Electricity has a bright future as a clean and efficient source of energy.  Significant progress is possible on further improving the efficiency of the electric grid as the US electric ​system is transformed to a smart electric grid. At the center of the evolution of the smart electric grid is the introduction of new technology at the customer meter, as well as the distribution and transmission system level. This technological innovation has required that the road map to a smart electric grid become a partnership of electric utilities and technology companies. Unsurprisingly, the introduction of this new technology has presented new legal, policy and regulatory challenges for state and federal utility regulators, include concerns about customer data privacy.  The federal government has added additional momentum to the technological evolution by awarding $3.4 billion in smart grid investment grants to utilities and other entities as part of the American Recovery and Reinvestment Act. This infusion of federal funding supported two types of investments in smart grid technology—implementation of smart grid technology across utility service territories and demonstration of smart grid technology.

The Smart Grid Research Project utilized case study research to examine: What legal, regulatory and other policy changes can best ensure that Smart Grid implementation in the US improves reliability, enhances consumer value, and meets our clean energy goals? Below are links to all of the case studies that we have completed to date.

      

​Implementation of Smart Grid Technologies in the European Union​​​

An additional research focus of the  IEE's Smart Grid project is developing case studies on implementation of smart grid technologies in the European​ Union.  The Smart Grid Project has focused on policy approaches in Germany, Denmark, Italy and the UK.   Information on the technical, legal, and policy aspects of diverse smart grid projects across the EU will allow us to make interesting and insightful comparisons with smart grid projects in the U.S.   Researching how technologies and policies related to efficiency and demand response, integration of renewables, and electric vehicle infrastructure development can successfully lead to progress on climate change mitigation will give us deeper insight on how to use new technologies to both develop a more efficient electric system, as well as, make progress on reducing 
global greenhouse gas emission.   

 Smart Grid Customer Data Privacy Policy

New digital smart meters like this Elster meter have the ability to collect and store much greater amounts of detailed customer use data.  Significant public concern over the concern that big data threatens the protection of consumer privacy led​ the Smart Grid Project to develop: A Model Privacy Policy for Smart Grid Customers.  This model policy provides a guide for utilities, regulators and consumer advocates to use to protect customers' rights to privacy regarding their electricity use data.  Below are some of the resources that the Smart Grid Project has produced in this area:

Model VLS Smart Grid Privacy Policy

Presentation to the American Public Power Association - November 8, 2011

Empowering Electric Customers: VT Law School Unveils Innovative National Smart Grid Privacy Policy - November 8, 2011 Press Release

A Smarter, Greener Grid​​

In 2014, Professor Kevin Jones and David Zoppo (JD 2014) published their new book with Praeger which examines the five environmental pathways for a smart electric grid to help mitigate climate change.  The book includes research contributions from twenty-one student members of the IEE's Smart Grid Project.  According to John D. McDonald, P.E., Director Technology Strategy and Policy Development for GE Energy Management - Digital Energy, "The success of the 'smarter, grid' depends on technology, industry standards, and policy development.  The application of digital technology, integrated into interoperable solutions that address the business needs​ of electric utilities, is not enough.  The strongest driver for investment is policy, particularly with respect to the environment.  A Smarter, Greener Grid addresses all key drivers very effectively, particularly the nexus of digital technology and the environment."​


​Contact the Smart Grid Team

For more information about our Smart Grid Project you can contact:​

Kevin Jones, PhD
Deputy Director, Institute for Energy and the Environment
Professor of Energy Technology and Policy
Phone: 802-831-1054
Email: kbjones@vermontlaw.edu