ADR6410.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=257ADR6410.AAlternative Dispute ResolutionVogel,JoanThis class presents the theory and practice of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration that constitute the foundation of alternative dispute resolution (ADR). This survey course focuses on the theory and practice of these techniques that are used as alternatives or as additions to formal litigation. Students will examine the different theories, approaches and the wide range of issues (e.g. legal, economic, sociological, moral, ethical, psychological, political to name a few) that arise in the selection and application of these dispute resolution techniques. In addition to classroom discussion, students will participate in simulation exercises in order to engage the different techniques as a neutral, an advocate and a disputant. Students cannot take this course and Environmental Dispute Resolution or ADR & the Environment. Method of evaluation: Class participation and papers. GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 12:45 - 2pm257
ADR6413.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=258ADR6413.AMediation AdvocacyPowers,DonaldTHIS IS AN INTENSIVE COURSE TO BE OFFERED OVER THE COURSE OF 4 DAYS. The designated days are: Fridays: January 23 and February 6; 2:10-6:30. Saturdays: January 24 and February 7; 8:00-6:30. Representing clients in a mediation setting is an essential skill for the modern lawyer. Mediation Advocacy teaches students how to be effective advocates for their clients in the mediation setting. This course will allow students to examine the theory and practice of how to effectively represent clients in mediation. Students will develop this competency by exploring the various models of mediation. The course will take the student through all aspects of client representation from counseling regarding ADR methods, selecting cases for mediation, selecting a mediator, writing mediation briefs and agreements, pivotal legal issues, and effective advocacy in the mediation session. This course will rely heavily on role-plays to practice many of the skills needed to be effective in mediation. Classroom time will consist of lectures, discussion, role-play and critique. GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bS 8 - 6:30pm, F 2:10 - 6:30pm258
ADR6420.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=259ADR6420.ANegotiationWhite,JudithTHIS IS AN INTENSIVE COURSE TO BE OFFERED OVER THE COURSE OF 4 DAYS. The designated days are: Fridays: January 23 and February 6; 2:10-6:30. Saturdays: January 24 and February 7; 8:00-6:30. This course is designed to help you explore what it means to be an effective negotiator and to practice the skills needed to improve on this important life skill. You will be expected to learn and apply theories from a broad range of disciplines including law, economics, psychology, sociology and management. These theories will be discussed and debated in class discussions and practice through highly interactive simulations. The course examines the dynamics, constraints, and skills needed to be an effective negotiator. It focuses equally on the use of negotiation in deal making and to resolve disputes. We will conduct simulations in a variety of contexts including face-to-face, over the phone and email. We will explore how dynamics change when moving from two-party to multi-party negotiations and look at how ethics should influence our behavior. Readings will need to be completed ahead of time and a final project will be completed after classes. This is a limited enrollment course (24) Satisfies skills requirement. MELP: Distributional requirement - Alternative Dispute Resolution. Method of Evaluation: Performance in simulations, participation in Class and a final negotiation (Does not satisfy AWR)GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bS 8:30 - 6:30pm, F 2:30 - 6:30pm259
ADR6425.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=260ADR6425.AInterviewing, Counseling, and NegotiationBarry,MargaretThis simulation-based course introduces knowledge and behaviors needed to accomplish interviewing and counseling and negotiation tasks successfully. Topics include working relationships with clients, gathering information from clients effectively, and helping clients make decisions in both dispute resolving and transactional contexts.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 3:35 - 5:15pm260
ADR6450.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=261ADR6450.ADispute Resolution Writing SeminarBarry,MargaretThis seminar provides an opportunity to explore emerging issues in dispute resolution through research and writing. The goal is to produce a publishable quality article.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 3:35 - 5:15pm261
BUS6235.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=262BUS6235.ACorporationsTaub,JenniferThis course covers how to organize a business enterprise from a legal perspective. We compare the strengths and limitations of different structures for businesses, including sole-proprietorships, general partnerships, limited liability companies, and corporations. Supplementing the casebook, we learn about business financing, management and shareholder activism, by following in real-time the activities of ten large US corporations. We also study the law of agency, corporate governance and corporate social responsibility. The course also considers corporate political spending and power in light of the Citizens United decision. Method of evaluation: Final exam GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTRF 9:55 - 11:10am262
BUS6245.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=263BUS6245.AEmployment LawVogel,JoanExamines areas of federal and state labor law which regulate the employment relationship and which provide minimum protection outside of collective bargaining. Major topics considered include wrongful discharge, post-employment liability, employee privacy,genetic and drug testing, employment discrimination, and wage and hour law. Method of evaluation: Final exam GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 2:10 - 3:25pm263
BUS6255.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=264BUS6255.AIncome TaxationFirestone,DavidThis course is an introduction to federal income taxation. Topics include: the concept of income; exclusions from income; deductions and credits available to individual non-business taxpayers and business taxpayers; sales and other dispositions of property; capital gains and losses. Method of evaluation: Final examGP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTW 3:35 - 5:15pm264
