ADR6413.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1410ADR6413.AMediation AdvocacyPowers,Donald<div>Meeting times:  Friday:  February 5th and Saturday, February 6th; Friday, February 19th and Saturday, February 20th.</div><div> </div><div>Working with a mediator to help clients resolve cases is an essential skill for the modern lawyer.  Mediation Advocacy will allow students to examine the theory and practice of how to be effective advocates for their clients in the mediation setting.  Students will develop this competency by exploring the various models of mediation.  The course will take students through all aspects of client representation, from counseling regarding ADR methods, selecting cases for mediation, selecting a mediator, writing mediation briefs and agreements, pivotal legal issues, and effective advocacy in the mediation session.  This course will rely heavily on role-plays to practice many of the skills needed to effectively represent a party in mediation.</div><div> </div><div>Classroom time will consist of lectures, discussion, role-play and critique.  <br></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bS 8 - 6:30pm, F 2:10 - 6:30pm1410
ADR6415.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1386ADR6415.AEnvironmental Dispute ResolutionNolon,Sean<div>Resolving environmental disputes is notoriously difficult.  These conflicts involve multiple parties, complicated factual matters and typically resist simple solutions.  In this course, students will explore these characteristics, investigate the full range of processes available to manage environmental disputes and assesses relevant policy and practical considerations of process selection.  Over the course of the semester, we will compare the use of adversarial and collaborative processes in environmental disputes and explore the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches.  We will rely heavily on simulations to explore theories and build the skills needed to be effective environmental negotiators.  Through this course you will develop an understanding of how to create an effective problem-solving climate that will meet your client’s needs.</div><div> </div><div>Method of evaluation is class participation, quizzes and a final exam<br>AWR-No<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bT 3:35 - 5:15pm1386
ADR6420.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1411ADR6420.ANegotiationClayton,Gregory<div>Meeting Times:  Friday:  February 26th and Saturday:  February 27th and Friday:  March 18th and Saturday:  March 19th.</div><div> </div><div>This course is designed to help you explore what it means to be an effective negotiator and to practice the skills needed to improve on this important life skill.  You will be expected to learn and apply theories from a broad range of disciplines including law, economics, psychology, sociology and management.  These theories will be discussed and debated in class discussions and practice through highly interactive simulations.  The course examines the dynamics, constraints, and skills needed to be an effective negotiator.  It focuses equally on the use of negotiation in deal making and to resolve disputes.  We will conduct simulations in a variety of contexts including face-to-face, over the phone and email.  We will explore how dynamics change when moving from two-party to multi-party negotiations and look at how ethics should influence our behavior.  Readings will need to be completed ahead of time and a final project will be completed after classes.  This is a limited enrollment course (24)<br>Satisfies skills requirement.<br>MELP:  Distributional requirement  - Alternative Dispute Resolution.</div><div> </div><div>Method of Evaluation: Performance in simulations, participation in Class and a final negotiation (Does not satisfy AWR)<br></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bS 8:30 - 6:30pm, F 2:30 - 6:30pm1411
ADR6425.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1387ADR6425.AInterviewing,Counseling and NegotiationBarry,Margaret<div>The ethical, professional, and competent practice of law relies upon Interviewing, Counseling, and Negotiation. This simulation based course introduces knowledge and behaviors needed for effective interviewing, counseling, and negotiation. We will cover building working relationships with clients, gathering information from clients and from witnesses through effective questioning and listening, strategic objectives of organizing, developing and assessing decision alternatives and their consequences, negotiation strategies, and ethical issues arising in all these activities. </div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 3:35 - 5:15pm1387
BUS6235.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1412BUS6235.ACorporations & Other Business Assoc.Latham,Mark<div>This course will prepare you to understand and provide basic advice on different organizational forms for businesses, including corporations, limited liability companies, partnerships and sole proprietorships. We will also examine the law of agency. Course coverage will conclude with an introduction to securities regulation through the lens of insider trading.</div>4.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTRF 11:20 - 12:35pm1412
BUS6245.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1413BUS6245.AEmployment LawVogel,Joan<div>Examines areas of federal and state labor law which regulate the employment relationship and which provide minimum protection outside of collective bargaining. Major topics considered include wrongful discharge, post-employment liability, employee privacy, genetic and drug testing, employment discrimination, and wage and hour law.</div><div><br>Method of evaluation:  Final exam<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 2:10 - 3:25pm1413
BUS6255.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1388BUS6255.AIncome TaxationWillbanks,Stephanie<div>This course is an introduction to federal income taxation. Topics include: the concept of income; exclusions from income; deductions and credits available to individual non-business taxpayers and business taxpayers; sales and other dispositions of property; capital gains and losses; and tax policy. Class discussion focuses on applying the Internal Revenue Code and other legal authority to problems.</div><div><br>Method of evaluation: Class participation, written projects, and final examination.<br></div>4.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 9 - 11am1388
BUS6285.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1389BUS6285.ASecured TransactionsVogel,Joan<div>This course is an examination of the structure of the law of security interests in personal property from both practical and economic perspectives.  It examines the interests of all parties in secured transactions, particularly as a way of financing business. The focus of the course is on statutory analysis and problem-solving.<br> <br>Method of evaluation:  Final exam<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 2:10 - 3:25pm1389
