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ADR6405.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1195ADR6405.AArbitrationMcCormack,Beth40.0000000000000<div>This course is designed to familiarize students with the legal issues surrounding the arbitration process. Arbitration is an efficient, expeditious, and (sometimes) lower-cost alternative to litigation that is growing in popularity. Many areas of law commonly use arbitration, including securities regulation, commercial law, employment law, medical malpractice, and construction law. This course examines the nature of the arbitration process, rules governing hearings, and the relationship between arbitration and the court system. Students will study issues surrounding the enforceability of agreements to arbitrate, defenses to arbitration clauses, and judicial review of an arbitration award. Students will also learn how to read and draft arbitration provisions. This class will provide students with a thorough understanding of arbitration law and a solid foundation for legal practice, whether in alternative dispute resolution tribunals or in the civil justice system.</div> <div> Method of evaluation: class participation, occasional in-class exercises, and a take-home final examination. </div>2.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 3:35 - 5:15pm1195
ADR6410.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1239ADR6410.AAlternative Dispute ResolutionVogel,Joan16.0000000000000<div>This class presents the theory and practice of negotiation, mediation, and arbitration that constitute the foundation of alternative dispute resolution (ADR). This survey course focuses on the theory and practice of these techniques that are used as alternatives or as additions to formal litigation. Students will examine the different theories, approaches and the wide range of issues (e.g. legal, economic, sociological, moral, ethical, psychological, political to name a few) that arise in the selection and application of these dispute resolution techniques. In addition to classroom discussion, students will participate in simulation exercises in order to engage the different techniques as a neutral, an advocate and a disputant.</div> <div> Students cannot take this course and Environmental Dispute Resolution or ADR & the Environment.</div> <div> Method of evaluation: Class participation and papers. </div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 2:10 - 5:15pm1239
ADR6420.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1196ADR6420.ANegotiationPowers,Donald24.0000000000000<div>Meeting times:  Fridays:  October 2 & October 16; 2:10-6:30. Saturdays: October 3 and October 17; 8:00-6:30.</div><div> </div><div>This course will  explore what it means to be an effective negotiator, and the tools needed to improve on this important life skill.  Students will be expected to learn and apply theories from a broad range of disciplines including law, economics, psychology, sociology and management.  These theories will be discussed and debated in class discussions and practiced through highly interactive simulations.  The course examines the dynamics, constraints, and patterns of effective negotiation.  It focuses equally on the use of negotiation in deal-making and dispute resolution.  We will conduct simulations in a variety of contexts.  We will explore how dynamics change when moving from two-party to multi-party negotiations, the added complexity of effectively representing parties in negotiations, and how ethics should influence our behavior.  Readings will need to be completed ahead of time and a final project will be completed after classes.<br> <br>Satisfies skills requirement.<br>JD/MELP:  Alternative Dispute Resolution.<br>Method of Evaluation: Performance in simulations, participation in class and a final negotiation (Does not satisfy AWR)<br>This is a limited enrollment course (24)<br></div><div> </div><div> </div>2.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bS 8 - 6:30pm, F 2:10 - 6:30pm1196
BUS6226.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1265BUS6226.ACorporate FinanceMullaney,Joseph16.0000000000000<div></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bT 9:55 - 11:10am1265
BUS6235.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1197BUS6235.ACorporations and Other Business AssociationsGoodenough,Oliver80.0000000000000<div>This course will prepare you to understand and provide advice on the principal organizational forms used to structure businesses in the United States. These forms include corporations, limited liability companies, limited partnerships, general partnerships and sole proprietorships. We will also examine the law of agency. Course coverage includes an introduction to securities regulation through the lens of insider trading.</div> <div> Method of evaluation: Final exam</div>4.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 3:35 - 5:15pm1197
BUS6262.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1194BUS6262.ASocial Enterprise LawGoodenough,Oliver30.0000000000000<div>​This course examines legal structures that social and environmental enterprises currently use to accomplish their missions—nonprofit organizations, traditional for-profits, L3Cs, benefit corporations, cooperatives and other business forms that place "Planet" and "People" ahead of or on an equal footing with "Profit." The course contemplates the advantages and disadvantages of using these forms to accomplish these missions, how they should be adopted or modified, and whether society should devise other structures to further these missions. Students will examine these issues through the lens of four existing organizations—1) a for-profit, 2) a nonprofit, 3) a hybrid, and 4) a cooperative or employee owned organization. Students will be evaluated on their participation in the classroom and with the virtual tools such as wikis and discussion forums, as well as on a final White Paper that suggests ways public policy towards social and environmental enterprises should be improved.</div>2.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 11:20 - 12:35pm1194
BUS6280.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1240BUS6280.ASalesFirestone,David80.0000000000000<div>​This course covers primarily Article 2 of the Uniform Commercial Code. Article 2 governs sales of goods. Coverage includes formation and modification of contracts for sale, Article 2's statute of frauds, warranties, and risk allocations when goods are stored or transported, breach, remedies for sellers and buyers, and contractual limitations on remedies. The course will include references to consumer rights as well as comparisons between the common law of contract and the Code's rules and concepts.</div> <div> <strong>Method of evaluation: Final exam</strong></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 3:35 - 5:15pm1240
