distance learning); 2. an application form that includes your VLS transcript and 1 VLS reference; 3. a timed writing sample, and 4. an interview with Professor Bach. If you should have any questions about the course, please contact Professor Bach directly at tbach@vermontlaw.edu. 3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1856
ENV5226.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1857ENV5226.AEnergy Law and PolicyDworkin,MichaelThe energy industry is both a key to the life that billions seek and America's most significant source of pollution. Environmental problems are the energy industry's most important constraint. This course examines key issues in American energy policy, and searches for ways to resolve or ease the strains which that policy puts upon environmental sustainability. We will review fundamental vocabulary and facts about our energy demands, evaluate sample regulatory orders and statutes and consider legal writings that address many of those elements from the perspective of legal review. Readings will include ethical issues of social justice in siting projects, meeting – or limiting – energy demand, the statutory schemes underlying traditional regulation, and a brief introduction to the wholesale electric markets that are considered in more detail in the follow-up spring semester. Method of evaluation: Mid-term essay; take home final exam and class participation.3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1857
ENV5229http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1858ENV5229Environmental Issues in BusinessLatham,Mark2.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1858
ENV5235http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1859ENV5235Natural Resources LawHoffmann,HillaryOne third of the nation’s land base belongs to the American public and much of it is managed by the United States Forest Service and agencies of the Department of the Interior. Beginning with the creation of Yellowstone, the world’s first national park, in 1872, and the protection of federal forest reserves in the 1890s, the United States practically invented the concept of public lands and in the process have left an enduring gift to the nation and the world. These federal lands traditionally provided timber, minerals and forage for a growing nation. In the last 50 years, Americans have to come to appreciate their public lands for wildlife habitat, sources of clean water, wilderness, energy development and a myriad of outdoor recreation opportunities. While America's public lands are vast, they are not limitless. Resource conflicts have dominated land management decisions for the last 40 years. Those conflicts are reflected in the courts, Congress and local communities, where interest groups of all stripes vie for their share of public lands resources. Students will explore not only pertinent statutes and regulations, but the social and economic debates that are equally critical to understand federal public lands and resources, including climate change. Method of evaluation: Final exam. AWR (No)3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1859
ENV5245http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1860ENV5245Water Resources LawEcheverria,JohnWater is the planet's most precious natural resource. Deciding how it will be shared among competing demands is one of a society's most challenging questions. Water Resources Law is a review of the law and policies concerned with the allocation of water resources in the United States. This course will examine the three main systems of water law in the United States: Eastern riparian systems, the prior appropriation doctrine of the West, and the nationally diverse laws regulating the use of groundwater. The course will also review federal water allocation issues, interstate water disputes, tribal water rights matters, and will highlight contemporary water allocation dilemmas throughout the country. Method of evaluation: Final exam3.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1860
ENV5304.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1861ENV5304.AComparative Environmental Law ResearchLin,Yanmei) This seminar is a research and writing seminar that will provide a framework and faculty supervision for students to engage in comparative environmental law research. The seminar will provide opportunities for students to work on U.S.-China environmental law research projects that will provide technical assistance to partners who engage in environmental advocacy and environmental law reform in China. The seminar will enable VLS students to work with their Chinese student counterparts and travel to China to present their research (on the condition that their research papers have been accepted for presentation in a conference or seminar held in China). For this year, students enrolled in this seminar will work on topics or case studies related to the environmental public interest laws. The seminar will provide introduction and background on comparative law and methodology, introduction to Chinese environmental law and governance, and substantive and procedure laws related to environmental public interest litigation, and research methods and resources. Students will learn basic comparative law methodology and research skills related to understand a foreign legal system and generate a series of research reports or a publishable paper at the end of the course. This course will focus on helping students design/refine their research project proposals and critiquing their research and draft papers. This course is a two-semester sequence (fall 2-credits, spring 1-credit), though the fall semester may be taken independently. Students are required to write a paper of 30-35 page equivalents (for 3 credits) or a paper of 20-25 page equivalent (for 2 credits) as their final exam. Method of evaluation: class performance (10%) and the final paper (90%). GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1861
ENV5310.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1862ENV5310.AEnvironmental Health Law SeminarFaulk2.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1862
ENV5335.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1863ENV5335.AExtinction and Climate ChangeParenteau,PatHuman activities are causing a global extinction of plants and animals that rivals the five great extinction events over the earth's geologic history. Habitat loss, overharvest, invasive species and pollution have been the principal causes of this "Sixth Extinction." Climate change exacerbates all of these problems and poses even graver threats to global biodiversity. Ocean acidification –global warming's evil twin –threatens major damage to marine ecosystems. The course looks at how domestic laws like the Endangered Species Act of 1973 and international laws such as CITES, the Convention on Biodiversity, and the forestry provisions of the UNFCCC (REDD+) seek to respond to these threats. Guest speakers will help round out the understanding of the richness and complexity of the issues. Method of evaluation: Three commentaries (500 words each) Final Paper (5000 words)2.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1863
ENV5349http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1864ENV5349Regulating the Marine EnvironmentBeyranevand,LaurieThis course examines the laws and policies regulating natural resources management and environmental protection of the marine environment. The course considers conflicts between public and private uses of the coastal zone, as well as state and federal laws. The course also briefly addresses the interplay between domestic law and policy and applicable principles and rules of international law. The course will cover coastal management, the public trust, fisheries law and the law of the sea, the protection of marine mammals, ocean renewable energy development, and marine reserves. Method of Evaluation: Take-home examination.2.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1864
ENV5365.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1865ENV5365.AClimate Change: The Power of TaxesMilne,JanetReducing greenhouse gas emissions requires long-term changes in behavior, and in a capitalist society, industry, businesses, and consumers respond to prices. Increases in the cost of greenhouse gases can reduce emissions, and reductions in the price of alternatives to fossil fuels can increase their use. This seminar explores the ways in which tax systems in the United States and elsewhere can send these negative and positive price signals. Addressing issues of theory, policy, politics, and law, the seminar will cover topics such as: carbon taxes and other energy taxes; the relative merits of carbon taxes and a cap-and-trade approach; federal tax incentives for renewable energy, alternative fuel vehicles, and energy conservation; the role of land conservation tax incentives in reducing greenhouse gas emissions; the repeal of tax subsidies for fossil fuels; and the interaction of tax measures and command-and-control regulation. While focusing on climate change, the seminar will provide students with the framework for understanding how and when to use tax measures to address other environmental problems as well. Limited enrollment2.00000000000000GP0|#1b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e;L0|#01b4fec16-ccc8-47b4-a454-f2d093c4c58e|2017 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1865