ADR6405.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=173ADR6405.AArbitrationMcCormack,BethThis course is designed to familiarize students with the legal issues surrounding the arbitration process. Arbitration is an efficient, expeditious, and (sometimes) lower-cost alternative to litigation that is growing in popularity. Many areas of law commonly use arbitration, including securities regulation, commercial law, employment law, medical malpractice, and construction law. This course examines the nature of the arbitration process, rules governing hearings, and the relationship between arbitration and the court system. Students will study issues surrounding the enforceability of agreements to arbitrate, defenses to arbitration clauses, and judicial review of an arbitration award. Students will also learn how to read and draft arbitration provisions. This class will provide students with a thorough understanding of arbitration law and a solid foundation for legal practice, whether in alternative dispute resolution tribunals or in the civil justice system. Method of evaluation: class participation, occasional in-class exercises, and a take-home final examination. Satisfies skills requirement. The class will not include a component that satisfies the AWR requirement.GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 3:35 - 5:15pm173
ADR6415.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=174ADR6415.AEnvironmental Dispute ResolutionNolon,SeanResolving environmental disputes is notoriously difficult. These conflicts involve multiple parties, complicated factual matters and typically resist simple solutions. In this course, students will explore these characteristics, investigate the full range of processes available to manage environmental disputes and assesses relevant policy and practical considerations of process selection. Over the course of the semester, we will compare the use of adversarial and collaborative processes in environmental disputes and explore the advantages and disadvantages of different approaches. We will rely heavily on simulations to explore theories and build the skills needed to be effective environmental negotiators. Through this course you will develop an understanding of how to create an effective problem-solving climate that will meet your client's needs. ATTENDING THE FIRST CLASS IS MANDATORY. Environmental Law and Administrative Law are strongly recommended, but not required. Method of Evaluation: Performance in simulations, participation in Class and a final exam (Does not satisfy AWR) Satisfies skills requirement. JD/MELP: Alternative Dispute Resolution This is a limited enrollment course (24)GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bT 3:35 - 6:15pm174
ADR6420.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=175ADR6420.ANegotiationNolon,SeanThis course is designed to help you explore what it means to be an effective negotiator and to practice the skills needed to improve on this important life skill. You will be expected to learn and apply theories from a broad range of disciplines including law, economics, psychology, sociology and management. These theories will be discussed and debated in class discussions and practice through highly interactive simulations. The course examines the dynamics, constraints, and skills needed to be an effective negotiator. It focuses equally on the use of negotiation in deal making and to resolve disputes. We will conduct simulations in a variety of contexts including face-to-face, over the phone and email. We will explore how dynamics change when moving from two-party to multi-party negotiations and look at how ethics should influence our behavior. Readings will need to be completed ahead of time and a final project will be completed after classes. Satisfies skills requirement. JD/MELP: Alternative Dispute Resolution. Method of Evaluation: Performance in simulations, participation in class and a final negotiation (Does not satisfy AWR) This is a limited enrollment course (24) GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bS 8 - 6:30pm, F 2:10 - 6:30pm175
BUS6235.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=176BUS6235.ACorporationsGoodenough,OliverThis course will prepare you to understand and provide advice on the principal organizational forms used to structure businesses in the United States. These forms include corporations, limited liability companies, limited partnerships, general partnerships and sole proprietorships. We will also examine the law of agency. Course coverage includes an introduction to securities regulation through the lens of insider trading. Method of evaluation: Final examGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 3:35 - 5:15pm176
BUS6285.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=177BUS6285.ASecured TransactionsVogel,JoanThis course is an examination of the structure of the law of security interests in personal property from both practical and economic perspectives. It examines the interests of all parties in secured transactions, particularly as a way of financing business. The focus of the course is on statutory analysis and problem-solving. Method of evaluation: Final examGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 11:20 - 12:35pm177
BUS6305.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=178BUS6305.ANon Profit OrganizationsSchmidt,BetsyThe Life Cycle of a 501(c)(3) Public Charity: Management and Legal Issues Students will create, fund, run, and dissolve a virtual §501(c)(3) public charity over the course of the semester, as we learn the opportunities and challenges that nonprofits can face. Section 501(c)(3)s can include soup kitchens, museums, private schools, legal aid centers, private hospitals, environmental organizations, and countless other types of educational, religious, scientific, and charitable organizations. We will discuss the theory behind nonprofit law and tax exemption, starting and dissolving nonprofit corporations at the state level, obtaining tax exempt status from the IRS, the charitable contribution deduction, fiduciary duties of the board of directors, legal rules surrounding lobbying and political activity of nonprofits, charitable solicitation laws, unrelated business income tax, private inurement, and excess benefit taxes. This is a hybrid distance learning course that links VLS students with Public Policy, Business and Interdisciplinary Studies students from George Mason University. I meet 3 times in person with you. The rest of the sessions will either be via videoconference from Oakes 208 or on your computer. Tuesdays, 3:35-6:05. GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bT 3:35 - 6:05pm178