BUS6262.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=265BUS6262.ASocial Enterprise LawSchmidt,BetsyThis course examines legal structures that social and environmental enterprises currently use to accomplish their missions-nonprofit organizations, traditional for-profits, L3Cs, benefit corporations, cooperatives and other business forms that place "Planet" and "People" ahead of or on an equal footing with "Profit." The course contemplates the advantages and disadvantages of using these forms to accomplish these missions, how they should be adopted or modified, and whether society should devise other structures to further these missions. Students will examine these issues through the lens of four existing organizations-1) a for-profit, 2) a nonprofit, 3) a hybrid, and 4) a cooperative or employee owned organization. Students will be evaluated on their participation in the classroom and with the virtual tools such as wikis and discussion forums, as well as on a final White Paper that suggests ways public policy towards social and environmental enterprises should be improved. *PLEASE NOTE: This course will be a hybrid distance-learning/in person class. We will meet twice in person and virtually the rest of the semester, using the Blackboard (Lexis Nexis) platform. We will make active use of videoconferencing, wikis, blogs, and discussion forums. Vermont Law School students will join law, business and public policy students from other universities in the virtual part of this class, and they will be invited to meet the other students in person during a weekend meeting.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bR 5:25 - 7:05pm265
BUS6280.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=266BUS6280.ASalesFirestone,DavidThis course covers primarily Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Article 2 governs sales of goods. Coverage includes formation and modification of contracts for sale, Article 2's statute of frauds, warranties, and risk allocations when goods are stored or transported, breach, remedies for sellers and buyers, and contractual limitations on remedies. The course will include references to consumer rights as well as comparisons between the common law of contract and the Code's rules and concepts. Method of evaluation: Final examGP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 11:20 - 1pm266
BUS6290.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=267BUS6290.ASecurities RegulationTaub,JenniferThis course introduces students to the federal laws and regulations designed to protect investors in the U.S. We identify the registration and disclosure requirements for securities offerings as well as the ongoing disclosure and other requirements associated with secondary market distribution. We explore the context and content of the first federal securities law of the 1930s through the most recent law affecting the financial markets, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. We cover the potential liability of various players involved in the offering and sale of securities, including issuers, officers, directors, brokers, dealers, attorneys, auditors and other participants. We consider issues regarding "insider" trading. Brief study is also made of the role of crowd funding after the JOBS Act. Method of evaluation: Take home exam or Paper (AWR: Yes for paper)GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 12:45 - 2pm267
BUS6332.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=268BUS6332.APro Sports and the LawPorto,BrianThis course introduces students to the legal issues raised by the operation of professional sports leagues, labor relations in professional sports, and the regulation of sports agents. Beyond that, students will consider issues of racial equity, gender equity, health and safety, and intellectual property that arise in professional sports. Method of evaluation: client-advice letter and a research paper (AWR: Yes for research paper)GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 3:35 - 5:15pm268
BUS6360.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=269BUS6360.AIntroduction to eLawyeringEicks,JeanneThis introductory course focuses on how new technologies affect the practice of law. Topics are segmented in to three discrete areas of study: Virtual Law Practice; Document Assembly and Expert Systems; and eDiscovery and Big Data. The virtual law practice section offers students a brief glimpse of the promise of virtual practice as well as the practical details and ethical considerations of setting up such a practice. The section covering document assembly and expert systems demonstrates the efficiency of these systems while offering students an opportunity to work hands-on with the technical tools. The eDiscovery and big data section also covers aspects of knowledge management and the use of technology as a tool in litigation. Practice management components are interwoven throughout the course with special emphasis on the intersection of these tools with the eDiscovery process. Each section of the course will focus on what now constitutes legal practice and how technology has disrupted the status quo. The course also considers the secondary effects on law, lawyering and the legal profession likely to arise from the addition of technology to many legal tasks. Method of evaluation: Three projects and class participation will be the basis for the class grade. GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 9:55 - 11:10am269
BUS6903.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=270BUS6903.ABusiness Topics: Law Practice ManagementKnapp,JamesThis course will examine the opportunities and challenges in entering private practice with a particular focus on practice in solo and small firms. The course will cover the topics including opportunities in private practice, corporate or government practice and other law related careers. The principal focus of the class is on the process of opening a firm, joining an existing firm and how to be successful in the practice of law. The course will emphasize the ethical and practical issues in practicing law in a small firm, managing law firm finances, basic accounting systems for firm finances and client trust accounts, methods for marketing a practice, attracting clients and managing client relationships, working with people that the students will encounter in the practice of law, and the systems and technologies used in the practice of law. Method of Evaluation: Students will be evaluated on their ability to take the principles discussed and apply those principles by creating a business plan for opening a law firm, or for those planning on joining an existing firm a plan for development of their participation in the firm. Seventy-five percent (75%) of the grade will be based on the business plan or personal development plan to be submitted at the end of the course. Students will present the business plan or personal development plan in lieu of a final examination. Twenty-five percent (25%) of the grade will be based on class preparation and participation. Class participation will include class discussion and participation in exercises in which students will apply the materials from the class to situations a new attorney might encounter in practice.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 5:25 - 8:10pm270