BUS6290.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1241BUS6290.ASecurities RegulationTaub,Jennifer40.0000000000000<div>This course introduces students to the federal laws and regulations designed to protect investors in the U.S. We identify the registration and disclosure requirements for securities offerings as well as the ongoing disclosure and other requirements associated with secondary market distribution. We explore the context and content of the first federal securities law of the 1930s through the most recent law affecting the financial markets, the Dodd-Frank Wall Street Reform and Consumer Protection Act of 2010. We cover the potential liability of various players involved in the offering and sale of securities, including issuers, officers, directors, brokers, dealers, attorneys, auditors and other participants. We consider issues regarding "insider" trading. Brief study is also made of the role of financial intermediaries such as broker-dealers, investment advisers, mutual funds and other investment companies.</div> <div><strong> Method of evaluation: take-home exam or paper. Written paper may satisfy the AWR requirement. (Check AWR requirements in the Student Handbook).</strong></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 2:10 - 3:25pm1241
BUS6361.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1242BUS6361.AeLawyering: eDiscovery and Big DataEicks,Jeannette20.0000000000000<div>This course will prepare you for the modern practice of law, and teach the skills necessary to request, produce and manage documents in this age of electronically stored information. 95% of cases never go to trial; they are litigated to conclusion through pre-trial strategy and discovery. Discovery today is largely (estimates around 85%) based on discovering ESI. Students who have taken this course will have skills that offer added value to hiring firms. eDiscovery is now a multi-billion dollar industry, which can be a source of good jobs for graduates educated in the area. The concepts and skills taught in this course have little overlap with other courses.</div> <div> The following objectives will be addressed in this course – all of which offer opportunities to analyze the impacts of technology on law: <li> Understand ESI representation of clients in transactional law and litigation.</li> <li> Explore the jurisprudential impacts of technology on how we conceive of and apply law.</li> <li> Demonstrate an understanding of the application of legal ethics in the area of ESI.</li> <li> Explain the technical and practical problems presented to clients and counsel as they prepare for and respond to eDiscovery requests.</li> <li> Describe the features of an eDiscovery plan and the considerations involved in creating one.</li> <li> Explain the importance and the steps that maybe taken to maintain computer and network security and avoid spoliation.</li> <li> Explain methods by which parties learn about the opposing party's technical infrastructure and ESI.</li> <li> Discuss difficulties which spring from the inability of counsel and client to reach agreement regarding ESI</li> <li> Demonstrated knowledge of the FRCP and the Rules of Evidence as they relate to ESI.</li></div> <div> Method of evaluation: Three projects and a hands-on component.</div> <div> <strong>AWR - Yes</strong></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 11:20 - 12:35pm1242
BUS6362.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1469BUS6362.AeLawyering: Practice ManagementEicks,Jeannette<div>Law firms require general business knowledge, legal practice specific business knowledge and knowledge of the technologies that enable support those functions.  Today solo practices to large law firms are using practice management and litigation software to assist with the day to day operation of firms.  Courts have in the direction of paperless filing and calendaring, indeed many courts only allow e-filing.  Modernized courts have many opportunities for counsel to use technology to make a stronger case or as needed to present electronic evidence.  This course will provide students with the theoretical and practical background to understand the fundamentals of operating a law practice as well as the rapid evolution of legal practice.  Areas of special focus include business planning and account management; case and client management; mobile information and devices; document management; eMediation and online dispute resolution; workflow management; eCourt systems and presentation technologies. Readings and guest speakers will address both general technological issues as well as specific legal ramifications. Students will use matter management software to organize and manage a mock case, prepare e-filings and use technology to strengthen a closing argument and present that argument in a courtroom setting.<br> Method of evaluation:  <br>25% Short exercises<br>75% Three Projects - 1) writing a law firm business plan; 2) organization and arrangement of a mock case utilizing matter management software; and 3) the development of a technology driven closing argument incorporating digital evidence using Federal court software.<br></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bT 3:35-5:15pm1469
CLI9302.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1198CLI9302.AEnvironmntal and Natural Resources Law ClinicRuley,Doug<div>The Environmental and Natural Resources Law Clinic functions as a public interest environmental law firm with a collegial atmosphere that encourages interaction and feedback among students and Clinic faculty. Under the supervision of experienced environmental attorneys, student clinicians represent community groups and conservation organizations in real-world cases and projects. Although the clinic experience varies from student to student depending on the cases and projects assigned, student clinicians typically learn how to: communicate with clients, experts, agency personnel, opposing parties, and the media; conduct site visits; investigate scientific, technical, and other factual information; gather public records using FOIA and state public record laws; engage in specialized legal research; draft and file court briefs and pleadings in compliance with local rules; conduct written and oral discovery; analyze complex legal and factual materials; develop legal theories, claims, and arguments; engage in strategic decision-making; negotiate with opposing parties and craft settlement agreements; and comply with ethical and professional standards. The goal of the clinical experience is to develop well-rounded professionals with a high degree of skill and judgment grounded in service to clients and respect for the environment and the rule of law. While learning the craft of lawyering, students are expected to give careful attention to the ethical aspects of practicing law, and to evaluate alternative approaches to resolving environmental conflicts.</div> <div> Practicum, Classroom Component, and Clinic Hours: Required classes two days/week—one hour fifteen minutes each class. A student's schedule for the student's other clinic hours will be determined by the individual student in consultation with clinical faculty. Students who enroll in the Clinic may not enroll in courses that conflict with the required two/days a week ENRLC classes.</div> <div> Legal Profession is strongly recommended for students enrolling in any clinic term. In addition, during the selection process, priority will generally be given to students who have successfully completed Administrative Law and Environmental Law (or another substantive environmental law course).</div> <div> Registration: The ENRLC conducts interviews with interested applicants in the spring for the Fall Semester and in the fall for the Spring Semester. The ENRLC will also have a separate interview process for the summer. If a student is selected for the ENRLC by clinical faculty, the ENRLC will provide the Registrar's Office with a list of all accepted applicants and will register them for the course.</div> <div> Full-time program, 13-credits; students may not register for another course in the semester they take the ENRLC without the express consent of the Director of the Clinic.</div> <div> Method of evaluation is pass/fail (PH, P, LP, F)</div> <div> Clinic faculty are happy to supervise AWR papers, but clinic writing projects usually cannot fulfill the AWR.</div>GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 2:10 - 3:25pm1198