BUS6361.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=179BUS6361.AeLawyering: eDiscovery and Big DataEicks,JeanneThis course will prepare you for the modern practice of law, and teach the skills necessary to request, produce and manage documents in this age of electronically stored information. 95% of cases never go to trial; they are litigated to conclusion through pre-trial strategy and discovery. Discovery today is largely (estimates around 85%) based on discovering ESI. Students who have taken this course will have skills that offer added value to hiring firms. eDiscovery is now a multi-billion dollar industry, which can be a source of good jobs for graduates educated in the area. The concepts and skills taught in this course have little overlap with other courses. The following objectives will be addressed in this course - all of which offer opportunities to analyze the impacts of technology on law: Understand ESI representation of clients in transactional law and litigation. Explore the jurisprudential impacts of technology on how we conceive of and apply law. Demonstrate an understanding of the application of legal ethics in the area of ESI. Explain the technical and practical problems presented to clients and counsel as they prepare for and respond to eDiscovery requests. Describe the features of an eDiscovery plan and the considerations involved in creating one. Explain the importance and the steps that maybe taken to maintain computer and network security and avoid spoliation. Explain methods by which parties learn about the opposing party's technical infrastructure and ESI. Discuss difficulties which spring from the inability of counsel and client to reach agreement regarding ESI Demonstrated knowledge of the FRCP and the Rules of Evidence as they relate to ESI. Method of evaluation: Three projects and a hands-on component. AWR yes.GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 12:45 - 2pmGoodenough,Oliver179
CLI9302.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=180CLI9302.AEnvironmental and Natural Resources Law ClinicRuley,Doug(6, 9 or 13 credits) The Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic is a public interest environmental law firm with a collegial atmosphere that encourages interaction and feedback among students and Clinic faculty. Under the supervision of experienced environmental attorneys, student clinicians represent community groups and conservation organizations in real-world cases and projects. Although the clinic experience varies from student to student depending on the cases and projects assigned, student clinicians typically learn how to: communicate with clients, experts, agency personnel, opposing parties, and the media; conduct site visits; investigate scientific, technical, and other factual information; gather public records using FOIA and state public record laws; engage in specialized legal research; draft and file court briefs and pleadings in compliance with local rules; conduct written and oral discovery; analyze complex legal and factual materials; develop legal theories, claims, and arguments; engage in strategic decision-making; negotiate with opposing parties and craft settlement agreements; and comply with ethical and professional standards. The goal of the clinical experience is to develop well-rounded professionals with a high degree of skill and judgment grounded in service to clients and respect for the environment and the rule of law. While learning the craft of lawyering, students are expected to give careful attention to the ethical aspects of practicing law, and to evaluate alternative approaches to resolving environmental conflicts. Practicum, Classroom Component and Clinic Hours: Required classes two days/week—one hour fifteen minutes each class. A student’s schedule for the student’s other clinic hours will be determined by the individual student in consultation with clinical faculty. Legal Profession is strongly recommended for students enrolling in any clinic term. In addition, during the selection process, priority will be given to students who have successfully completed Administrative Law and Environmental Law (or another substantive environmental law course). Registration: The ENRLC conducts interviews with interested applicants in the spring for the Fall Semester and in the fall for the Spring Semester. The ENRLC will also have a separate interview process for the summer. If a student is selected for the ENRLC by clinical faculty, the ENRLC will provide the Registrar’s Office with a list of all accepted applicants and will register them for the course. Because of the full-time nature of this program, 13-credit students may not register for another course in the semester they take the ENRLC without the express consent of the Director of the Clinic. Part-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the required two/days a week ENRLC classes. 6.00000000000000GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 2:10 - 3:25pm180
CLI9310.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=184CLI9310.ASouth Royalton Legal Clinic - Full-timeMay,JamesStudents work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel. Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners. Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship. Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and investigate cases, draft pleadings and memoranda, participate in negotiations, and conduct evidentiary and appellate hearings, all under the supervision of one of the Clinic’s attorneys. Participation in the Clinic can be counted toward completion of Vermont’s three-month clerkship requirement. It is recommended that students take Evidence and/or Trial Practice prior to enrolling in the Clinic, but neither is required. *Classroom component: Fall 2014—two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks: 8:30 - 9:45 AM or 2:10 - 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks. Registration: You may register on-line for the SRLC as you do for any other VLS course. Assessment of students’ performance in the classroom portion and representation of clients will be made by the Clinic faculty on a pass/fail basis (“pass with honors” and “low pass” are other possible designations). NOTE: Part-time and full-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the Clinic’s introductory session; they should also realize that occasional conflicts may arise between court hearings (and similar commitments) and daytime classes, in which case client obligations prevail. Satisfies Skills requirement. GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b184