BUS6360.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1390BUS6360.AIntroduction to eLawyering<div>This introductory course focuses on how new technologies affect the practice of law.  Topics are segmented in to three discrete areas of study:  Virtual Law Practice; Document Assembly and Expert Systems; and eDiscovery and Big Data.  The virtual law practice section offers students a brief glimpse of the promise of virtual practice as well as the practical details and ethical considerations of setting up such a practice.  The section covering document assembly and expert systems demonstrates the efficiency of these systems while offering students an opportunity to work hands-on with the technical tools.  The eDiscovery and big data section also covers aspects of knowledge management and the use of technology as a tool in litigation.   Practice management components are interwoven throughout the course with special emphasis on the intersection of these tools with the eDiscovery process.  Each section of the course will focus on what now constitutes legal practice and how technology has disrupted the status quo.  The course also considers the secondary effects on law, lawyering and the legal profession likely to arise from the addition of technology to many legal tasks.</div><div> </div><div>Method of evaluation:  Three projects and class participation will be the basis for the class grade.<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 9:55 - 11:10am1390
BUS6371.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1404BUS6371.AeLawyering: Cyber SecurityLatham,Mark<div>Organizations and individuals face a multitude of complex threats to confidentiality, availability and integrity of their data and other information in today’s cyber environs. These threats, as well as regulatory requirements, customer privacy concerns, organizational objectives and culture, are key considerations for the development of sound cybersecurity law.  eLawyering: Cybersecurity provides in-depth examination of the law dealing with the security of information and data and its corresponding technology.  Topics will include identify theft and identity protection laws, computer and network security, HIPPA, the SEC and financial industry cybersecurity regulations, social media and cloud computing privacy, social media and cloud computing click-wrap agreements, government surveillance and cyberwarfare/terrorism, and responses and remedies to cybersecurity concerns. Included are detailed analyses of significant legal case studies plus review of applicable international standards, and federal and state law.</div><div> </div><div>AWR is possible.</div><div> </div><div>Method of evaluation:  The grade will be based on a final paper and brief exercises.<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 2:10 - 3:25pm1404
CLI9302.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1414CLI9302.AEnvironmental and Natural Resources Law ClinicRuley,Doug<div>The Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic functions as a public interest environmental law firm with a collegial atmosphere that encourages interaction and feedback among students and Clinic faculty. Under the supervision of experienced environmental attorneys, student clinicians represent community groups and conservation organizations in real-world cases and projects. Although the clinic experience varies from student to student depending on the cases and projects assigned, student clinicians typically learn how to: communicate with clients, experts, agency personnel, opposing parties, and the media; conduct site visits; investigate scientific, technical, and other factual information; gather public records using FOIA and state public record laws; engage in specialized legal research; draft and file court briefs and pleadings in compliance with local rules; conduct written and oral discovery; analyze complex legal and factual materials; develop legal theories, claims, and arguments; engage in strategic decision-making; negotiate with opposing parties and craft settlement agreements; and comply with ethical and professional standards. The goal of the clinical experience is to develop well-rounded professionals with a high degree of skill and judgment grounded in service to clients and respect for the environment and the rule of law. While learning the craft of lawyering, students are expected to give careful attention to the ethical aspects of practicing law, and to evaluate alternative approaches to resolving environmental conflicts.<br>Practicum, Classroom Component, and Clinic Hours: Required classes two days/week—one hour fifteen minutes each class. A student’s schedule for the student’s other clinic hours will be determined by the individual student in consultation with clinical faculty.  Students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the required two/days a week ENRLC classes.</div><div>Legal Profession is strongly recommended for students enrolling in any clinic term. In addition, during the selection process, priority will generally be given to students who have successfully completed Administrative Law and Environmental Law (or another substantive environmental law course).</div><div>Registration: The ENRLC conducts interviews with interested applicants in the spring for the Fall Semester and in the fall for the Spring Semester. The ENRLC will also have a separate interview process for the summer. If a student is selected for the ENRLC by clinical faculty, the ENRLC will provide the Registrar’s Office with a list of all accepted applicants and will register them for the course. </div><div>Full-time program, 13-credits; students may not register for another course in the semester they take the ENRLC without the express consent of the Director of the Clinic.</div><div>Method of evaluation is pass/fail (PH, P, LP, F)<br>Clinic faculty are happy to supervise AWR papers, but clinic writing projects usually cannot fulfill the AWR because of their confidential nature. <br></div>GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 2:10 - 3:25pm1414
CLI9310.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1415CLI9310.ASouth Royalton Legal Clinic FTMay,James<div>Students work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel.  Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners.  Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship.  Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and investigate cases, draft pleadings and memoranda, participate in negotiations, and conduct evidentiary and appellate hearings, all under the supervision of one of the Clinic’s attorneys.  Participation in the Clinic can be counted toward completion of Vermont’s three-month clerkship requirement.  <br>It is recommended that students take Evidence and/or Trial Practice prior to enrolling in the Clinic, but neither is required.<br>*Classroom component:<br>Spring 2016-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks:  8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Spring sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks.<br>Registration:  You may register on-line for the SRLC as you do for any other VLS course.  <br>Assessment of students’ performance in the classroom portion and representation of clients will be made by the Clinic faculty on a pass/fail basis (“pass with honors” and “low pass” are other possible designations).  <br>NOTE: Part-time and full-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the Clinic’s introductory session; they should also realize that occasional conflicts may arise between court hearings (and similar commitments) and daytime classes, in which case client obligations prevail.  </div><div><br>Satisfies skills requirement.<br></div>10.0000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1415