CLI9310.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1199CLI9310.ASouth Royalton Legal Clinic FTMay,James<div>Students work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel. Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners. Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship. Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and investigate cases, draft pleadings and memoranda, participate in negotiations, and conduct evidentiary and appellate hearings, all under the supervision of one of the Clinic's attorneys. Participation in the Clinic can be counted toward completion of Vermont's three-month clerkship requirement.</div> <div> <strong>It is recommended that students take Evidence and/or Trial Practice prior to enrolling in the Clinic, but neither is required.</strong></div>10.0000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1199
CLI9312.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1200CLI9312.ASouth Royalton Legal Clinic PTMay,JamesRecommended Evidence and/or Trial Practice<div>Students work on a variety of civil cases, representing persons unable to afford private counsel. Cases are in such areas as Social Security; income maintenance; unemployment compensation; domestic relations; bankruptcy; landlord-tenant relations; consumer protection; juvenile law; representation of children; immigration; and assistance to prisoners. Student practice rules in state/federal courts allow students to file pleadings, conduct discovery, and make court appearances with the consent of the court and under attorney sponsorship. Students interview and counsel clients, prepare and investigate cases, draft pleadings and memoranda, participate in negotiations, and conduct evidentiary and appellate hearings, all under the supervision of one of the Clinic's attorneys. Participation in the Clinic can be counted toward completion of Vermont's three-month clerkship requirement.</div> <div> <strong>It is recommended that students take Evidence and/or Trial Practice prior to enrolling in the Clinic, but neither is required.</strong></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1200
CLI9315.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1201CLI9315.ASouth Royalton Legal Clinic ClassMay,James<div><strong>Fall 2015-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks: 8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks.</strong></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMTWRF 8:30 - 9:45am1201
CLI9315.Bhttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1202CLI9315.BSouth Royalton Legal Clinic ClassMay,James3<div><strong>​​Fall 2015-- two sections, students must attend one of the following daily for the first 3 weeks: 8:30 -- 9:45 AM or 2:10 -- 3:25 PM. NOTE: For both Fall sections, classes are held Monday-Friday for 3 weeks.</strong></div>GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMTWRF 2:10 - 3:25pm1202
CLI9326.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1203CLI9326.AAdvanced Environmental and Natural Resources Clinic 6Ruley,Doug<div>Advanced Environmental Natural Resources Law Clinic.</div>6.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1203
CLI9329.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1204CLI9329.AAdvanced Environmental and Natural Resources Clinic 9Ruley,Doug<div>Advanced Environmental Natural Resources Law Clinic.</div>9.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1204
CLI9333.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1205CLI9333.AAdvanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 13May,James<div>Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.</div>13.0000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1205
CLI9336.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1206CLI9336.AAdvanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 6May,James<div>Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.</div>6.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1206
CLI9339.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1207CLI9339.AAdvanced South Royalton Legal Clinic 9May,James<div>Students will further develop their understanding of law, broad philosophical, economic and scientific underpinnings of their work, and lawyering skills introduced in their initial SRLC experience. Students will be expected to take greater responsibility for cases and to mentor novice clinicians. Enrollment is by permission of the clinic director.  Credits awarded are appropriate for the number of clinic hours worked.</div>9.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1207
CLI9350.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1208CLI9350.ACriminal Law ClinicSaxman,Anna<div></div>GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 5:25 - 7:25pm1208
CLI9411.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1209CLI9411.ASemester In Practice (SIP)Cimini,Christine<div>The Semester in Practice Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice.  The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Field-mentors are experienced lawyers who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The SiP provides an opportunity – through observation, participation, practice, and reflection – to improve students’ legal knowledge and skills and to inform and expand their vision of what the practice and profession of law can be.  <br>Components and Requirements of the SiP Course:  There are two different components to the SiP program:  a practicum component and a classroom component.  Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program.  For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site field mentor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.  All students are required to participate in a five-day on-line orientation prior to the first day of work on-site.  <br>Credits and Grading:  students enrolled in the full time program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits.  Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded.  <br>Eligibility:  <br>1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. <br>2. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials.  (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). <br>Application Deadlines:<br>1. In order to participate in a Fall SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st.<br>2. In order to participate in a Spring SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.  <br> <br>Satisfies the skills requirement.<br></div>GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1209