CLI9312.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=185CLI9312.ASouth Royalton Legal Clinic - Part-timeMay,JamesStudents work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel. Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners. Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship. Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and investigate cases, draft pleadings and memoranda, participate in negotiations, and conduct evidentiary and appellate hearings, all under the supervision of one of the Clinic’s attorneys. Participation in the Clinic can be counted toward completion of Vermont’s three-month clerkship requirement. It is recommended that students take Evidence and/or Trial Practice prior to enrolling in the Clinic, but neither is required. *Classroom component: Fall 2014—two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks: 8:30 - 9:45 AM or 2:10 - 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks. Registration: You may register on-line for the SRLC as you do for any other VLS course. Assessment of students’ performance in the classroom portion and representation of clients will be made by the Clinic faculty on a pass/fail basis (“pass with honors” and “low pass” are other possible designations). NOTE: Part-time and full-time students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the Clinic’s introductory session; they should also realize that occasional conflicts may arise between court hearings (and similar commitments) and daytime classes, in which case client obligations prevail. Satisfies Skills requirement.GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b185
CLI9315.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=560CLI9315.ASouth Royalton Legal Clinic ClassMay,JamesGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMTWRF 8:30 - 9:45am560
CLI9315.Bhttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=561CLI9315.BSouth Royalton Legal Clinic ClassMay,JamesGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMTWRF 2:10 - 3:25pm561
CLI9326.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=181CLI9326.AAdvanced ENRLCRuley,Doug6.00000000000000GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b181
CLI9329.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=182CLI9329.AAdvanced ENRLCRuley,Doug9.00000000000000GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b182
CLI9333.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=186CLI9333.AAdvanced SRLC - 13 creditsMay,JamesStudents will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director. Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked. 13.0000000000000GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b186
CLI9336.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=187CLI9336.AAdvanced SRLC - 6 creditsMay,JamesStudents will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director. Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.6.00000000000000GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b187
CLI9339.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=188CLI9339.AAdvanced SRLC - 9 creditsMay,JamesStudents will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director. Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.9.00000000000000GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b188
CLI9350.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=562CLI9350.ACriminal Law ClinicSaxman,AnnaGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 5:25 - 7:25pm562
CLI9411.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=189CLI9411.ASemester in Practice - PracticumCimini,ChristineThe Semester in Practice Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice. The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Field-mentors are experienced lawyers who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms. The SiP provides an opportunity - through observation, participation, practice, and reflection - to improve students' legal knowledge and skills and to inform and expand their vision of what the practice and profession of law can be. Components and Requirements of the SiP Course: There are two different components to the SiP program: a practicum component and a classroom component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site field mentor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. All students are required to participate in a five-day on-line orientation prior to the first day of work on-site. Credits and Grading: students enrolled in the full time program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits. Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded. Eligibility: 1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. 2. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials. (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). Application Deadlines: 1. In order to participate in a Fall SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st. 2. In order to participate in a Spring SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th. Satisfies the skills requirement. 11.0000000000000GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bWhite,Jeffry189
CLI9412.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=190CLI9412.ASemester in Practice - ClassCimini,ChristineThe Semester in Practice Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice. The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Field-mentors are experienced lawyers who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms. The SiP provides an opportunity - through observation, participation, practice, and reflection - to improve students' legal knowledge and skills and to inform and expand their vision of what the practice and profession of law can be. Components and Requirements of the SiP Course: There are two different components to the SiP program: a practicum component and a classroom component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site field mentor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. All students are required to participate in a five-day on-line orientation prior to the first day of work on-site. Credits and Grading: students enrolled in the full time program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits. Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded. Eligibility: 1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. 2. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials. (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). Application Deadlines: 1. In order to participate in a Fall SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st. 2. In order to participate in a Spring SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th. Satisfies the skills requirement. 2.00000000000000GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bWhite,Jeffry190
