​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​The classes below are the current offerings in the law and policy of food, agriculture, food production, and related environmental issues​.

 

 

CLI9428http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1662CLI9428Food & Agriculture ClinicMoses, Aurora<div>Clinic: In the Food and Agriculture Clinic, students collaborate with local, regional, national and international partner organizations to develop and publicly disseminate law, policy and market tools that provide guidance to food system constituencies, including farmers, food entrepreneurs, consumers, legislators, and advocates, on how to advance law, policy and market initiatives that directly or indirectly promote (1) environmentally and economically sustainable agriculture, (2) public health, (3) food access and food security, (4) local and regional agriculture economies and (5) animal welfare. Student clinicians participate in all aspects of project development and execution, gaining experience in both advocacy and the business behind it. Skills practiced in the clinic — including problem solving, cross-professional collaboration, legal research, legal writing, project management, legal resource design, interviewing, public speaking, media and marketing — are transferable to any advocacy context.</div> <div> Method of evaluation: Clinic is high pass/low pass/fail. </div>4.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1662
CLI9428.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1561CLI9428.AFood & Agriculture ClinicRenner,Jamie<div>In the Food and Agriculture Clinic, students collaborate with local, regional, national and international partner organizations to develop and publicly disseminate law, policy and market tools that provide guidance to food system constituencies, including farmers, food entrepreneurs, consumers, legislators, and advocates, on how to advance law, policy and market initiatives that directly or indirectly promote (1) environmentally and economically sustainable agriculture, (2) public health, (3) food access and food security, (4) local and regional agriculture economies and (5) animal welfare. Student clinicians participate in all aspects of project development and execution, gaining experience in both advocacy and the business behind it. Skills practiced in the clinic — including problem solving, cross-professional collaboration, legal research, legal writing, project management, legal resource design, interviewing, public speaking, media and marketing — are transferable to any advocacy context.</div> <div> Method of evaluation: Clinic is high pass/low pass/fail. </div>4.00000000000000GP0|#901c5b0e-e624-4274-9cf0-5c81a94b814f;L0|#0901c5b0e-e624-4274-9cf0-5c81a94b814f|Fall 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1561
CLI9429http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1562CLI9429Food & Agriculture SeminarRenner,Jamie<div>In the Food and Agriculture Clinic seminar, students explore the substantive laws and advocacy skills that underlie their clinic project work.</div> <div> Method of evaluation: The seminar is a letter grade A-F. </div>2.00000000000000GP0|#901c5b0e-e624-4274-9cf0-5c81a94b814f;L0|#0901c5b0e-e624-4274-9cf0-5c81a94b814f|Fall 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1562
CLI9429http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1663CLI9429Food and Agriculture SeminarMoses, Aurora<div></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1663
ENV5108http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1573ENV5108Introduction to the Law and Policy of Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentRistino,Laurie<div>This survey course brings together American law impacting agriculture and food and explores the traditional divisions between agriculture, food, and environmental regulation.  The course provides a hard look at the agriculture and food production sector and involves not only an examination of traditional farming and food safety policies but the ways in which these policies intersect with environmental law and health care policy, as well as important sectors from local land use planning to international trade. The emergence of local food movements also invites an exploration of new business models that provide for entrepreneurial activity in the food and food production space.</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#901c5b0e-e624-4274-9cf0-5c81a94b814f;L0|#0901c5b0e-e624-4274-9cf0-5c81a94b814f|Fall 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1573
ENV5349http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1586ENV5349Regulating the Marine EnvironmentWroth,Kinvin<div>This course examines the interaction of state, federal, and international regimes in the regulation of the marine environment. After a brief historical introduction, the course looks at private rights, the public trust, and the police power in the context of state authority over coastal lands and navigable waters. We then consider the sources of federal power over marine and maritime matters and the relationship of federal preemption of state law and federal incentives for state regulation. The course also briefly addresses the interplay between these domestic regulatory powers and applicable principles and rules of international law. These relationships will be illustrated primarily through issues raised by the marine environment as a source of energy—on the one hand, the nonrenewable resources of the seabed and, on the other hand, the winds, waves, currents, and temperatures of the sea itself.</div> <div> Method of Evaluation: Take-home examination or paper on approved topic.</div> <div> AWR: By agreement with professor.</div>2.00000000000000GP0|#901c5b0e-e624-4274-9cf0-5c81a94b814f;L0|#0901c5b0e-e624-4274-9cf0-5c81a94b814f|Fall 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1586
ENV5365http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1588ENV5365Climate Change: The Power of TaxesMilne,Janet<div>Reducing greenhouse gas emissions requires long-term changes in behavior, and in a capitalist society, industry, businesses, and consumers respond to prices. Increase in the cost of greenhouse gases can reduce emissions, and reductions in the price of alternatives to fossil fuels can increase their use. This seminar explores the ways in which tax systems can send these negative and positive price signals in the United States and elsewhere.  Addressing issues of theory, policy, politics, and law, the seminar will cover topics such as the federal tax incentives for renewable energy, alternative fuel vehicles, and energy conservation, the debate over whether to use carbon taxes or a cap-and-trade approach in the United States, US and European experiences with energy taxes, the role of tax incentives for land conservation in reducing greenhouse gas emissions, and the repeal of tax subsidies for fossil fuels.  While focusing on climate change, the seminar will provide students with the framework for understanding how and when to use tax measures to address other environmental problems as well.<br> Method of evaluation:  Final paper and class participation.  AWR (Yes)<br>Perspectives requirement.</div>2.00000000000000GP0|#901c5b0e-e624-4274-9cf0-5c81a94b814f;L0|#0901c5b0e-e624-4274-9cf0-5c81a94b814f|Fall 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1588