CLI9302.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=271CLI9302.AEnvironmental and Natural Resources Law ClinicRuley,DougCredit Hours: 6, 9 or 13 The Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic functions as a public interest environmental law firm with a collegial atmosphere that encourages interaction and feedback among students and Clinic faculty. Under the supervision of experienced environmental attorneys, student clinicians represent community groups and conservation organizations in real-world cases and projects. Although the clinic experience varies from student to student depending on the cases and projects assigned, student clinicians typically learn how to: communicate with clients, experts, agency personnel, opposing parties, and the media; conduct site visits; investigate scientific, technical, and other factual information; gather public records using FOIA and state public record laws; engage in specialized legal research; draft and file court briefs and pleadings in compliance with local rules; conduct written and oral discovery; analyze complex legal and factual materials; develop legal theories, claims, and arguments; engage in strategic decision-making; negotiate with opposing parties and craft settlement agreements; and comply with ethical and professional standards. The goal of the clinical experience is to develop well-rounded professionals with a high degree of skill and judgment grounded in service to clients and respect for the environment and the rule of law. While learning the craft of lawyering, students are expected to give careful attention to the ethical aspects of practicing law, and to evaluate alternative approaches to resolving environmental conflicts. Practicum, Classroom Component, and Clinic Hours: Required classes two days/week-one hour fifteen minutes each class. A student's schedule for the student's other clinic hours will be determined by the individual student in consultation with clinical faculty. Students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the required two/days a week ENRLC classes. Legal Profession is strongly recommended for students enrolling in any clinic term. In addition, during the selection process, priority will generally be given to students who have successfully completed Administrative Law and Environmental Law (or another substantive environmental law course). Registration: The ENRLC conducts interviews with interested applicants in the spring for the Fall Semester and in the fall for the Spring Semester. The ENRLC will also have a separate interview process for the summer. If a student is selected for the ENRLC by clinical faculty, the ENRLC will provide the Registrar's Office with a list of all accepted applicants and will register them for the course. Because of the full-time nature of this program, 13-credit students may not register for another course in the semester they take the ENRLC without the express consent of the Director of the Clinic. GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 2:10 - 3:25pm271
CLI9310.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=274CLI9310.ASouth Royalton Legal Clinic - Full-timeMay,JamesStudents work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel. Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners. Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship. Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and investigate cases, draft pleadings and memoranda, participate in negotiations, and conduct evidentiary and appellate hearings, all under the supervision of one of the Clinic's attorneys. Participation in the Clinic can be counted toward completion of Vermont's three-month clerkship requirement. It is recommended that students take Evidence and/or Trial Practice prior to enrolling in the Clinic, but neither is required. *Classroom component: Spring 2015 -- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks: 8:30 - 9:45 AM or 2:10 - 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks. Registration: You may register on-line for the SRLC as you do for any other VLS course. Assessment of students' performance in the classroom portion and representation of clients will be made by the Clinic faculty on a pass/fail basis ("pass with honors" and "low pass" are other possible designations). NOTE: Part-time and full-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the Clinic's introductory session; they should also realize that occasional conflicts may arise between court hearings (and similar commitments) and daytime classes, in which case client obligations prevail. Satisfies skills requirement. GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b274
CLI9312.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=275CLI9312.ASouth Royalton Legal Clinic - Part-timeMay,JamesStudents work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel. Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners. Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship. Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and investigate cases, draft pleadings and memoranda, participate in negotiations, and conduct evidentiary and appellate hearings, all under the supervision of one of the Clinic's attorneys. Participation in the Clinic can be counted toward completion of Vermont's three-month clerkship requirement. It is recommended that students take Evidence and/or Trial Practice prior to enrolling in the Clinic, but neither is required. *Classroom component: Spring 2015 -- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks: 8:30 - 9:45 AM or 2:10 - 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks. Registration: You may register on-line for the SRLC as you do for any other VLS course. Assessment of students' performance in the classroom portion and representation of clients will be made by the Clinic faculty on a pass/fail basis ("pass with honors" and "low pass" are other possible designations). NOTE: Part-time and full-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the Clinic's introductory session; they should also realize that occasional conflicts may arise between court hearings (and similar commitments) and daytime classes, in which case client obligations prevail. Satisfies skills requirement. GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b275
CLI9315.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=276CLI9315.ASouth Royalton Legal Clinic - ClassMay,JamesStudents work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel. Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners. Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship. Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and investigate cases, draft pleadings and memoranda, participate in negotiations, and conduct evidentiary and appellate hearings, all under the supervision of one of the Clinic's attorneys. Participation in the Clinic can be counted toward completion of Vermont's three-month clerkship requirement. It is recommended that students take Evidence and/or Trial Practice prior to enrolling in the Clinic, but neither is required. *Classroom component: Spring 2015 -- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks: 8:30 - 9:45 AM or 2:10 - 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks. Registration: You may register on-line for the SRLC as you do for any other VLS course. Assessment of students' performance in the classroom portion and representation of clients will be made by the Clinic faculty on a pass/fail basis ("pass with honors" and "low pass" are other possible designations). NOTE: Part-time and full-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the Clinic's introductory session; they should also realize that occasional conflicts may arise between court hearings (and similar commitments) and daytime classes, in which case client obligations prevail. Satisfies skills requirement. GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMTWRF 9:55 - 11:10am276