CLI9425.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=191CLI9425.AJudicial Externship - Part-timeCimini,ChristineThe Part-Time JD Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice. The part-time externship program is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Field-mentors are experienced lawyers who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms. The Part-Time Externship provides students an opportunity to participate in a range of lawyering tasks so that they develop an improved understanding of the legal process and of legal problems at all stages of resolution. Components and Requirements of the Part-Time JD Externship Course: There are two different components to the Part-Time JD Externship program: a practicum component and an academic component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site field mentor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. The Externship faculty has the option on a semester by semester basis of doing either individual conference sessions or regular classroom sessions. A mandatory seminar component is included with pass/fail evaluation and there is no additional credit for the seminar. All students are required to participate in an orientation during the first week of the externship semester. Credits and Grading: Students enrolled in the part-time program must work three hours a week for 15 weeks for each credit earned. For example, a six credit externship requires 2.4 days or 18 hours of work per week. Students may earn from two to six credits depending on the time committed. Students take classes on-campus during the semester in addition to participating in a JD externship. Eligibility: 1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. 2. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials. (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). Application Deadlines: 1. In order to participate in a Fall Part-Time JD Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by April 15th. 2. In order to participate in a Spring Part-Time JD Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th. Satisfies the skills requirement. GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 5:30 - 6:30pmWhite,Jeffry191
CLI9427.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=192CLI9427.AEnergy ClinicJones,KevinThrough this course students will be introduced to the practical aspects of real world energy projects. Students will become involved in some aspect of the development or evaluation of real life energy projects (e.g. solar PV, energy efficiency, electric vehicle infrastructure) and may have the opportunity to support the legal and policy requirements of a particular project or through the development of model legal documents to facilitate future projects. Students will be introduced to the state and federal statutes, rules, tax codes, and ordinances that apply to the development of energy projects particularly those that promote sustainability at the community level. Given the project development cycle while students may only be involved in one or more transactional elements of the project the goal of the course will be to also provide a framework for understanding how their specific component fits within the complete project cycle. Specific projects undertaken by the energy clinic will be selected in order to support some social justice or environmental benefit including community ownership, greenhouse gas reduction, or low income energy affordability goals. Classroom instruction will be through IEE faculty, fellows, and guest lecturers. GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b192
CLI9428.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=193CLI9428.AFood and Agriculture ClinicRenner,JamieIn the Food and Agriculture Clinic, students collaborate with strategic partner organizations to create and disseminate innovative and practical legal resources, including guides, toolkits, templates, websites, infographics and white papers. These resources will support (1) targeted constituencies engaged in sustainable food and agriculture (farmers, food producers, food entrepreneurs, consumers, legislators and advocates) and (2) the expansion of sustainable food and agriculture markets. Students participate in all aspects of project development, identifying and pursuing potential projects and partners, grant-writing, executing projects, and marketing and disseminating their information products through partners, networks and the creative use of social media. The clinic is entrepreneurial, always seeking new ways to innovate and support innovation in the evolving agricultural economy. Students will also provide public comments on proposed regulations and participate in relevant state or federal task forces.GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b193
CLI9429.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=563CLI9429.AFood & Ag Clinic SeminarRenner,JamieGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b563
CLI9430.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=194CLI9430.AJudicial Externship - PracticumCimini,ChristineThe Judicial Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) in judicial chambers. The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial clerk. The Judicial Externship will provide students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system. The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develop writing, research and analytical skills. Components and Requirements of the Judicial Externship: There are two different components to the Judicial Externship: a practicum component and a classroom component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site judicial supervisor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. All students are required to participate in a one-day orientation at VLS prior to the first day of work on-site. Credits and Grading: Students enrolled in the judicial externship program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits. Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded. Eligibility: Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials. (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). Application Deadlines: In order to participate in a Fall Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st. In order to participate in a Spring Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th. Satisfies the skills requirement. 11.0000000000000GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bWhite,Jeffry194