CLI9312.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1416CLI9312.ASouth Royalton Legal Clinic PTMay,James<div>Students work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel.  Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners.  Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship.  Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and investigate cases, draft pleadings and memoranda, participate in negotiations, and conduct evidentiary and appellate hearings, all under the supervision of one of the Clinic’s attorneys.  Participation in the Clinic can be counted toward completion of Vermont’s three-month clerkship requirement.  <br>It is recommended that students take Evidence and/or Trial Practice prior to enrolling in the Clinic, but neither is required.<br>*Classroom component:<br>Spring 2016-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks:  8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Spring sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks.<br>Registration:  You may register on-line for the SRLC as you do for any other VLS course.  <br>Assessment of students’ performance in the classroom portion and representation of clients will be made by the Clinic faculty on a pass/fail basis (“pass with honors” and “low pass” are other possible designations).  <br>NOTE: Part-time and full-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the Clinic’s introductory session; they should also realize that occasional conflicts may arise between court hearings (and similar commitments) and daytime classes, in which case client obligations prevail.  </div><div><br>Satisfies skills requirement.<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1416
CLI9315.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1417CLI9315.ASouth Royalton Legal Clinic ClassMay,James<div>Classroom component:<br>Spring 2016-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks:  8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Spring sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks.<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1417
CLI9315.Bhttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1418CLI9315.BSouth Royalton Legal Clinic Class<div>Classroom component:<br>Spring 2016-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks:  8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Spring sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks.<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1418
CLI9326.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1391CLI9326.AAdvanced Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic 6Ruley,Doug<div>Advanced Environmental Natural Resources Law Clinic.</div>6.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1391
CLI9329.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1419CLI9329.AAdv Environmntal Natural Res. Clinic 9Ruley,Doug<div>Advanced Environmental Natural Resources Law Clinic.</div>9.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1419
CLI9333.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1420CLI9333.AAdvanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 13May,James<div>Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.</div>13.0000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1420
CLI9336.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1421CLI9336.AAdvanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 6May,James<div>Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.</div>6.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1421
CLI9339.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1422CLI9339.AAdvanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 9May,James<div>Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.</div>9.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1422
CLI9350.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1423CLI9350.ACriminal Law ClinicSaxman,AnnaGP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 5:25 - 7:25pm1423
CLI9405.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1424CLI9405.ADispute Resolution Clinic IBarone,Robin<div>This clinical offering trains students to mediate. While training, students observe and will later conduct mediations in various Vermont and New Hampshire courts. The course begins with <br>an intensive skills session in the form of a day-long training session scheduled for Monday, January 4th  before the start of spring classes. Attendance at this session is MANDATORY. Students interested in taking the course MUST attend the Monday session. No exceptions can be made. </div><div>There will also be one Saturday training session, presently scheduled for January 23rd. This session is also mandatory. Weekly seminars will focus on course readings regarding conflict theory, mediation techniques, litigation strategies, public policy and social justice issues, as well as ethical and licensing concerns. A portion of each class will be devoted to clinic-style rounds, enabling students to present the cases they have observed or mediated for discussion and feedback.  Students will be asked to analyze mediation practice and conflict theory from the various perspectives of mediator, attorney advocate, parties and client. Professor Barone administers small claims mediation programs in two New Hampshire courts (Lebanon District Court and Littleton District Court): students will be able to observe and later mediate in those courts. (Vermont small claims court mediation programs are currently suspended for budgetary reasons.) Professor Barone will also arrange shadowing opportunities with practicing Vermont attorney-mediators, so that the students can observe civil mediations at the Superior Court level.  Students will need to provide their own transportation to and from the various courts throughout Vermont, and/or to Lebanon NH and Littleton NH.<br> <br>Satisfies skills requirement.<br>Method of evaluation:  Pass/Fail; AWR-No.<br></div>4.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 8:30 - 10:10am1424
CLI9411.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1425CLI9411.ASemester In Practice (SIP)Cimini,Christine<div>The Semester in Practice Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice.  The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Field-mentors are experienced lawyers who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The SiP provides an opportunity – through observation, participation, practice, and reflection – to improve students’ legal knowledge and skills and to inform and expand their vision of what the practice and profession of law can be.  <br>Components and Requirements of the SiP Course:  There are two different components to the SiP program:  a practicum component and a classroom component.  Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program.  For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site field mentor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.  All students are required to participate in a five-day on-line orientation prior to the first day of work on-site.  <br>Credits and Grading:  students enrolled in the full time program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits.  Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded.  <br>Eligibility:  <br>1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. <br>2. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials.  (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). <br>Application Deadlines:<br>1. In order to participate in a Fall SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st.<br>2. In order to participate in a Spring SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.  <br> <br>Satisfies the skills requirement.<br> <br></div>11.0000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1425