CLI9412.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1210CLI9412.ASemester In Practice ClassCimini,Christine<div>The Semester in Practice Program is a field-based externship in which students apprentice (without pay) with lawyers in all areas of practice.  The SiP is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Field-mentors are experienced lawyers who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The SiP provides an opportunity – through observation, participation, practice, and reflection – to improve students’ legal knowledge and skills and to inform and expand their vision of what the practice and profession of law can be.  <br>Components and Requirements of the SiP Course:  There are two different components to the SiP program:  a practicum component and a classroom component.  Students are provided supervision in each aspect of the program.  For the practicum component, students are designated an on-site field mentor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.  All students are required to participate in a five-day on-line orientation prior to the first day of work on-site.  <br>Credits and Grading:  students enrolled in the full time program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits.  Experiential credits are awarded on a pass-fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded.  <br>Eligibility:  <br>1. Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate. <br>2. Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials.  (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form). <br>Application Deadlines:<br>1. In order to participate in a Fall SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st.<br>2. In order to participate in a Spring SiP, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.  <br> <br>Satisfies the skills requirement.<br></div>GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1210
CLI9425.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1211CLI9425.AJD Part-Time ExternshipWhite,Jeffry<div>The Part-Time JD Externship Program offers a field-based experiential opportunity in which student’s apprentice (without compensation) to lawyers in all areas of practice.  The part-time externship program is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced mentor. Field-supervisors are experienced lawyers who work with and within: government (state, federal and local), NGO's, non-profit organizations, corporations and law firms.  The Part-Time Externship provides students an opportunity to participate in a range of lawyering tasks so that they develop an improved understanding of the legal process and of legal problems at all stages of resolution.</div><div>Components and Requirements of the Part-Time JD Externship Course:  There are two different components to the Part-Time JD Externship program:  a practicum component and an academic component.  Students are provided supervision in each component of the course.  For the practicum component, students are assigned an on-site field supervisor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.  Externship faculty has the option on a semester-by-semester basis of doing either individual conference sessions or regular classroom sessions.  All students are required to participate in an orientation during the first week of the externship semester.</div><div>Credits and Grading:  Students may earn from four to six credits.  Credits are awarded on a pass/fail basis.  Students enrolled in the part-time program must work three hours a week for 15 weeks for each credit earned.  For example, a six credit externship requires 2.4 days or 18 hours of work per week.  A mandatory seminar component is included within the pass/fail evaluation, and there is no additional credit for the seminar.  Students take classes on-campus during the semester in addition to participating in a JD externship.</div><div>Eligibility:</div><div>1.      Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate.</div><div>2.      Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials.  (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form).</div><div>Application Deadlines:</div><div>1.      In order to participate in a Fall Part-Time JD Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by April 1st.</div><div>2.      In order to participate in a Spring Part-Time JD Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.</div><div>Satisfies the skills requirement.  AWR: No<br></div>GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 5:30 - 6:30pm1211
CLI9427.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1212CLI9427.AEnergy ClinicJones,Kevin<div>Through this course students will be introduced to the practical aspects of real world energy projects.  Students will become involved in some aspect of the development or evaluation of real life energy projects (e.g. solar PV, energy efficiency, electric vehicle infrastructure) and may have the opportunity to support the legal and policy requirements of a particular project or through the development of model legal documents to facilitate future projects.  Students will be introduced to the state and federal statutes, rules, tax codes, and ordinances that apply to the development of energy projects particularly those that promote sustainability at the community level.  Given the project development cycle while students may only be involved in one or more transactional elements of the project the goal of the course will be to also provide a framework for understanding how their specific component fits within the complete project cycle.  Specific projects undertaken by the energy clinic will be selected in order to support some social justice or environmental benefit including community ownership, greenhouse gas reduction, or low income energy affordability goals.  Classroom instruction will be through IEE faculty, fellows, and guest lecturers. </div>4.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1212
CLI9428.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1213CLI9428.AFood and Agriculture ClinicRenner,Jamie<div>Clinic:  In the Food and Agriculture Clinic, students collaborate with local, regional, national and international partner organizations to develop and publicly disseminate law, policy and market tools that provide guidance to food system constituencies, including farmers, food entrepreneurs, consumers, legislators, and advocates, on how to advance law, policy and market initiatives that directly or indirectly promote (1) environmentally and economically sustainable agriculture, (2) public health, (3) food access and food security, (4) local and regional agriculture economies and (5) animal welfare.  Student clinicians participate in all aspects of project development and execution, gaining experience in both advocacy and the business behind it.  Skills practiced in the clinic — including problem solving, cross-professional collaboration, legal research, legal writing, project management, legal resource design, interviewing, public speaking, media and marketing — are transferable to any advocacy context.</div><div> </div><div>Method of evaluation:  Clinic is high pass/low pass/fail.  </div>4.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1213
CLI9429.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1214CLI9429.AFood and Agriculture SeminarRenner,Jamie<div>Seminar:  In the Food and Agriculture Clinic seminar, students explore the substantive laws and advocacy skills that underlie their clinic project work.</div><div> </div><div>Method of evaluation:  The seminar is a letter grade A-F.  </div>2.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1214