CLI9315.Bhttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=277CLI9315.BSouth Royalton Legal Clinic - ClassMay,JamesStudents work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel. Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners. Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship. Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and investigate cases, draft pleadings and memoranda, participate in negotiations, and conduct evidentiary and appellate hearings, all under the supervision of one of the Clinic's attorneys. Participation in the Clinic can be counted toward completion of Vermont's three-month clerkship requirement. It is recommended that students take Evidence and/or Trial Practice prior to enrolling in the Clinic, but neither is required. *Classroom component: Spring 2015 -- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks: 8:30 - 9:45 AM or 2:10 - 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks. Registration: You may register on-line for the SRLC as you do for any other VLS course. Assessment of students' performance in the classroom portion and representation of clients will be made by the Clinic faculty on a pass/fail basis ("pass with honors" and "low pass" are other possible designations). NOTE: Part-time and full-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the Clinic's introductory session; they should also realize that occasional conflicts may arise between court hearings (and similar commitments) and daytime classes, in which case client obligations prevail. Satisfies skills requirement. GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMTWRF 2:10 - 3:25pm277
CLI9326.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=272CLI9326.AAdvanced ENRLCRuley,Doug6.00000000000000GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b272
CLI9329.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=273CLI9329.AAdvanced ENRLCRuley,Doug9.00000000000000GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b273
CLI9333.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=278CLI9333.AAdvanced SRLCMay,JamesStudents will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director. Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.13.0000000000000GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b278
CLI9336.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=279CLI9336.AAdvanced SRLCMay,JamesStudents will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director. Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.6.00000000000000GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b279
CLI9339.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=280CLI9339.AAdvanced SRLCMay,JamesStudents will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director. Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.9.00000000000000GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b280
CLI9405.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=281CLI9405.ADispute Resolution Clinic IBarone,RobinThis clinical offering trains students to mediate. While training, students observe and will later conduct mediations in various Vermont and New Hampshire courts. The course begins with an intensive skills session in the form of a day-long training session scheduled for Monday, January 6th before the start of spring classes. Attendance at this session is MANDATORY. Students interested in taking the course MUST attend the Friday session. No exceptions can be made. There will also be one Saturday training session, presently scheduled for January 25th. This session is also mandatory. Weekly seminars will focus on course readings regarding conflict theory, mediation techniques, litigation strategies, public policy and social justice issues, as well as ethical and licensing concerns. A portion of each class will be devoted to clinic-style rounds, enabling students to present the cases they have observed or mediated for discussion and feedback. Students will be asked to analyze mediation practice and conflict theory from the various perspectives of mediator, attorney advocate, parties and client. Professor Barone administers small claims mediation programs in two New Hampshire courts (Lebanon District Court and Haverhill District Court): students will be able to observe and later mediate in those courts. Vermont small claims court mediation programs are currently suspended for budgetary reasons.) Professor Barone will also arrange shadowing opportunities with practicing Vermont attorney-mediators, so that the students can observe civil mediations at the Superior Court level. Students will need to provide their own transportation to and from the various courts throughout Vermont, and/or to Lebanon NH and North Haverhill NH. Satisfies skills requirement. GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 8:30 - 10:10am281
CLI9411.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=282CLI9411.ASemester in Practice - PracticumCimini,ChristineThe Semester in Practice Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice. The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Field-mentors are experienced lawyers who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms. The SiP provides an opportunity - through observation, participation, practice, and reflection - to improve students' legal knowledge and skills and to inform and expand their vision of what the practice and profession of law can be. Components and Requirements of the SiP Course: There are two different components to the SiP program: a practicum component and a classroom component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site field mentor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. All students are required to participate in a five-day on-line orientation prior to the first day of work on-site. Credits and Grading: students enrolled in the full time program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits. Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded. Eligibility: 1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. 2. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials. (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). Application Deadlines: 1. In order to participate in a Fall SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st. 2. In order to participate in a Spring SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th. Satisfies the skills requirement.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b282