CLI9412.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1426CLI9412.ASemester In Practice ClassCimini,Christine<div>The Semester in Practice Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice.  The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Field-mentors are experienced lawyers who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The SiP provides an opportunity – through observation, participation, practice, and reflection – to improve students’ legal knowledge and skills and to inform and expand their vision of what the practice and profession of law can be.  <br>Components and Requirements of the SiP Course:  There are two different components to the SiP program:  a practicum component and a classroom component.  Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program.  For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site field mentor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.  All students are required to participate in a five-day on-line orientation prior to the first day of work on-site.  <br>Credits and Grading:  students enrolled in the full time program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits.  Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded.  <br>Eligibility:  <br>1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. <br>2. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials.  (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). <br>Application Deadlines:<br>1. In order to participate in a Fall SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st.<br>2. In order to participate in a Spring SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.  <br> <br>Satisfies the skills requirement.<br> <br></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1426
CLI9425.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1427CLI9425.AJD Part-Time ExternshipWhite,Jeffry<div>The Part-Time JD Externship Program offers a field-based experiential opportunity in which student’s apprentice (without compensation) to lawyers in all areas of practice.  The part-time externship program is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Field-supervisors are experienced lawyers who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The Part-Time Externship provides students an opportunity to participate in a range of lawyering tasks so that they develop an improved understanding of the legal process and of legal problems at all stages of resolution.</div><div>Components and Requirements of the Part-Time JD Externship Course:  There are two different components to the Part-Time JD Externship program:  a practicum component and an academic component.  Students are provided supervision in each component of the course.  For the practicum component, students are assigned an on-site field supervisor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.  Externship faculty has the option on a semester-by-semester basis of doing either individual conference sessions or regular classroom sessions.  All students are required to participate in an orientation during the first week of the externship semester.</div><div>Credits and Grading:  Students may earn from four to six credits.  Credits are awarded on a pass/fail basis.  Students enrolled in the part-time program must work three hours a week for 15 weeks for each credit earned.  For example, a six credit externship requires 2.4 days or 18 hours of work per week.  A mandatory seminar component is included within the pass/fail evaluation, and there is no additional credit for the seminar.  Students take classes on-campus during the semester in addition to participating in a JD externship.</div><div>Eligibility:</div><div>1.      Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate.</div><div>2.      Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials.  (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form).</div><div>Application Deadlines:</div><div>1.      In order to participate in a Fall Part-Time JD Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by April 1st.</div><div>2.      In order to participate in a Spring Part-Time JD Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.</div><div> </div><div>Satisfies the skills requirement.  AWR: No<br></div>GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bR 5:30 - 6:30pm1427
CLI9427.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1428CLI9427.AEnergy ClinicJones,Kevin<div>Through this course students will be introduced to the practical aspects of real world energy projects.  Students will become involved in some aspect of the development or evaluation of real life energy projects (e.g. solar PV, energy efficiency, electric vehicle infrastructure) and may have the opportunity to support the legal and policy requirements of a particular project or through the development of model legal documents to facilitate future projects.  Students will be introduced to the state and federal statutes, rules, tax codes, and ordinances that apply to the development of energy projects particularly those that promote sustainability at the community level.  Given the project development cycle while students may only be involved in one or more transactional elements of the project the goal of the course will be to also provide a framework for understanding how their specific component fits within the complete project cycle.  Specific projects undertaken by the energy clinic will be selected in order to support some social justice or environmental benefit including community ownership, greenhouse gas reduction, or low income energy affordability goals.  Classroom instruction will be through IEE faculty, fellows, and guest lecturers. </div>4.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1428
CLI9428.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1429CLI9428.AFood and Agriculture ClinicRenner,Jamie<div>Clinic:  In the Food and Agriculture Clinic, students collaborate with local, regional, national and international partner organizations to develop and publicly disseminate law, policy and market tools that provide guidance to food system constituencies, including farmers, food entrepreneurs, consumers, legislators, and advocates, on how to advance law, policy and market initiatives that directly or indirectly promote (1) environmentally and economically sustainable agriculture, (2) public health, (3) food access and food security, (4) local and regional agriculture economies and (5) animal welfare.  Student clinicians participate in all aspects of project development and execution, gaining experience in both advocacy and the business behind it.  Skills practiced in the clinic — including problem solving, cross-professional collaboration, legal research, legal writing, project management, legal resource design, interviewing, public speaking, media and marketing — are transferable to any advocacy context.</div><div>Method of evaluation:  Clinic is high pass/low pass/fail.  </div>4.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1429
CLI9429.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1430CLI9429.AFood and Agriculture SeminarRenner,Jamie<div>Seminar:  In the Food and Agriculture Clinic seminar, students explore the substantive laws and advocacy skills that underlie their clinic project work.</div><div> </div><div>The seminar is a letter grade A-F.  </div>2.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1430