CLI9430.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1215CLI9430.AJudicial ExternshipWhite,Jeffry<div>The Judicial Externship Program offers a field-based experiential opportunity in which student’s apprentice (without compensation) in judicial chambers.  The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial clerk.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision-making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develop writing, research and analytical skills.</div><div>Components and Requirements of the Judicial Externship:  There are two different components to the Judicial Externship:  a practicum component and a classroom component.  Students are provided supervision in each component of the course.  For the practicum component, students are assigned an on-site judicial supervisor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.  All students are required to participate in a one-day orientation prior to the first day of work on-site.</div><div>Credits and Grading:  Students enrolled in the judicial externship program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits.  Experiential credits are awarded on a pass/fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded.</div><div>Eligibility:</div><div>1.      Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate.</div><div>2.      Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials.  (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form).</div><div>Application Deadlines:</div><div>1.      In order to participate in a Fall Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st.</div><div>2.      In order to participate in a Spring Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.</div><div> </div><div>Satisfies the skills requirement.</div><div>AWR:  No.<br></div>11.0000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1215
CLI9431.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1216CLI9431.AJudicial Externship SeminarWhite,Jeffry<div>The Judicial Externship Program offers a field-based experiential opportunity in which student’s apprentice (without compensation) in judicial chambers.  The Judicial Externship is appropriate for students interested in self-directed learning under the supervision of an experienced judge and judicial clerk.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to learn about the process of judicial decision-making by observing the function of a particular court while thinking about the management and administration of the court system.  The Judicial Externship provides students the opportunity to develop writing, research and analytical skills.</div><div>Components and Requirements of the Judicial Externship:  There are two different components to the Judicial Externship:  a practicum component and a classroom component.  Students are provided supervision in each component of the course.  For the practicum component, students are assigned an on-site judicial supervisor.  For the classroom component, each student is assigned a faculty supervisor from Vermont Law School.  All students are required to participate in a one-day orientation prior to the first day of work on-site.</div><div>Credits and Grading:  Students enrolled in the judicial externship program work for 15 weeks, 40 hours each week and receive 11 experiential credits and 2 classroom credits.  Experiential credits are awarded on a pass/fail basis and classroom credits are letter-graded.</div><div>Eligibility:</div><div>1.      Students who are in their 4th, 5th and 6th semester who have a GPA of 2.4 or higher are eligible to participate.</div><div>2.      Timely submission of a request to enroll form and submission of required materials.  (a list of required materials is included on the request to enroll form).</div><div>Application Deadlines:</div><div>1.      In order to participate in a Fall Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by February 1st.</div><div>2.      In order to participate in a Spring Judicial Externship, students must complete the request to enroll by September 30th.</div><div> </div><div>Satisfies the skills requirement.</div><div>AWR:  No.<br></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1216
CLI9450.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1217CLI9450.ALand Use ClinicGjessing,Catherine<div></div>GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 5:25 - 7:25pm1217
CRI7307.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1218CRI7307.ACriminal Practice and ProcedureSaxman,Anna30.0000000000000<div>The course will focus on the Federal Rules of Criminal Procedure and the 4th, 5th, 6th, 8th and 14th amendments to the U.S. Constitution. Students will examine the constitutional principles of criminal procedure and how those principles are actually utilized in practice. This course will give students the basic understanding of the theoretical underpinnings of constitutional criminal law and procedure while at the same time learning the practical application of theory to practice. The course curriculum will focus attention on: bail, search and seizure, the right against self-incrimination and involuntary confessions, discovery, Double Jeopardy, Confrontation Clause, the right to effective assistance of counsel, judgment of acquittal motions, jury instructions and sentencing. Students will have the opportunity to draft and argue motions in criminal pre-trial and trial litigation. This course is a blend of the practical and theoretical, and students can expect to leave this class knowing how to analyze factual scenarios using constitutional criminal law cases and the Rules. Students will be expected to argue motions in front of the class as well as serve as judge's ruling on the motions made in class. Students will have the opportunity to improve their legal analysis, writing and oral argument skills.</div>4.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 5:25 - 7:10pm1218
CRI7313.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1243CRI7313.ACapital Punishment SeminarPhilip Meyer16.0000000000000<div>This seminar examines capital punishment as a legal process, using interdisciplinary materials and theory, litigation documents including briefs and recordings of oral arguments, and appellate opinions. The seminar also employs written narratives, movies, and popular cultural images and artifacts to explore this subject matter. Diverse topics in the course may include: analyzing legal arguments for and against the death penalty (whether capital punishment does or does not violate the constitution); the court's ongoing attempts to articulate meaningful standards for deciding who deserves to die; the sociology of death row confinement; the methods of capital punishment (electrocution, lethal injection, etc.); the impact of capital punishment upon various actors (guards, judges, families of the executed, etc.); moral arguments for and against the death penalty; issues of age, race and gender and the death penalty; terrorism and the death penalty; theories of punishment and the death penalty; and the history of capital punishment in America. </div> <div> <strong>Satisfies perspective requirement.</strong></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bT 3:35 - 5:15pm1243