CLI9412.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=283CLI9412.ASemester in Practice - ClassWhite,JeffryThe Semester in Practice Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice. The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Field-mentors are experienced lawyers who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms. The SiP provides an opportunity - through observation, participation, practice, and reflection - to improve students' legal knowledge and skills and to inform and expand their vision of what the practice and profession of law can be. Components and Requirements of the SiP Course: There are two different components to the SiP program: a practicum component and a classroom component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site field mentor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. All students are required to participate in a five-day on-line orientation prior to the first day of work on-site. Credits and Grading: students enrolled in the full time program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits. Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded. Eligibility: 1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. 2. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials. (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). Application Deadlines: 1. In order to participate in a Fall SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st. 2. In order to participate in a Spring SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th. Satisfies the skills requirement.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b283
CLI9425.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=284CLI9425.AJD Externship - Part-timeCimini,ChristineThe Part-Time JD Externship Program is a field-based externship in which student's apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice. The part-time externship program is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Field-mentors are experienced lawyers who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms. The Part-Time Externship provides students an opportunity to participate in a range of lawyering tasks so that they develop an improved understanding of the legal process and of legal problems at all stages of resolution. Components and Requirements of the Part-Time JD Externship Course: There are two different components to the Part-Time JD Externship program: a practicum component and an academic component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site field mentor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. The Externship faculty has the option on a semester by semester basis of doing either individual conference sessions or regular classroom sessions. A mandatory seminar component is included with pass/fail evaluation and there is no additional credit for the seminar. All students are required to participate in an orientation during the first week of the externship semester. Credits and Grading: students enrolled in the part-time program must work three hours a week for 15 weeks for each credit earned. For example, a six credit externship requires 2.4 days or 18 hours of work per week. Students may earn from two to six credits depending on the time committed. Students take classes on-campus during the semester in addition to participating in a JD externship. Eligibility: 1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. 2. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials. (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). Application Deadlines: 1. In order to participate in a Fall Part-Time JD Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by April 15th. 2. In order to participate in a Spring Part-Time JD Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th. Satisfies the skills requirement.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 5:30 - 6:30pmWhite,Jeffry284
CLI9428.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=286CLI9428.AFood and Agriculture ClinicRenner,JamieIn the Food and Agriculture Clinic, students collaborate with strategic partner organizations to create and disseminate innovative and practical legal resources, including guides, toolkits, templates, websites, infographics and white papers. These resources will support (1) targeted constituencies engaged in sustainable food and agriculture (farmers, food producers, food entrepreneurs, consumers, legislators and advocates) and (2) the expansion of sustainable food and agriculture markets. Students participate in all aspects of project development, identifying and pursuing potential projects and partners, grant-writing, executing projects, and marketing and disseminating their information products through partners, networks and the creative use of social media. The clinic is entrepreneurial, always seeking new ways to innovate and support innovation in the evolving agricultural economy. Students will also provide public comments on proposed regulations and participate in relevant state or federal task forces.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b286
CLI9430.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=287CLI9430.AJudicial Externship - Full-timeCimini,ChristineThe Judicial Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) in judicial chambers. The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial clerk. The Judicial Externship will provide students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system. The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develop writing, research and analytical skills. Components and Requirements of the Judicial Externship: There are two different components to the Judicial Externship: a practicum component and a classroom component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site judicial supervisor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. All students are required to participate in a one-day orientation at VLS prior to the first day of work on-site. Credits and Grading: students enrolled in the judicial externship program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits. Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded. Eligibility: 1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. 2. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials. (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). Application Deadlines: 1. In order to participate in a Fall Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st. 2. In order to participate in a Spring Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th. Satisfies the skills requirement.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b287
CLI9431.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=288CLI9431.AJudicial Externship - ClassWhite,JeffryThe Judicial Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) in judicial chambers. The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial clerk. The Judicial Externship will provide students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system. The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develop writing, research and analytical skills. Components and Requirements of the Judicial Externship: There are two different components to the Judicial Externship: a practicum component and a classroom component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site judicial supervisor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. All students are required to participate in a one-day orientation at VLS prior to the first day of work on-site. Credits and Grading: students enrolled in the judicial externship program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits. Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded. Eligibility: 1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. 2. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials. (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). Application Deadlines: 1. In order to participate in a Fall Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st. 2. In order to participate in a Spring Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th. Satisfies the skills requirement.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b288