CLI9430.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1431CLI9430.AJudicial ExternshipWhite,Jeffry<div>The Judicial Externship Program offers a field-based experiential opportunity in which student’s apprentice (without compensation) in judicial chambers.  The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial clerk.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision-making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develop writing, research and analytical skills.</div><div>Components and Requirements of the Judicial Externship:  There are two different components to the Judicial Externship:  a practicum component and a classroom component.  Students are provided supervision in each component of the course.  For the practicum component, students are assigned an on-site judicial supervisor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.  All students are required to participate in a one-day orientation prior to the first day of work on-site.</div><div>Credits and Grading:  Students enrolled in the judicial externship program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits.  Experiential credits are awarded on a pass/fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded.</div><div>Eligibility:</div><div>1.      Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate.</div><div>2.      Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials.  (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form).</div><div>Application Deadlines:</div><div>1.      In order to participate in a Fall Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st.</div><div>2.      In order to participate in a Spring Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.</div><div>Satisfies the skills requirement.<br>AWR: No<br></div>11.0000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1431
CLI9431.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1434CLI9431.AJD Externship - ClassJeffry WhiteGP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1434
CLI9437.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1405CLI9437.AAdvanced Energy ClinicJones,Kevin<div>The Advanced Energy Clinic is a four credit course offered in the fall and/or spring semester.  Through this course students will explore at an advanced level, the practical aspects of real world energy projects (generation, transmission, distribution, and/or end-use) from the stage of conceptualization, development, contracting, financing regulatory approval and construction.  Students will be further exposed to the state and federal statutes, rules, tax codes, and ordinances that apply to the development of energy projects particularly those that promote sustainability at the community level.  Students will also review and/or develop purchased power and other commercial agreements governing these projects.  Classroom instruction will be through IEE faculty, fellows, and guest lecturers.  </div>4.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1405
CLI9450.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1406CLI9450.ALand Use ClinicGjessing,Catherine<div>The Land Use Clinic combines a two-credit classroom component with a four-credit placement experience. The classroom component of the course introduces students to substantive issues that commonly arise in land use practice, to the policies and procedures underlying Vermont’s Environmental Court and the Vermont State Land Use statute, and to the competencies that lawyers need for effective representation in this area of law. This land use clinic complements the environmental law program at VLS by providing students the opportunity to understand how environmental and other land use laws are developed, implemented, administered and enforced, and the role lawyers play in that process. The four credit placement component of the course requires thirteen weeks at fourteen hours per week, or two days per week, at the placement. The two credit classroom component of the course requires fourteen weeks of class at two-hours per class, though some of the classes may be frontloaded.</div>6.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 5:25 - 7:25pm1406
CRI7307.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1334CRI7307.ACriminal Practice & ProcedureSaxman,Anna<div>The course will focus on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and the 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Students will examine the constitutional principles of criminal procedure and how those principles are actually utilized in practice. This course will give students the basic understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional criminal law and procedure while at the same time learning the practical application of theory to practice. The course curriculum will focus attention on: bail, search and seizure, the right against self-incrimination and involuntary confessions, discovery, Double Jeopardy,  Confrontation Clause,  the right to effective assistance of counsel, judgment of acquittal motions,  jury instructions and sentencing. Students will have the opportunity to draft and argue motions in criminal pre-trial and trial litigation. This course is a blend of the practical and theoretical, and students can expect to leave this class knowing how to analyze factual scenarios using constitutional criminal law cases and the Rules. Students will be expected to argue motions in front of the class as well as serve as judge’s ruling on the motions made in class. Students will have the opportunity to improve their legal analysis, writing and oral argument skills.</div>4.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 5:25 - 7:10pm1334
CRI7350.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1335CRI7350.ACriminal Law ClinicSaxman,Anna<div>This course gives students the opportunity to experience criminal practice in either prosecution or defense settings under the close supervision of our distinguished practitioner-faculty members.  Students will be placed in the prosecution, defense or appellate defense practice settings, and will receive classroom instruction once per week for two hours covering foundational aspects of Vermont criminal.  Students will then apply classroom concepts in real criminal cases, working under close supervision of the classroom faculty, Anna Saxman (Vermont Deputy Defender General) David Cahill (Deputy State’s Attorney, WRJ) and Brian Marsicovetere (Marsicovetere Law Group, PC) contracted to provide public defender services in Windsor County).<br>This is a 6 credit course: <br>2 credit hours of classroom – once a week for 2 hours; and<br>4 credit hours of clinic work – twice a week, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, for a total of 13 hours.  <br>The course will be graded High Pass/Pass/Low Pass/Fail. <br>Enrollment is limited to 6 students. <br>This course satisfies the skills requirement.<br>Placements will be distributed as follows: <br>              Windsor County State’s Attorney’s Office (2 students)<br> Students will co-prosecute DUI and other misdemeanor cases.  Motions will be filed in court to admit students under the student practice rule.  Practical experience will include taking depositions, responding to, drafting, and arguing motions, examining and cross examining witnesses and participating in jury selection and trial.  <br>Vermont Office of Defender General/ Appellate Defense (2 students)<br>            Students will be assigned 1 to 2 cases per semester. They will read the record, analyze the facts and the law, research, draft, and ultimately write the appellate brief in the case. The students may return to argue their cases before the Vermont Supreme Court the following semester under the student practice rules. <br> <br>            Marsicovetere Law Group, PC/ Public Defender (2 students)<br>Students in the clinic will be assigned specific misdemeanor cases and will be closely supervised throughout the process of each case, arraignment through disposition.  Students will experience the discovery process, research and draft applicable motions to suppress, dismiss, or compel further discovery, and, depending on the complexity of the motion, take part in the hearing accompanied by a supervising attorney.  If applicable, they will work on settlement negotiations with the state.  If the case proceeds on a trial track, then they will work with the supervising attorney in all aspects of trial preparation.</div><div> </div>6.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 5:25 - 7:25pm1335