CRI7331.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1266CRI7331.AImpaired Driving SeminarSand,Robert20.0000000000000<div>Combining substantive law with actual criminal case documents, simulations, and hands-on practice in class, the Impaired Driving Course for 2L and 3L students will cover all aspects of DUI cases from arrest through prosecution and sentencing. This 3-credit course will meet one day per week and will be graded on a High Pass, Pass, Low Pass, Fail basis. There are no prerequisites, although students might benefit from taking an upper level criminal law class before this course. The semester will culminate with a mock hearing or trial.</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 3:35 - 6:35pm1266
CRI7350.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1219CRI7350.ACriminal Law ClinicSaxman,Anna<div>This course gives students the opportunity to experience criminal practice in either prosecution or defense settings under the close supervision of our distinguished practitioner-faculty members. Students will be placed in the prosecution, defense or appellate defense practice settings, and will receive classroom instruction once per week for two hours covering foundational aspects of Vermont criminal. Students will then apply classroom concepts in real criminal cases, working under close supervision of the classroom faculty, Anna Saxman (Vermont Deputy Defender General) David Cahill (Deputy State's Attorney, WRJ) and Brian Marsicovetere (Marsicovetere Law Group, PC) contracted to provide public defender services in Windsor County).</div> <div>This is a 6 credit course:<br> 2 credit hours of classroom – once a week for 2 hours; and<br> 4 credit hours of clinic work – twice a week, on Tuesdays and Thursdays, for a total of 13 hours.</div> <div> The course will be graded High Pass/Pass/Low Pass/Fail.</div> <div>Enrollment is limited to 6 students.</div> <div><strong>This course satisfies the skills requirement.</strong></div>6.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 5:30 - 6:30pm1219
DIV7610.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1220DIV7610.ARace and the Law SeminarJefferson,Shirley20.0000000000000<div>The purpose of the course is to introduce students to race as it relates to and is reflected in the law. The focus will primarily be on the role and experience of African-Americans, Asian-Americans, Latin-Americans, and Native-Americans in American society, with attention to questions concerning critical race theory, class, family, and feminism. The course will also examine the way law relates to racial diversity in the United States.</div> <div><strong>Method of evaluation: Final paper. AWR yes.</strong></div>GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 3:35 - 5:15pm1220
ENV5108.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1244ENV5108.AIntro to Law and Policy of Agriculture, Food and EnvironmentRistino,Laurie<div>​This survey course brings together American law impacting agriculture and food and explores the traditional divisions between agriculture, food, and environmental regulation. The course provides a hard look at the agriculture and food production sector and involves not only an examination of traditional farming and food safety policies but the ways in which these policies intersect with environmental law and health care policy, as well as important sectors from local land use planning to international trade. The emergence of local food movements also invites an exploration of new business models that provide for entrepreneurial activity in the food and food production space.</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 2:10 - 3:25pm1244
ENV5115.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1221ENV5115.AEnvironmental LawFirestone,David<div>This course is an introduction to the law pertaining to environmental issues such as population, economic growth, energy, and pollution. Environmental problems are defined and alternative approaches for dealing with them are examined. Existing statutory efforts such as the National Environmental Policy Act, the Clean Air Act, and the Resource Conservation and Recovery Act are analyzed.</div> <div><strong>Method of evaluation: Final exam</strong></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 12:45 - 2pm1221
ENV5122.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1238ENV5122.ACommunications, Advocacy and Leadership25.0000000000000<div></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81b1238
ENV5125.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1222ENV5125.ALand Use RegulationMilne,Janet<div>This course reviews and evaluates the traditional American legal controls available to regulate the use of land, including local zoning ordinances and subdivision regulations, as well as more innovative techniques such as growth tempo controls, growth boundaries and transferable development rights. It explores the legal design of different techniques, the relevant statutory basis for their use and constitutional limitations on their use, and their effectiveness in guiding land use patterns as society's needs change over time. Although the course focuses primarily on local land use regulations, it also addresses several state-level land use regimes and the relative roles of state and local government in land use regulation.</div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 9:55 - 11:10am1222
ENV5212.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1223ENV5212.AClimate Change and the LawParenteau,Patrick<div>Climate change is the most profound social and environmental issue of the 21st century. This course will integrate the emerging science and law of climate change along with economic and inter-generational equity aspects of the problem. We will consider how existing federal laws such as the Clean Air Act may be used to address climate change as well as how new more comprehensive laws may be fashioned. Different policy instruments will be considered including carbon taxes and emissions trading. State and regional approaches will be considered along with questions of federalism and preemption. Both supply-side and demand-side energy options will be evaluated, along with the transportation and land use sectors. Measures to reduce tropical deforestation and wetland loss will be included. The status of international negotiations under the UNFCCC will be reviewed. Climate litigation will be covered. Guest speakers will provide a variety of perspectives.</div> <div> Method of Evaluation: Three commentaries (500 words each) Final Paper (5000 words)</div> <div><strong>AWR: Yes (3)</strong></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 9:55 - 11:10am1223