CLI9432.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=290CLI9432.ALLM ExternshipLLM Externships are designed to allow LLM candidates the opportunity to engage in one-on-one or small group learning in a practical setting such as a governmental agency, law firm, corporation, or non-profit organization. These externships provide students an opportunity to gain familiarity with lawyering skills, including written and oral communication; problem solving; trial preparation; drafting documents, proposed legislation, proposed regulations, and pleadings; interviewing, counseling and negotiation; and other legal skills. The student must find a faculty sponsor and prepare a written contract with the sponsoring organization that carefully defines the learning experience. The contract must be signed by the student, the faculty member, and the supervisor at the sponsoring organization. Journals and the evaluation of the on-site supervisor will be used to evaluate the student. The LLM. Externship program is open to LLM students only. The MELP/LLM Externship Handbook is available at http://vermontlaw.edu/Documents/9_14_09%20MELP%20LLM%20Intern%20Handbook.pdf. NOTE: LLM students who seek a part-time Externship with the Conservation Law Foundation should contact Professor White.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b290
CLI9437.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=285CLI9437.AAdvanced Energy ClinicJones,KevinGP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b285
CLI9440.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=291CLI9440.AMaster's ExternshipMaster of Environmental Law and Policy Externships are designed to give students first-hand field experience in the environmental area. Prior students' work has included counseling, drafting regulations and legislation, developing environmental handbooks, preparing legal memoranda, drafting or commenting on environmental plans, preparing environmental impact statements, and analyzing environmental issues from a legal and/or scientific perspective. The best experiences integrate legal, scientific, policy, and ethical issues. Non-profit groups; international, federal, state and local government agencies; law firms, and consulting firms are among the many organizations from all over the world to sponsor MELP externships. The student must find a faculty sponsor and prepare a written contract with the sponsoring organization that carefully defines the learning experience. The contract must be signed by the student, the faculty member, and the supervisor at the sponsoring organization. Journals and the evaluation of the on-site supervisor will be used to evaluate the student. The MELP Externship program is open to MELP and to joint degree students for MELP credit only. The MELP/LLM Internship Handbook is available at: http://vermontlaw.edu/Documents/9_14_09%20MELP%20LLM%20Intern%20Handbook.pdf. GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b291
CLI9450.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=289CLI9450.ALand Use ClinicGjessing,CatherineLand Use Regulation or Land and Takings6.00000000000000The Land Use Clinic is a six-credit course that combines a two-credit classroom component with a four-credit placement experience. The classroom component of the course introduces students to the policies and procedures underlying Vermont’s Environmental Court, to substantive issues that commonly arise in land use practice, and to the competencies that lawyers need for effective representation in this area of law. This land use clinic complements the environmental law program at VLS by providing students the opportunity to understand how land use laws are developed, implemented and enforced, and the role lawyers play in that process. The four credit placement component of the course requires thirteen weeks at fourteen hours per week, or two days per week, at the placement. The two-credit classroom component of the course requires fourteen weeks of class at two hours per class, though some of the classes may be frontloaded. Prerequisites: Land Use Regulation or Land and Takings. Grading: Students will receive a letter grade for the classroom component and high pass/pass/low pass/fail for the placement component of the course. Enrollment limit: 6 students. Satisfies the skills requirement.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 5:25 - 7:25pm289
CRI7307.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=292CRI7307.ACriminal Practice and ProcedureSaxman,AnnaThe course will focus on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and the 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Students will examine the constitutional principles of criminal procedure and how those principles are actually utilized in practice. This course will give students the basic understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional criminal law and procedure while at the same time learning the practical application of theory to practice. The course curriculum will focus attention on: bail, search and seizure, the right against self-incrimination and involuntary confessions, discovery, Double Jeopardy, Confrontation Clause, the right to effective assistance of counsel, judgment of acquittal motions, jury instructions and sentencing. Students will have the opportunity to draft and argue motions in criminal pre-trial and trial litigation. This course is a blend of the practical and theoretical, and students can expect to leave this class knowing how to analyze factual scenarios using constitutional criminal law cases and the Rules. Students will be expected to argue motions in front of the class as well as serve as judge's ruling on the motions made in class. Students will have the opportunity to improve their legal analysis, writing and oral argument skills.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 5:25 - 7:10pm292
CRI7313.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=293CRI7313.ACapital Punishment SeminarMeyer,PhilipThis seminar examines capital punishment as a legal process, using interdisciplinary materials and theory, litigation documents including briefs and recordings of oral arguments, and appellate opinions. The seminar also employs written narratives, movies, and popular cultural images and artifacts to explore this subject matter. Diverse topics in the course may include: analyzing legal arguments for and against the death penalty (whether capital punishment does or does not violate the constitution); the court's ongoing attempts to articulate meaningful standards for deciding who deserves to die; the sociology of death row confinement; the methods of capital punishment (electrocution, lethal injection, etc.); the impact of capital punishment upon various actors (guards, judges, families of the executed, etc.); moral arguments for and against the death penalty; issues of age, race and gender and the death penalty; terrorism and the death penalty; theories of punishment and the death penalty; and the history of capital punishment in America. Satisfies perspective requirement. *Method of evaluation is based upon class participation and submission of a final paper. *The paper may satisfy the AWR requirement, with permission of the instructor. (The AWR paper is a longer research project and has different requirements.)GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 3:35 - 5:15pm293