DIV7620.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1336DIV7620.ANative Americans and the LawHoffmann,Hillary<div>This course will focus on the constitutional, statutory and jurisprudential rules that make up the field of Federal Indian Law.  Attention will be given to the historical framework from which the rules were derived.  After tracing the development of the underlying legal doctrines which are prominent today, we will consider subject-specific areas of Indian Law like hunting and fishing rights, stewardship of natural resources, economic development and protection of religion and cultural lifestyles.  <br> <br>Method of evaluation:  A final presentation and a final exam or a final paper.<br></div>GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 12:45 - 2pm1336
ENV5105.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1337ENV5105.AAdministrative LawHoffmann,Hillary<div>Administrative law is the law relating to administrative agencies, which almost every practicing lawyer encounters at one or more points in her career.  This class focuses on federal agencies - what they are (executive or independent), what they do (adjudicate, regulate, or investigate), and what constrains their authority (the Constitution, Congress, and the judiciary).  Lawyers who work for agencies, regulated industries, and public interest groups must understand these basic principles of administrative law. This course uses a problem focus to stress practical application of administrative law. </div><div><br>Method of evaluation:  Final exam.</div><div><br>AWR (No)<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 9:55 - 11:10am1337
ENV5112.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1392ENV5112.AScience for Environmental LawPease,Craig<div>This class: <br>            (1) Broadly surveys the science most relevant to environmental law, including  i) climate science, ii) air pollution including both atmospheric chemistry and health impacts, iii) toxicology of pesticides, food additives and industrial chemicals, iv) forest and endangered species management, and v) human population and resource use. <br>            (2) Discusses how scientific thinking and culture differs from legal thinking and culture. Thus, the course goes beyond summarizing what science currently knows, also asking why science knows what it does, how scientists gather data and draw inferences, and how scientists themselves evaluate the reliability of scientific information. <br>            (3) Explores some of the key challenges in effectively using science in legal and policy decision making. The course will develop several different perspectives on this, including i) looking in detail at the science underlying particular legal cases, ii) looking at the challenges inherent in translating science into regulatory standards, and iii) examining the roles of major scientific institutions in supplying advice and analysis to policymakers.  Broadly, the student will develop an understanding of the interface of science, law and policy, through the study of several specific case studies.</div><div><br> </div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTF 9:55 - 11:10am1392
ENV5115.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1338ENV5115.AEnvironmental LawMears, David<div>This is a survey course that will introduce students to the basic concepts of U.S. environmental law.  Students will trace the development of this complex and diverse body of law from its common law origins through the development of modern statutory and regulatory programs.  Goals of the course include (1) familiarity with the major federal environmental laws, their underpinnings in the common law, and the competing approaches to public policy reflected in each statute, (2) understanding of the cooperative federal-state governance structure and administrative law framework as applied in U.S. environmental law, and exposure to and the opportunity to practice skills used in environmental law including public speaking, advocacy, legal analysis, writing, receiving and providing feedback on work product, negotiating resolutions of disputes, and the application of legal process.  Themes in the course include global climate disruption, interdisciplinary approaches to environmental problem-solving, the role of the ethical attorney in environmental disputes and environmental justice.  Students will explore environmental law through reading case law, statutes, regulations and articles.</div><div> </div><div>Method of Evaluation:  Writing assignments, class participation and in class final examination</div><div><br>AWR:  No <br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 11:20 - 12:35pm1338
ENV5205.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1339ENV5205.AAir Pollution Law and PolicyScott,Jessica<div>This course will cover the major regulatory approaches embodied in the Clean Air Act, including health-based ambient standards, technology-based standards, joint state-federal implementation under the principle of "cooperative federalism," direct EPA regulation using industry-by-industry approaches, pollution trading programs, permitting, and enforcement. The primary focus of the course will be on stationary source pollution, with a brief introduction to mobile source pollution. Students will be expected to read the statutory and regulatory provisions carefully, and to consider the science and policies which animate them. The course will require students to take an in-depth look at how the statute and regulations are implemented, both administratively and through the courts. As a foundation for interpreting and applying the Clean Air Act, students will learn about the health and environmental impacts of ozone, fine particulates, hazardous air pollutants, acid rain, and climate change, as well as the technologies used to address them. </div><div>Air Pollution is a specialized environmental law course most suitable for students who already have some experience with administrative law and environmental law.</div><div>MELP and JD-MELP Joint Degree students who have completed Environmental Law should have a sufficient background for this course. <br>JD-only students are strongly encouraged to take Administrative Law and Environmental Law before enrolling in Air Pollution.</div><div> </div><div>Method of evaluation: in-class exam.</div><div>AWR: no.<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 2:10 - 3:25pm1339