CLI9431.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=195CLI9431.AJudicial Externship - ClassCimini,ChristineThe Judicial Externship Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) in judicial chambers. The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial clerk. The Judicial Externship will provide students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system. The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develop writing, research and analytical skills. Components and Requirements of the Judicial Externship: There are two different components to the Judicial Externship: a practicum component and a classroom component. Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program. For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site judicial supervisor. For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School. All students are required to participate in a one-day orientation at VLS prior to the first day of work on-site. Credits and Grading: Students enrolled in the judicial externship program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits. Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded. Eligibility: Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials. (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). Application Deadlines: In order to participate in a Fall Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st. In order to participate in a Spring Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th. Satisfies the skills requirement. 2.00000000000000GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bWhite,Jeffry195
CLI9432.1http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=196CLI9432.1LLM ExternshipLLM Externships are designed to allow LLM candidates the opportunity to engage in one-on-one or small group learning in a practical setting such as a governmental agency, law firm, corporation, or non-profit organization. These externships provide students an opportunity to gain familiarity with lawyering skills, including written and oral communication; problem solving; trial preparation; drafting documents, proposed legislation, proposed regulations, and pleadings; interviewing, counseling and negotiation; and other legal skills. The student must find a faculty sponsor and prepare a written contract with the sponsoring organization that carefully defines the learning experience. The contract must be signed by the student, the faculty member, and the supervisor at the sponsoring organization. Journals and the evaluation of the on-site supervisor will be used to evaluate the student. The LLM. Externship program is open to LLM students only. The MELP/LLM Externship Handbook is available at http://vermontlaw.edu/Documents/9_14_09%20MELP%20LLM%20Intern%20Handbook.pdf. NOTE: LLM students who seek a part-time Externship with the Conservation Law Foundation should contact Professor White. GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b196
CLI9432.2http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=564CLI9432.2L.L.M. ExternshipLoder,ReedGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b564
CLI9440.1http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=197CLI9440.1Master's ExternshipMaster's Externships are designed to give students first-hand field experience in the environmental/energy area. Prior students' work has included counseling, drafting regulations and legislation, developing environmental handbooks, preparing legal memoranda, drafting or commenting on environmental plans, preparing environmental impact statements, and analyzing environmental issues from a legal and/or scientific perspective. The best experiences integrate legal, scientific, policy, and ethical issues. Non-profit groups; international, federal, state and local government agencies; law firms, and consulting firms are among the many organizations from all over the world to sponsor MELP externships. The student must find a faculty sponsor and prepare a written contract with the sponsoring organization that carefully defines the learning experience. The contract must be signed by the student, the faculty member, and the supervisor at the sponsoring organization. Journals and the evaluation of the on-site supervisor will be used to evaluate the student. The Master's Externship program is open to MELP/MERL and to joint degree students for Master's credit only. The Master's/LLM Exnternship Handbook is available at http://vermontlaw.edu/Documents/9_14_09%20MELP%20LLM%20Intern%20Handbook.pdf. GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b197
CLI9440.2http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=565CLI9440.2MELP ExternshipEcheverria,JohnGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b565
CLI9440.3http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=566CLI9440.3MELP ExternshipMilne,JanetGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b566
CLI9441.1http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=567CLI9441.1MELP Externship 2Cimini,ChristineGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b567
CLI9442.1http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=568CLI9442.1MERL ExternshipJones,KevinGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b568