CRI7350.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=294CRI7350.ACriminal Law ClinicSaxman,Anna6.00000000000000This course gives students the opportunity to experience criminal practice in either prosecution or defense settings under the close supervision of our distinguished practitioner-faculty members. Students will be placed in the prosecution, defense or appellate defense practice settings, and will receive classroom instruction once per week for two hours covering foundational aspects of Vermont criminal. Students will then apply classroom concepts in real criminal cases, working under close supervision of the classroom faculty, Anna Saxman (Vermont Deputy Defender General) David Cahill (Deputy State's Attorney, WRJ) and Brian Marsicovetere (Marsicovetere Law Group, PC) contracted to provide public defender services in Windsor County). This is a 6 credit course: 2 credit hours of classroom - once a week for 2 hours; and 4 credit hours of clinic work - twice a week, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, for a total of 13 hours. The course will be graded High Pass/Pass/Low Pass/Fail. Enrollment is limited to 6 students. This course satisfies the skills requirement Placements will be distributed as follows: Windsor County State's Attorney's Office (2 students) Students will co-prosecute DUI and other misdemeanor cases. Motions will be filed in court to admit students under the student practice rule. Practical experience will include taking depositions, responding to, drafting, and arguing motions, examining and cross examining witnesses and participating in jury selection and trial. Vermont Office of Defender General/ Appellate Defense (2 students) Students will be assigned 1 to 2 cases per semester. They will read the record, analyze the facts and the law, research, draft, and ultimately write the appellate brief in the case. The students may return to argue their cases before the Vermont Supreme Court the following semester under the student practice rules. Marsicovetere Law Group, PC/ Public Defender (2 students) Students in the clinic will be assigned specific misdemeanor cases and will be closely supervised throughout the process of each case, arraignment through disposition. Students will experience the discovery process, research and draft applicable motions to suppress, dismiss, or compel further discovery, and, depending on the complexity of the motion, take part in the hearing accompanied by a supervising attorney. If applicable, they will work on settlement negotiations with the state. If the case proceeds on a trial track, then they will work with the supervising attorney in all aspects of trial preparation. 6.00000000000000GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 5:25 - 7:25pm294
DIV7615.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=295DIV7615.ASexual Orientation and the LawJohnson,GregoryIn 1960 all fifty states had sodomy laws. The mere imputation of homosexuality ruined careers and was considered so damaging that it was defamation per se. Today, same-sex couples can marry in eighteen states (and D.C.) and can obtain a civil union or domestic partnership in another seven states. Almost half the states, and most major municipalities, protect gay men and lesbians (and transgendered people, in a growing number of those states) from employment and housing discrimination. What accounts for this extraordinary change in society's attitude toward homosexuality and gender identity? We will ponder this question as we explore the historical and contemporary relationship between sexual identity and the law. Topics covered include LGBT youth issues, college life, workplace discrimination, the military, and family law. Much of the legal doctrine considered in the course is constitutional, including in-depth studies of the right to privacy, the First Amendment, and equal protection. Throughout the semester we will also ask whether something has been lost in the meteoric rise of LGBT civil rights. In the drive for equality, has the LGBT community subverted the dominant paradigm or been co-opted by it--can a gay pride parade exist without corporate sponsorship? In this context we will offer a queer theory critique of the mainstream LGBT movement. Join us to study and debate on one of the most compelling civil rights issues of our time. Method of evaluation: Class participation and term paper. AWR: Yes. GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 3:35 - 5:15pm295
DIV7620.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=296DIV7620.ANative Americans and the LawHoffmann,HillaryThis course will focus on the constitutional, statutory and jurisprudential rules that make up the field of Federal Indian Law. Attention will be given to the historical framework from which the rules were derived. After tracing the development of the underlying legal doctrines which are prominent today, we will consider subject-specific areas of Indian Law like hunting and fishing rights, stewardship of natural resources, economic development and protection of religion and cultural lifestyles. Method of evaluation: A final presentation, a final exam, and/or a final paper. AWR: No.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 12:45 - 2pm296
ENV5105.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=297ENV5105.AAdministrative LawWest,JessicaAdministrative law extends into nearly every aspect of modern life, guiding the regulation of labor, immigration, the environment, health and safety, national security initiatives, financial markets, taxation, and prisons. This course will provide an overview of the modern administrative system including the constitutional limitations on agency authority and organizational structure, the normative and policy implications of the design of administrative institutions and programs, the investigative, adjudicatory and rulemaking powers of administrative agencies, the relationship of administrative agencies to other branches of government, and the right and scope of judicial review of agency actions.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bWF 12:45 - 2pm297