ENV5220.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1380ENV5220.AEnvironmental Economics and MarketsJones,Kevin<div>The course introduces students to the discipline of environmental economics and exposes them to debates over the use of market-based instruments in environmental, energy, and climate policy. It introduces students to basic economics and finance concepts, examines key principles about market behavior and efficiency, and applies these basic elements and concepts to common environmental problems and actual case studies. Economic concepts are applied to environmental and natural resource policy areas including water resources, energy, food and agriculture, land use, forests, as well as, air and water pollution.   </div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 8:30 - 9:45am1380
ENV5228.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1385ENV5228.AEnergy Regulation and the EnvironmentJones,KevinEnergy Law and Policy or Instructor's Permission<div>This course builds on the fall course Energy Law and Policy in a Carbon-Constrained World. The course exposes students to the legal, economic, and structural issues involved in both energy regulation and energy markets, focusing on electricity. The course examines the evolution, theory and techniques of the monopoly regulation. Students learn how utilities are regulated. We examine rate setting, rate design and regulatory alternatives to traditional rates such as performance-based rates. The course then examines evolving competitive, wholesale electric markets including the development of Regional Transmission Organizations and rules and practice of the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission. The course also exposes students to the latest approaches for a clean energy future including energy efficiency, demand response and renewable energy strategies while exploring current legal and policy issues.<br> <br>Prerequisites: Energy Law and Policy or Instructor's Permission.<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 9:55 - 11:10am1385
ENV5239.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1393ENV5239.ALand Transactions and FinanceEcheverria,John<div>Lawyers and land use professionals, whether representing land owners, developers, regulators, development opponents, or land conservation organizations, need to understand the same basics of land transactions, development and finance.  The course examines how land is transferred, including an introduction to the title system, title insurance, purchase contracts and deeds.  The course also provides an introduction to the private development process and exposes students to modern real estate financing and investment decision-making.  Course participants will engage in the negotiation and drafting of a commercial purchase agreement.  </div><div> </div><div>Method of evaluation:  take-home exam</div><div><br>AWR:  No<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 11:20 - 12:35pm1393
ENV5246.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1394ENV5246.AWater QualityParenteau,Patrick<div>This course takes an in depth look at the Clean Water Act and related statutes such as the Safe Drinking Water Act, The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act (“Ocean Dumping Act”) and the Coastal Zone Management Act. Common law remedies are also considered. Guest speakers will provide additional perspectives.<br> <br>Method of Evaluation:  One commentary (1000 words) and take-home final take home.  </div><div><br>AWR (No)<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 8:30 - 9:45am1394
ENV5303.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1395ENV5303.AAdvanced Energy Writing SeminarDworkin,MichaelEither Energy Law & Policy In a Carbon Constrained World or Energy Regulation, Markets and Environment (previously or concurrently) or instructor’s permission.<div>Seminar topics will include proposals for reducing the economic and environmental costs of meeting energy needs.  Because of its importance for both finance and emissions, the electricity sector will be a major focus of this class.  Weekly readings will focus on textual analysis of writings that have materially changed the world. Each student will need to produce a significant written paper based on sophisticated research and thinking about a key area in energy policy and law. Research projects  may be coordinated with (but must supplement) LL.M. or M.E.L.P. requirements.   Short written assignments will be required every week, in addition to progress on the major writing assignment.  <br>Successful students should emerge with many of the skills useful for contributing to the work of an energy commission, a law firm with an energy practice, an environmental group addressing energy issues, or a company delivering energy or efficiency services.<br> <br>Prerequisite:  Either Energy Law & Policy In a Carbon Constrained World or Energy Regulation, Markets and Environment (previously or concurrently) or instructor’s permission.<br> <br>Method of evaluation:  Final paper (AWR ) ten short papers and class participation.<br></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 3:35 - 5:15pm1395
ENV5306.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1435ENV5306.AComparative Environmental Law Research<div>This seminar is a research and writing seminar that will provide a framework and faculty supervision for students to engage in comparative environmental law research. While the seminar is designed primarily to support VLS students participating in the U.S.-Asia environmental law research projects, the seminar is sufficiently broad to accommodate students interested in researching the environmental law systems of other countries. The seminar will provide some basic introduction and background on comparative law and methodology, a brief introduction to Chinese environmental law and governance, and other environmental laws in Southeast Asia countries, and research methods and resources. Students will learn basic comparative law methodology and research skills related to navigating a foreign legal system and generate a series of research reports or a publishable paper at the end of the course.<br>This course will focus on helping students design/refine their research project proposals and critiquing their research and draft papers. </div><div> </div><div>Spring 2016:  ENV5306; 1 credit continuation-registration must be added with faculty sponsor<br></div>1.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1435
ENV5342.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1407ENV5342.ALegal Adaptation to Global WarmingEcheverria,John<div>Adaptation is a necessary and unavoidable complement to mitigation measures required to address the challenge of climate change.  Legal Adaptation to Climate Change addresses how rising sea levels, higher temperatures, changes in precipitation and other physical consequences of climate change will put pressure on established laws and legal institutions that were developed  based on the assumption of a stable climate.    The course will also explore potential new legal and policy tools for maintaining economic, social, political and environmental security in dramatically changing circumstances. The course explores climate change adaptation in both the domestic and international contexts.</div><div><br>Method of evaluation:  Final paper; AWR (yes)<br></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 3:35 - 5:15pm1407