CLI9450.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=183CLI9450.ALand Use ClinicGjessing,CatherineLand Use Regulation or Land and TakingsThe Land Use Clinic combines a two-credit classroom component with a four-credit placement experience. The classroom component of the course introduces students to the policies and procedures underlying Vermont’s Environmental Court, to substantive issues that commonly arise in land use practice, and to the competencies that lawyers need for effective representation in this area of law. This land use clinic complements the environmental law program at VLS by providing students the opportunity to understand how land use laws are developed, implemented and enforced, and the role lawyers play in that process. The four credit placement component of the course requires thirteen weeks at fourteen hours per week, or two days per week, at the placement. The two credit classroom component of the course requires fourteen weeks of class at two-hours per class, though some of the classes may be frontloaded. GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 5:25 - 7:25pm183
CRI7307.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=198CRI7307.ACriminal Practice and ProcedureSaxman,AnnaThe course will focus on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and the 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Students will examine the constitutional principles of criminal procedure and how those principles are actually utilized in practice. This course will give students the basic understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional criminal law and procedure while at the same time learning the practical application of theory to practice. The course curriculum will focus attention on: bail, search and seizure, the right against self-incrimination and involuntary confessions, discovery, Double Jeopardy, Confrontation Clause, the right to effective assistance of counsel, judgment of acquittal motions, jury instructions and sentencing. Students will have the opportunity to draft and argue motions in criminal pre-trial and trial litigation. This course is a blend of the practical and theoretical, and students can expect to leave this class knowing how to analyze factual scenarios using constitutional criminal law cases and the Rules. Students will be expected to argue motions in front of the class as well as serve as judge's ruling on the motions made in class. Students will have the opportunity to improve their legal analysis, writing and oral argument skills. GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 5:25 - 7:10pm198
CRI7307.Bhttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=569CRI7307.BCriminal Practice & ProcedureKruska,ElizabethGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 5:25 - 7:10pm569
CRI7318.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=199CRI7318.AWhite Collar CrimeTaub,JenniferWhite Collar Crime balances black letter law with current, high-profile examples of corporate felonies and fiascos. Topics include: conspiracy, mail fraud, wire fraud, securities fraud, perjury, obstruction of justice, RICO, tax fraud, money laundering, and environmental crimes. In addition, we'll cover administrative investigations, grand jury investigations, pleas, trials and sentencing. Method of evaluation: Take home exam or paper (AWR yes for paper) GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 11:20 - 12:35pm199
CRI7350.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=201CRI7350.ACriminal Law ClinicSaxman,AnnaThis course gives students the opportunity to experience criminal practice in either prosecution or defense settings under the close supervision of our distinguished practitioner-faculty members. Students will be placed in the prosecution, defense or appellate defense practice settings, and will receive classroom instruction once per week for two hours covering foundational aspects of Vermont criminal. Students will then apply classroom concepts in real criminal cases, working under close supervision of the classroom faculty, Anna Saxman (Vermont Deputy Defender General) David Cahill (Deputy State's Attorney, WRJ) and Brian Marsicovetere (Marsicovetere Law Group, PC) contracted to provide public defender services in Windsor County). This is a 6 credit course: 2 credit hours of classroom - once a week for 2 hours; and 4 credit hours of clinic work - twice a week, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, for a total of 13 hours. The course will be graded High Pass/Pass/Low Pass/Fail. Enrollment is limited to 6 students. This course satisfies the skills requirement. Placements will be distributed as follows: Windsor County State's Attorney's Office (2 students) Students will co-prosecute DUI and other misdemeanor cases. Motions will be filed in court to admit students under the student practice rule. Practical experience will include taking depositions, responding to, drafting, and arguing motions, examining and cross examining witnesses and participating in jury selection and trial. Vermont Office of Defender General/ Appellate Defense (2 students) Students will be assigned 1 to 2 cases per semester. They will read the record, analyze the facts and the law, research, draft, and ultimately write the appellate brief in the case. The students may return to argue their cases before the Vermont Supreme Court the following semester under the student practice rules. Marsicovetere Law Group, PC/ Public Defender (2 students) Students in the clinic will be assigned specific misdemeanor cases and will be closely supervised throughout the process of each case, arraignment through disposition. Students will experience the discovery process, research and draft applicable motions to suppress, dismiss, or compel further discovery, and, depending on the complexity of the motion, take part in the hearing accompanied by a supervising attorney. If applicable, they will work on settlement negotiations with the state. If the case proceeds on a trial track, then they will work with the supervising attorney in all aspects of trial preparation. 13.0000000000000GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 5:25 - 7:25pm201
DIV7610.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=202DIV7610.ARace and the Law SeminarJefferson,ShirleyThe purpose of the course is to introduce students to race as it relates to and is reflected in the law. The focus will primarily be on the role and experience of African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Latin-Americans, and Native-Americans in American society, with attention to questions concerning critical race theory, class, family, and feminism. The course will also examine the way law relates to racial diversity in the United States. Method of evaluation: Final paper AWR: yes.GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 3:35 - 5:15pm202