ENV5112.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=298ENV5112.AScience for Environmental LawPease,CraigThis class: (1) Broadly surveys the science most relevant to environmental law, including i) climate science, ii) air pollution including both atmospheric chemistry and health impacts, iii) toxicology of pesticides, food additives and industrial chemicals, iv) forest and endangered species management, and v) human population and resource use. (2) Discusses how scientific thinking and culture differs from legal thinking and culture. Thus, the course goes beyond summarizing what science currently knows, also asking why science knows what it does, how scientists gather data and draw inferences, and how scientists themselves evaluate the reliability of scientific information. (3) Explores some of the key challenges in effectively using science in legal and policy decision making. The course will develop several different perspectives on this, including i) looking in detail at the science underlying particular legal cases, ii) looking at the challenges inherent in translating science into regulatory standards, and iii) examining the roles of major scientific institutions in supplying advice and analysis to policymakers. Broadly, the student will develop an understanding of the interface of science, law and policy, through the study of several specific case studies. Method of evaluation: Mid-term exam and paper (2000 words) AWR: Yes.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 9:55 - 11:10am298
ENV5115.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=299ENV5115.AEnvironmental LawRuley,DougThis course will combine a practical approach to environmental law and advocacy, grounded in recent cases, with a functional overview of American environmental statutes, regulations, and common law. The primary statutes covered with include pollution control laws (the Clean Water Act, the Clean Air Act, etc.), the ESA and MMPA, information-based laws (primarily NEPA) and land and resource management laws (NFMA, FLPMA, Magnusson-Stevens). The course will include occasional forays into relevant sciences and the interaction between science and environmental law. The goals of this course are a working familiarity with environmental law, a base for applying this law in environmental practice, and preparation for further studies in environmental law. Method of evaluation: Take-home exam.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMR 11:20 - 12:35pm299
ENV5122.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=300ENV5122.ACommunications, Advocacy and LeadershipCarter,JaredA successful environmental professional need to possess the ability to advocate, counsel, investigate, persuade, research, and educate. This course will develop those skills through various writing and oral advocacy projects. In addition to more discrete research and writing projects, students will practice drafting legislation, compose a Freedom of Information Act request, draft a public comment letter, write a grant proposal letter of inquiry, and create an environmental communication campaign. Different skills are emphasized through the exploration of these diverse types of writing. The class will focus extensively on the craft of writing well and communicating to different types of audiences.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bWF 11:20 - 12:35pm300
ENV5205.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=301ENV5205.AAir PollutionScott, Jessica<div></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 12:45 - 2pm301
ENV5220.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=302ENV5220.AEnvironmental Economics and MarketJones,KevinSummary: The course introduces students to the discipline of environmental economics and exposes them to debates over the use of market-based instruments in environmental, energy, and climate policy. It also introduces students to basic economics and finance concepts, examines key principles about market behavior and efficiency, and applies these basic elements and concepts to common environmental problems and actual case studies. Grading and Assignments: The course is worth three credits. Students will be assessed according to the following two criteria: Class participation: 30% and various exams: 70%GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 8:30 - 9:45am302
ENV5228.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=303ENV5228.AEnergy Regulation and the EnvironmentJones,KevinEnergy Law and Policy, an Energy course in the summer or Instructor's Permission.This course builds on the fall course Energy Law and Policy in a Carbon-Constrained World. The course exposes students to the legal, economic, and structural issues involved in both energy regulation and energy markets, focusing on electricity. The course examines the evolution, theory and techniques of the monopoly regulation. Students learn how utilities are regulated. We examine rate setting, rate design and regulatory alternatives to traditional rates such as performance-based rates. The course then examines evolving competitive, market-based alternatives. The course exposes students to the latest approaches to managing the electric grid, to renewable energy strategies and procurement, energy efficiency, demand side management and green markets. Prerequisites: Energy Law and Policy, an Energy course in the summer or Instructor's Permission.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 2:10 - 3:25pm303
ENV5235.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=304ENV5235.ANatural Resources LawHoffmann,HillaryThis course provides a survey introduction to federal natural resources law. In a lecture and problem-based format, we will examine the theoretical conflicts that underlie various approaches to resource management, as well as the special qualities of natural resource problems that render management efforts so difficult. Topics may include the legal treatment of wildlife and biodiversity, living marine resources, water, forests, protected public lands, and cultural resource preservation. Method of evaluation: Final exam.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 11:20 - 12:35pm304
ENV5239.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=305ENV5239.ALand TransactionsMayhew,RandallLawyers and land use professionals, whether representing land owners, developers, regulators, development opponents, or land conservation organizations, need to understand the same basics of land transactions, development and finance. The course examines how land is transferred, including an introduction to the title system, title insurance, purchase contracts and deeds. The course also provides an introduction to the private development process and exposes students to modern real estate financing and investment decision-making. Course participants will engage in the negotiation and drafting of a commercial purchase agreement. Method of evaluation: Take-home exam and class participation. GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 2:10 - 3:25pm305
ENV5246.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=306ENV5246.AWater QualityParenteau,PatThis course takes an in-depth look at the Clean Water Act and related statutes such as the Safe Drinking Water Act, The Marine Protection, Research, and Sanctuaries Act ("Ocean Dumping Act") and the Coastal Zone Management Act. Common law remedies are also considered. Guest speakers will provide additional perspectives. Method of Evaluation: One commentary (1000 words) and take-home final take home. AWR: No.GP0|#30f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c;L0|#030f7956a-fea3-4aca-a075-7f2e54a28a3c|2015 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 8:30 - 9:45am306