ENV5346.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1403ENV5346.ANew Frontiers in Environmental PoliciesScanlan,Melissa<div>This seminar explores the proposition that successfully coping with today’s environmental threats requires deeper challenges to our prevailing system of political economy than mainstream environmentalism in the United States has been willing to mount. It develops the idea that a new American environmentalism is needed and with it new environmental policy and law that go beyond the traditional realm of environmental affairs. The nature of the modern corporation and its role in politics and in an increasingly globalized marketplace; consumerism and commercialism and the lifestyles they offer; the overriding priority routinely accorded economic growth; social injustice and its links to environmental prospects; the anthropocentric, materialistic and contempocentric values that currently dominate in American culture; and the prospects for a new environmental politics are among the topics that will be examined. The question will be raised whether it is desirable and possible to transition to a new economic model where the priority is to sustain human and natural communities, and, if so, what new policies and politics might promote such a transition. </div><div>Method of evaluation:  Research paper</div><div>AWR:  Yes</div><div>Limited enrollment.</div><div> </div>2.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 3:35 - 5:15pm1403
ENV5349.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1249ENV5349.ARegulating the Marine EnvironmentKinvin Wroth<div>This course examines the interaction of state, federal, and international regimes in the regulation of the marine environment. After a brief historical introduction, the course looks at private rights, the public trust, and the police power in the context of state authority over coastal lands and navigable waters. We then consider the sources of federal power over marine and maritime matters and the relationship of federal preemption of state law and federal incentives for state regulation. The course also briefly addresses the interplay between these domestic regulatory powers and applicable principles and rules of international law. These relationships will be illustrated primarily through issues raised by the marine environment as a source of energy—on the one hand, the nonrenewable resources of the seabed and, on the other hand, the winds, waves, currents, and temperatures of the sea itself.</div><div> </div><div>Method of Evaluation: Take-home examination or paper on approved topic. </div><div> </div><div>AWR:  By agreement with professor.<br></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 3:35 - 5:15pm1249
ENV5350.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1396ENV5350.ARisk AssessmentPease,Craig<div>Learn about risk assessment by living it. In this class, the instructor and students will work together to write a comment letter, petition, white paper and/or FOIA (Freedom of Information Act) request. Recent class projects include a NEPA comment letter, asking the Colorado Department of Transportation to quantify the increased risk of asthma, heart disease and lung cancer from elevated air pollution faced by those living immediately adjacent (within 400 m) of the proposed rerouting of I-70 East in Denver, a petition to have mercury listed as a criteria air pollutant under the Clean Air Act, and a white paper that placed a dollar value on the ecological impacts of groundwater contamination from coal fly ash impoundments and landfills. There will be different projects each year.  <br>The students in the class will complete a series of assignments pertaining to this comment letter, petition, white paper or FOIA request. Roughly half of the class time is devoted to this project. The other half of the class time entails developing an overarching framework for risk assessment, illustrated when possible using the facts from the class project. <br>The risk assessment framework falls roughly under four headings. First, we spend several weeks reading and critiquing, just as a scientist would, several key scientific papers pertaining to the class project. To provide structure for this exercise, the students apply the facts in these scientific papers to the conceptual ideas in Science for Business, Law and Journalism, coauthored by the instructor. Our goal in this exercise is not just to understand the assumptions and reasoning of the science underlying our project, but also to learn methods of evaluating and critiquing scientific information more generally. Second, we spend several classes undertaking a risk assessment primer. This includes a simple discussion of very tiny numbers (i.e. parts per million), key concepts (e.g. risk, uncertainity, Red Book risk assessment paradigm), and the leading risk assessment cases. Third, it turns out that unschooled human intuition is not very good at assessing risk. We explore the scientific literature showing that there is a critical distinction between perceived and actual risk, and we apply these results to risk communication and management. Fourth, we undertake a broad comparative analysis of social institutions for managing risk. This discussion is also closely tied to our projects; in recent years, this has entailed discussion of mercury regulation under the Clean Air Act, including recent litigation. We compare the command-and-control regulatory approach to tort law, cost-benefit analyses, economic markets, and even insurance, all being examples of institutions that society has developed to control or reduce risk. We ask how each institution operates, and also its comparative strengths and limitations. </div><div> </div><div>This course is taught by a scientist. The perspective is that of a scientist who is trying to convince agencies to use good science in rulemaking,  and trying to convince lawyers to use good science in litigation (as contrasted, for example, to the focus of attorneys on representing their clients’ interests). Thus, this is a course about science and law, taught from the perspective of a scientist. </div><div><br>Satisfies perspective requirement.<br></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 9:55 - 11:10am1396
ENV5381.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1397ENV5381.AAgriculture and Food Entrepreneur Lawyering SkillManzelli,AmyENV 5381 Agriculture and Food Entrepreneurial Law teaches the nuts and bolts of providing legal services to farmers and food entrepreneurs (producers/retailers/restaurants), drawing from the rich examples of farmer and food entrepreneurs locally. Such skills are needed to equip students with real world legal knowledge for those students seeking to provide legal services in this area or who wish to start an entrepreneurial career in food and agriculture. Classes will occur for the first 8 weeks of the semester, starting with Thursday January 14th and ending with Thursday March 3rd, to present the substantive content. For the rest of March and the first week of April (Tuesday March 8th through Thursday April 14th), no regular classes will be held. Students will work on a writing project, attend public/governmental meetings, and have regular contact with professors via email, phone, video-conference, and the like. For the last two weeks of the semester (Tuesday, April 19th through Thursday, April 28th), classes will resume, consisting of role-playing and discussion of content as applied to a hypothetical legal situation 3.00000000000000GP0|#f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f;L0|#0f98844b7-83b3-454b-b01d-8aaf56f6953f|Spring 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 5:25 - 7:30pmBoepple,Beth1397

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