ENV5218.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1267ENV5218.AInternational Climate Change LawBach,Tracy<div> Class work will focus on the language and structure of the UN Framework Convention on Climate Change (UNFCCC) and its Kyoto Protocol; the COP/CMP process and procedure; specific substantive issues like REDD+ and land use overall, adaptation and the Loss and Damage Mechanism (LDM), CDM and other flexibility mechanisms, finance and technology transfer, and post Kyoto Protocol negotiations under the ADP; individual parties' and party groups' negotiating positions; and the role of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) and side events in the process.</div> <div> Delegation members will attend one week of COP21 plenary sessions and side events, where they will follow negotiations and issue development, and blog about their observations and analysis. In addition, students will work to support a Least Developed Country (LDC) State Party delegation in the COP21/CMP11 negotiations, to apply their learning through service to others. The VLS delegation will track topics of interest for this UNFCCC state party, brief it on COP activities, and prepare research and analysis of COP21/CMP11 negotiation issues. Through both the classroom and experiential components of this course, students will develop a deeper understanding of international environmental lawmaking informed by first-hand experience.</div> <div> This is a writing intensive course and so students' work in it is evaluated via briefing memos (2), blogging (both before and during the COP), note taking at the COP, and a short reflective memo upon return from the COP. In addition, students are evaluated on their contributions to the classroom discussions, active engagement at the COP, and overall teamwork.</div> <div> During the on-site component in Paris, students will represent VLS as members of its Observer Delegation accredited by the United Nations. As such, they will be expected to comport themselves in an appropriate manner, attend all assigned COP sessions and side events, and contribute to the delegation's social media presence. Students agree that by registering for the course and being selected for the delegation, they will attend COP21 in December, 2015.</div> <div> Attendance at COP21 will require students to miss either the last week of classes or the first week of reading period/ exams. Students will work with Professor Bach to minimize the impact that their COP21 absence has on their other classes.</div> <div> Students will arrange and pay for their own travel expenses to and from Paris, scheduling their travel to arrive the day before their COP21 week begins and to depart after their COP21 week has finished. We will strive to keep our costs down by sharing a living space and meals; students can estimate up approximately $2000-2500 for airfare, shared lodging, and shared meals (breakfast and dinner).</div> <div> Please note: The UNFCCC Secretariat limits our observer delegation to 5 student members per week or 10 students total. To stay within this limit, registered students will be selected for the delegation based on a combination of the following information:</div> <div> 1. relevant course work, such as International Law, International Environmental Law, and Climate Change and the Law (whether taught on campus or via distance learning);<br> 2. an interview with Professor Bach;<br> 3. a timed writing sample, and<br> 4. an application form that includes your VLS transcript and 1 VLS reference.</div> <div> <strong>Method of evaluation is spelled out in the description (no exam, variety of writing projects) and the AWR option is NOT offered.</strong></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bR 3:35 - 5:15pm1267
ENV5226.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1224ENV5226.AEnergy Law and Policy in a Carbon-Constrained WorldDworkin,Michael<div>The energy industry is both a key to the life that billions seek and America's most significant source of pollution. Environmental problems are the energy industry's most important constraint.</div> <div> This course examines key issues in American energy policy, and searches for ways to resolve or ease the strains which that policy puts upon environmental sustainability.</div> <div> We will review fundamental vocabulary and facts about our energy demands, evaluate sample regulatory orders and statutes and consider legal writings that address many of those elements from the perspective of legal review. Readings will include ethical issues of social justice in siting projects, meeting – or limiting – energy demand, the statutory schemes underlying traditional regulation, and a brief introduction to the wholesale electric markets that are considered in more detail in the follow-up spring semester.</div> <div><strong> Method of evaluation: Mid-term essay; take home final exam and class participation.</strong></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 11:20 - 12:35pm1224
ENV5235.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1225ENV5235.ANatural Resources LawHoffmann,Hillary<div>One third of the nation’s land base belongs to the American public and much of it is managed by the United States Forest Service and agencies of the Department of the Interior. Beginning with the creation of Yellowstone, the world’s first national park, in 1872, and the protection of federal forest reserves in the 1890s, the United States practically invented the concept of public lands and in the process have left an enduring gift to the nation and the world.</div> <div> These federal lands traditionally provided timber, minerals and forage for a growing nation. In the last 50 years, Americans have to come to appreciate their public lands for wildlife habitat, sources of clean water, wilderness, energy development and a myriad of outdoor recreation opportunities. While America's public lands are vast, they are not limitless. Resource conflicts have dominated land management decisions for the last 40 years. Those conflicts are reflected in the courts, Congress and local communities, where interest groups of all stripes vie for their share of public lands resources. Students will explore not only pertinent statutes and regulations, but the social and economic debates that are equally critical to understand federal public lands and resources, including climate change.</div> <div><strong> Method of evaluation: Final exam. AWR (No)</strong></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 11:20 - 12:35pm1225
ENV5245.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1245ENV5245.AWater Resources LawEcheverria,John<div>Water is the planet's most precious natural resource. Deciding how it will be shared among competing demands is one of a society's most challenging questions. Water Resources Law is a review of the law and policies concerned with the allocation of water resources in the United States. This course will examine the three main systems of water law in the United States: Eastern riparian systems, the prior appropriation doctrine of the West, and the nationally diverse laws regulating the use of groundwater. The course will also review federal water allocation issues, interstate water disputes, tribal water rights matters, and will highlight contemporary water allocation dilemmas throughout the country.</div> <div><strong> Method of evaluation: Final exam</strong></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bMW 11:20 - 12:35pm1245
ENV5250.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1246ENV5250.AWatershed Management and ProtectionTuholske,Jack<div>We have managed to create a dizzying patchwork of surface and groundwater management laws that span local, state and federal jurisdictions. This class will first examine the Clean Water Act, interstate compacts, common law and state and local watershed management strategies then embark on a review of the creative solutions, by focusing on a series of actual watershed case studies throughout the US and abroad. . Students will prepare and present their own watershed management plan as the major project for this class.</div> <div><strong>Limited enrollment.</strong></div> <div><strong></strong> </div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 3:35 - 4:50pm1246