ENV5380http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1683ENV5380Food Regulation and PolicyBeyranevand,Laurie<div>The modern food system, from farm to fork, has given rise to profound health, environmental, social, and cultural consequences.  Bundling these consequences into a series of legal and policy issues, this course will facilitate discussion on a host of topics: food safety, obesity, nutrition, sustainability, food deserts, labeling, marketing, trade, biotechnology, private standards and certification, local food and the relationship between the state, local and federal governments regarding the regulations of food.  Readings of cases, legislation, regulations, and provocative writings will both frame and stimulate class discussion. This course will provide an overview of the field of food regulation, but will also encourage students to challenge our current policies regarding food regulation and consider how to effectively advocate for policy changes. </div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1683
ENV5381http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1589ENV5381Agriculture and Food Entrepreneur Lawyering SkillBoepple,Beth<div> Agriculture and Food Entrepreneurial Law teaches the nuts and bolts of providing legal services to farmers and food entrepreneurs (producers/retailers/restaurants), drawing from the rich examples of farmer and food entrepreneurs locally. Such skills are needed to equip students with real world legal knowledge for those students seeking to provide legal services in this area or who wish to start an entrepreneurial career in food and agriculture. Classes will occur for the first 8 weeks of the semester, starting with Thursday January 14th and ending with Thursday March 3rd, to present the substantive content. For the rest of March and the first week of April (Tuesday March 8th through Thursday April 14th), no regular classes will be held. Students will work on a writing project, attend public/governmental meetings, and have regular contact with professors via email, phone, video-conference, and the like. For the last two weeks of the semester, classes will resume, consisting of role-playing and discussion of content as applied to a hypothetical legal situation</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#901c5b0e-e624-4274-9cf0-5c81a94b814f;L0|#0901c5b0e-e624-4274-9cf0-5c81a94b814f|Fall 2016;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1589
ENV5401http://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1684ENV5401Agricultural Environmental LawRistino,Laurie<div>This course is one of the foundational courses of the agriculture and food law and policy curriculum. Land used for agricultural purposes accounts for nearly 52% of the total land area of the United States--the largest category of land use by far.  Given the shear mass of lands devoted to agriculture, any serious attempt to address environmental problems must include resource management on agricultural lands.  However, the story of law’s treatment of agriculture from an environmental perspective is complex and, at times, one of omission.  Thus, this course addresses the complex and interconnected relationship of environmental and agricultural law, its historical roots and modern developments.  In particular, the course explores the following topics: 1) agriculture in historical legal context; 2) Farm Bill regulatory and incentive-based programs;  3) compliance with other environmental laws—Clean Water Act, Clean Air Act, greenhouse gas regulation; 4)  proliferation of genetically modified organisms in the food supply; 5) animal agriculture and linkages between treatment, production, and environmental impact; 6) the role of agricultural lands in land use planning, including the use of conservation easements and payment for ecosystem services; 7) the rise of organics, locavore, and sustainable food movements; and 8) renewables: how sustainable is biomass as part of US energy solutions?  Finally, the course explores how we might make agriculture more sustainable given global population growth and the impacts of climate change.<br> <br>Method of evaluation:  Final paper; (AWR:  Yes</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#48bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35;L0|#048bc9a23-297d-4d69-9808-2b9fafee0b35|2017 Spring;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1684
ENV5478.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1491ENV5478.AGlobal Food Security and Social Justice<div>This course addresses the legal landscape of global hunger, and the ways in which climate change, population growth and economic inequality intersect with food security law and policy challenges. First, we’ll address how “food security” and “hunger” are defined and measured for policy-making purposes. Then, we’ll explore international legal frameworks supporting food security and comparative domestic legal frameworks impacting food security, including Constitutional food rights, agriculture subsidies and tariffs, and public food and nutrition assistance programs. Next, the course examines the ownership of the food supply, including transnational corporations’ impact on the food system, commodities markets’ impact on global food prices, intellectual property rights with respect to biotechnology/GMO, and the role and impact of the WTO in moderating trade. Finally, we’ll address structural legal shortcomings of our international food aid system. Throughout the course, we’ll examine how climate change, population growth and economic inequality complicate the relevant food security topics.</div> <div><strong>This class is approved for JD credit.</strong></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#0542abcd-651e-4e94-82fe-6cb7ee8d3b72;L0|#00542abcd-651e-4e94-82fe-6cb7ee8d3b72|Fall 2016 - 1 DL;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bAug. 30 - Oct. 19, 20161491
ENV5479.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1499ENV5479.ALaw and Policy of Local Food Systems<div>This course explores state and local policies that impact distribution of food, restaurant regulation, and comparisons of state-level initiatives to bolster local food markets. Students will be exposed to specific skills for small and mid-size producers and entrepreneurs working in the agricultural and food industries. Finally, students will examine the state and local food laws and emerging entrepreneurial trends in food production. As state and local governments often control and implement even sweeping federal laws, students will explore the ground-level realities of working in the new food economy. Many states have implemented local policies in the interest of encouraging increased food production, and students will explore those new trends and innovative experiments.</div> <div><strong>This class is approved for JD credit.</strong></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#7cbec83b-1081-4c4d-aa40-3af932e74a32;L0|#07cbec83b-1081-4c4d-aa40-3af932e74a32|Fall 2016 - 2 DL;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bOct. 15 - Dec. 14, 20161499