ENV5105.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=203ENV5105.AAdministrative LawHoffmann,HillaryAdministrative law is the law relating to administrative agencies. It includes constitutional law (especially separation of powers and procedural due process), Federal statutory law (especially the Administrative Procedure Act), and some state statutory law. Study of administrative law focuses on the activities of government agencies, from the Environmental Protection Agency to the Social Security Administration, from the Federal Trade Commission to the National Labor Relations Board. The validity of their actions depends on compliance with administrative law. Thus, lawyers for agencies, regulated industries, and public interest groups are vitally concerned with administrative law. Much of their practice both as litigants and advisors involves administrative law. This course uses a problem orientation to stress practical application of administrative law. There is a final exam with short objective questions and a longer problem question. Method of evaluation: Final exam with short objective questions and a longer problem. AWR: No.GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 9:55 - 11:10am203
ENV5115.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=204ENV5115.AEnvironmental LawFirestone,DavidThis course is an introduction to the law pertaining to environmental issues such as population, economic growth, energy, and pollution. Environmental problems are defined and alternative approaches for dealing with them are examined. Existing statutory efforts such as the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act are analyzed. Method of evaluation: Final examGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 12:45 - 2pm204
ENV5122.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=205ENV5122.ACommunication, Advocacy and LeadershipCarter,JaredA successful environmental professional need to possess the ability to advocate, counsel, investigate, persuade, research, and educate. This course will develop those skills through various writing and oral advocacy projects. In addition to more discrete research and writing projects, students will practice drafting legislation, compose a Freedom of Information Act request, draft a public comment letter, write a grant proposal letter of inquiry, and create an environmental communication campaign. Different skills are emphasized through the exploration of these diverse types of writing. The class will focus extensively on the craft of writing well and communicating to different types of audiences.GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 8:30 - 9:45am205
ENV5125.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=206ENV5125.ALand Use RegulationMilne,JanetThis course reviews and evaluates the traditional American legal controls available to regulate the use of land, including local zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations, as well as more innovative techniques such as growth tempo controls, growth boundaries and transferable development rights. It examines the relevant statutory basis for these techniques and the constitutional limitations on their use, evaluates their effectiveness in controlling "sprawl," and explores the relative roles of state and local government in land use regulation. Method of evaluation: Final exam AWR: No.GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 9:55 - 11:10am206
ENV5212.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=207ENV5212.AClimate Change and the LawParenteau,PatClimate change is the most profound social and environmental issue of the 21st century. This course will integrate the emerging science and law of climate change along with economic and inter-generational equity aspects of the problem. We will consider how existing federal laws such as the Clean Air Act may be used to address climate change as well as how new more comprehensive laws may be fashioned. Different policy instruments will be considered including carbon taxes and emissions trading. State and regional approaches will be considered along with questions of federalism and preemption. Both supply-side and demand-side energy options will be evaluated, along with the transportation and land use sectors. Measures to reduce tropical deforestation and wetland loss will be included. The status of international negotiations under the UNFCCC will be reviewed. Climate litigation will be covered. Guest speakers will provide a variety of perspectives. Method of Evaluation: Three commentaries (500 words each) Final Paper (5000 words) AWR: Yes (3) GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 9:55 - 11:10am207
ENV5226.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=213ENV5226.AEnergy Law and PolicyDworkin,MichaelThe energy industry is both a key to the life that billions seek and America's most significant source of pollution. Environmental problems are the energy industry's most important constraint. This course examines key issues in American energy policy, and searches for ways to resolve or ease the strains which that policy puts upon environmental sustainability. We will review fundamental vocabulary and facts about our energy demands, evaluate sample regulatory orders and statutes and consider legal writings that address many of those elements from the perspective of legal review. Readings will include ethical issues of social justice in siting projects, meeting - or limiting - energy demand, the statutory schemes underlying traditional regulation, and a brief introduction to the wholesale electric markets that are considered in more detail in the follow-up spring semester. Method of evaluation: Mid-term essay; take home final exam and class participation.GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 11:20 - 12:35pm213
ENV5235.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=208ENV5235.ANatural Resources LawTuholske,JackOne third of the nation's land base belongs to the American public and much of it is managed by the United States Forest Service and agencies of the Department of the Interior. Beginning with the creation of Yellowstone, the world's first national park, in 1872, and the protection of federal forest reserves in the 1890s, the United States practically invented the concept of public lands and in the process have left an enduring gift to the nation and the world. These federal lands traditionally provided timber, minerals and forage for a growing nation. In the last 50 years, Americans have to come to appreciate their public lands for wildlife habitat, sources of clean water, wilderness, energy development and a myriad of outdoor recreation opportunities. While America's public lands are vast, they are not limitless. Resource conflicts have dominated land management decisions for the last 40 years. Those conflicts are reflected in the courts, Congress and local communities, where interest groups of all stripes vie for their share of public lands resources. Students will explore not only pertinent statutes and regulations, but the social and economic debates that are equally critical to understand federal public lands and resources. Method of evaluation: Take-home final exam and class project. AWR: No. GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 9:55 - 11:10am208