ENV5304.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1192ENV5304.AComparative Environmental Law Research SeminarLin,Yanmei<div>This seminar is a research and writing seminar that will provide a framework and faculty supervision for students to engage in comparative environmental law research. While the seminar is designed primarily to support VLS students participating in the U.S.-Asia environmental law research projects, the seminar is sufficiently broad to accommodate students interested in researching the environmental law systems of other countries. The seminar will provide some basic introduction and background on comparative law and methodology, a brief introduction to Chinese environmental law and governance, and other environmental laws in Southeast Asia countries, and research methods and resources. Students will learn basic comparative law methodology and research skills related to navigating a foreign legal system and generate a series of research reports or a publishable paper at the end of the course.</div> <div> This course will focus on helping students design/refine their research project proposals and critiquing their research and draft papers.</div> <div><strong> This course is a two-semester sequence (fall 2-credits, spring 1-credit), though the fall semester may be taken independently. Students are required to write a paper or a series of research reports of 30-35 page equivalent (for 3 credits) or a paper or a series of research reports of 20-25 page equivalent (for 2 credits) as their final exam.</strong></div> <div><strong> Spring 2016; ENV5306; 1 credit continuation-registration must be added with faculty sponsor.</strong></div> <div><strong> Method of evaluation: class performance (10%) and the final paper (90%).</strong></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 3:35 - 5:15pm1192
ENV5305.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1247ENV5305.AEnvironmental Ethics SeminarLoder,ReedCredits: 2-3<div>This seminar examines the values and ethical assumptions in problem solving about the environment, enabling students to perfect their reasoning about environmental law and policy. It introduces various ethical approaches to resolving environmental problems, including: intrinsic value, biocentrism, utilitarianism, eco-feminism, deep ecology, social ecology, eco-centric, and religious/spiritual. These ethical foundations are applied to concrete environmental policy issues, covering aspects of species and place restoration, climate change, relationships of humans to the non-human world, global justice, and responsibilities to future generations. A central goal of the course is to assist students in developing and refining a personal and professional environmental ethic.</div> <div> Course materials include interdisciplinary readings on the environment in philosophy, religion, law, natural science, and literature. Students prepare a seminar paper and present their work to the class. Students may take the seminar for 2 or 3 credits, and requirements vary depending on credits elected.</div> <div><strong> Method of evaluation: Seminar paper and presentation to the class. (Requirements vary depending on credits elected 2 or 3 credits.)</strong></div>GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bW 3:35 - 5:15pm1247
ENV5335.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1248ENV5335.AExtinction and Climate ChangeParenteau,Patrick<div>Human activities are causing a global extinction of plants and animals that rivals the five great extinction events over the earth's geologic history. Habitat loss, overharvest, invasive species and pollution have been the principal causes of this "Sixth Extinction." Climate change exacerbates all of these problems and poses even graver threats to global biodiversity. Ocean acidification –global warming's evil twin –threatens major damage to marine ecosystems. The course looks at how domestic laws like the Endangered Species Act of 1973 and international laws such as CITES, the Convention on Biodiversity, and the forestry provisions of the UNFCCC (REDD+) seek to respond to these threats. Guest speakers will help round out the understanding of the richness and complexity of the issues.</div> <div><strong> Method of evaluation: Three commentaries (500 words each) Final Paper (5000 words)</strong></div>2.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bT 3:35 - 5:15pm1248
ENV5365.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1250ENV5365.AClimate Change: The Power of TaxesMilne,Janet<div>Reducing greenhouse gas emissions requires long-term changes in behavior, and in a capitalist society, industry, businesses, and consumers respond to prices. Increases in the cost of greenhouse gases can reduce emissions, and reductions in the price of alternatives to fossil fuels can increase their use. This seminar explores the ways in which tax systems in the United States and elsewhere can send these negative and positive price signals. Addressing issues of theory, policy, politics, and law, the seminar will cover topics such as: carbon taxes and other energy taxes; the relative merits of carbon taxes and a cap-and-trade approach; federal tax incentives for renewable energy, alternative fuel vehicles, and energy conservation; the role of land conservation tax incentives in reducing greenhouse gas emissions; the repeal of tax subsidies for fossil fuels; and the interaction of tax measures and command-and-control regulation. While focusing on climate change, the seminar will provide students with the framework for understanding how and when to use tax measures to address other environmental problems as well.</div> <div> Limited enrollment.</div>2.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bM 3:35 - 5:15pm1250
ENV5380.Ahttp://portal.vermontlaw.edu/Metacatalogs/Lists/Classes/DispForm.aspx?ID=1226ENV5380.AFood Regulation and PolicyBeyranevand,Laurie<div>Concern over the regulation of food originally arose, in large part, because of the work of journalists, such as Upton Sinclair. Sinclair exposed the horrors of food manufacture and processing, in addition to concerns about worker safety. Presently, the United States is experiencing a resurgence in public concern over the safety of our food supply due to biotechnology, pesticide use, unsafe food packaging, additives, poor agency oversight, etc. This course will provide an overview of the field of food regulation, but will also encourage students to challenge our current policies regarding food regulation and consider how to effectively advocate for policy changes. In addition to learning substantive law, students will review FDA guidance, and recent decisions in the field of food regulation.</div> <div><strong> Method of evaluation: Take-home final exam.</strong></div>3.00000000000000GP0|#5035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542;L0|#05035a800-df31-43b2-8eaf-589758e7f542|Fall 2015;GTSet|#ff5002fa-8399-4824-8dd4-231cdb4e3288;GPP|#938af55b-fbb1-40e4-b7f1-59a1714ca81bTR 9:55 - 11:10am1226