ENV5245.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=214ENV5245.AWater Resources LawEcheverria,JohnWater is the planet's most precious natural resource. Deciding how it will be shared among competing demands is one of a society's most challenging questions. Water Resources Law is a review of the law and policies concerned with the allocation of water resources in the United States. This course will examine the three main systems of water law in the United States: Eastern riparian systems, the prior appropriation doctrine of the West, and the nationally diverse laws regulating the use of groundwater. The course will also review federal water allocation issues, interstate water disputes, tribal water rights matters, and will highlight contemporary water allocation dilemmas throughout the country. Method of evaluation: Final examGP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 11:20 - 12:35pm214
ENV5250.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=209ENV5250.AWatershed Management and ProtectionTuholske,JackWater Resources, appropriate other water course work or significant practical experience in watershed management.We have managed to create a dizzying patchwork of water management laws that span local, state and federal jurisdictions. We manage ground and surface water, point and non-point source pollution differently. We have a TMDL process that in many key respects remains unenforceable in court. Yet we have managed to clean up a large number of our nation's waters, and in many parts of the country stakeholders are striving to address the hydrological realities of watershed protection in spite of the lack of a coherent legal framework to do so. This class will first explore the patchwork of overlapping laws and jurisdictions and then explore some of the creative solutions, by focusing on a series of actual watershed case studies. Prerequisite: Water Resources, appropriate other water course work or significant practical experience in watershed management. Method of evaluation: Paper, presentation and AWR: Yes. GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 3:35 - 4:50pm209
ENV5304.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=215ENV5304.AComparative Environmental Law Research SeminarLin,YanmeiThis seminar is a research and writing seminar that will provide a framework and faculty supervision for students to engage in comparative environmental law research. While the seminar is designed primarily to support VLS students participating in the U.S.-China joint student research projects, the seminar is sufficiently broad to accommodate students interested in researching the environmental law systems of other countries. The seminar will provide some basic introduction and background on comparative law and methodology, a brief introduction to Chinese environmental law and governance, and other environmental laws in Southeast Asia countries, and research methods and resources. Students will learn basic comparative law methodology and research skills related to navigating a foreign legal system and generate a publishable paper at the end of the course. This course will focus on helping students design/refine their research project proposals and critiquing their research and draft papers. This course is a two-semester sequence (fall 2-credits, spring 1-credit), though the fall semester may be taken independently. Students are required to write a 30-35 page paper (for 3 credits) or a *20-25 page paper (for 2 credits) as their final exam, and are allowed to write this paper together with AWR. Method of evaluation: class performance (10%) and the final paper (90%). *AWR Spring registration 2015. 2.00000000000000GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bR 3:35 - 5:15pm215
ENV5335.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=210ENV5335.AExtinctionParenteau,PatHuman activities are causing a global extinction of plants and animals that rivals the five great extinction events over the earth's geologic history. Habitat loss, overharvest, invasive species and pollution have been the principal causes of this "Sixth Extinction." Climate change exacerbates all of these problems and poses even graver threats to global biodiversity. Ocean acidification -global warming's evil twin -threatens major damage to marine ecosystems. The course looks at how domestic laws like the Endangered Species Act of 1973 and international laws such as CITES, the Convention on Biodiversity, and the forestry provisions of the UNFCCC (REDD+) seek to respond to these threats. Guest speakers will help round out the understanding of the richness and complexity of the issues. Method of evaluation: Three commentaries (500 words each), Final Paper (5000 words) AWHuman activities are causing a global extinction of plants and animals that rivals the five great extinction events over the earth's geologic history. Habitat loss, overharvest, invasive species and pollution have been the principal causes of this "Sixth Extinction." Climate change exacerbates all of these problems and poses even graver threats to global biodiversity. Ocean acidification -global warming's evil twin -threatens major damage to marine ecosystems. The course looks at how domestic laws like the Endangered Species Act of 1973 and international laws such as CITES, the Convention on Biodiversity, and the forestry provisions of the UNFCCC (REDD+) seek to respond to these threats. Guest speakers will help round out the understanding of the richness and complexity of the issues. Method of evaluation: Three commentaries (500 words each), Final Paper (5000 words) AWR: Yes. (3)GP0|#b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928;L0|#0b4211f7e-4adf-47e9-a445-b87a4379c928|2014 Fall;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bT 3:35 - 5:15pm210