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Climate Legacy Initiative


Project Directors and Student Researchers

 

CLI Project Directors

Tracy L. Bach

Burns W. Weston
Climate Legacy Initiative Program Director and Senior Researcher
Visiting Distinguished Professor of International Law and Policy at Vermont Law School and the Bessie Dutton Murray Distinguished Professor of Law Emeritus and Senior Scholar of the UI Center for Human Rights, The University of Iowa.



Tracy L. Bach

Tracy L. Bach
Climate Legacy Initiative Associate Director and Senior Research Fellow
Professor of Law, Vermont Law School

CLI Research Associates

Jonathan C. Carlson

Jonathan C. Carlson
Professor of Law and Senior Associate to the President, The University of Iowa



Michael Dworkin

Michael Dworkin
Director of the Institute for Energy and the Environment and Professor of Law, Vermont Law School



Jerald L. Schnoor

Jerald L. Schnoor
Allen S. Henry Chair in Engineering, The University of Iowa
Professor of Civil and Environmental Engineering, Professor of Occupational and Environmental Health
Co-Director, Center for Global and Regional Environmental Research



N. Bruce Duthu

N. Bruce Duthu
Professor of Law, Vermont Law School



Tseming Yang

Tseming Yang
Professor of Law, Vermont Law School

Director, Vermont Law School – Sun Yat-sen University

Partnership for Environmental Law in China



Pamela J. Stephens

Pamela J. Stephens
Professor of Law, Vermont Law School

CLI Student Assistants

Justin Brown

Justin Brown is a second-year student at Vermont Law School with a keen interest in global warming and a mandatory, encompassing cap and trade regulatory system. He finds climate change fascinating because it bundles together human rights, intergenerational equity, scientific, and economic policy concerns into one cohesive phenomenon. Justin is a Lieutenant-Governor of the ABA (first circuit) and a member of the Vermont Legal Research Group and Negotiations-Client Counseling Board. He graduated from Tufts University, cum laude, in 2005 with a BA in political science.



Betsy Catlin

Betsy Catlin received her BA in philosophy, magna cum laude, from the University of Puget Sound in 2001. As an undergraduate, she worked as a research assistant for Professor Steven Neshyba, an atmospheric chemist, analyzing patterns of down-welling infrared radiance under different types of cloud conditions in an effort to more accurately portray clouds in climate models. Betsy spent the summer of 2006 as a legal intern with the Conservation Law Foundation, in their Montpelier, Vermont office. She was a judicial extern at the Vermont Supreme Court in the chambers of Chief Justice Paul Reiber during the spring of 2007. Most recently, Betsy worked as a summer associate with the Vermont law firm Primmer Piper Eggleston & Cramer, where she worked on a wide variety of legal issues, including work for regulated electric utility clients. This is Betsy's second year as an IEE Research Associate. At VLS, she also works for the Land Use Institute and is a Deans Fellow, teaching the first year legal writing and reasoning course. Betsy's interests are mainly in using energy policy to address climate change issues and in the intersection of land use and energy policy.



Jonathan DeCarlo

Jonathan DeCarlo is a second-year student at Vermont Law School. He graduated from Bates College in 2006 with a degree in philosophy. Jon has a particular interest in environmental ethics and environmental policy. He worked on environmental issues for Penn Environment and the Maine People's Alliance before attending law school. As a firm believer that all generations, present and future, have the right to a clean and healthy environment, he is proud to be a member of the Climate Legacy Initiative.



Jacob LarsonJacob Larson is a third-year student at The University of Iowa College of Law. He is interested in most issues concerning social justice, and serves as a student writer for the Journal of Gender, Race & Justice. Jacob has worked for the Iowa Attorney General's Environmental Law Division, taken environmental law classes, and researched for the CLI since January, 2007. All these experiences help perk his interest in global warming and its legal implications and make him want to establish the legal precedent for intergenerational justice not only in the environmental context, but other social justice contexts as well.



Mave McKinney

Mave McKinney is a second-year student at Vermont Law School. She is concurrently studying to get her Juris Doctor and Master of Environmental Law and Policy degrees at VLS. Mave is a staff member of the Vermont Law Review and a legal research teaching assistant. She received her bachelor's degree in journalism and mass communications from the University of Oklahoma in 2006. Mave hopes to pursue a career in global warming law and is interested in the CLI project because of the cutting-edge perspective that intergenerational justice brings to the climate change forum.



Kara K. Moberg

Kara K. Moberg is a second-year student at The University of Iowa College of Law. She is interested in culture in third-world countries, particularly in Latin America and South America. She has completed internships working with immigration issues and last summer served as a PILI (Public Interest Legal Initiative) intern with Legal Assistance Foundation of Metropolitan Chicago. She currently is serving as a student writer for the Iowa Law Review, president of Iowa Campaign for Human Rights, and vice president of Christian Legal Society. Kara is especially interested in the issue of possible legal remedies for internally displaced persons or persons forced to emigrate due to the consequences of climate change.



Katherine Moll

Katherine Moll is a second-year student at Vermont Law School, where she is pursing joint Juris Doctor and Master of Environmental Law and Policy degrees. She is a staff member of the Vermont Law Review and a constitutional law teaching assistant. She obtained a BS in biology and environmental studies from Alma College, in Alma, Michigan, where she worked with community groups on Brownfield remediation projects and Superfund Sites. Following graduation, she served in the U.S. Peace Corps in Belize, working with an indigenous community-based organization co-managing a protected rainforest conservation and ecotourism. This solidified her goal of working to mitigate global warming damages as she experienced firsthand the effects that unpredictable weather patterns have on subsistence farmers.



Suzanne Pritchett

Suzanne Pritchett is a third-year student at The University of Iowa College of Law. As an undergraduate she majored in religious studies at Grinnell College and lived in India. As a graduate student, she studied global development at Sussex University in England and worked for an international women's human rights organization. Consequently, she has been an active member of both the International Law Society and The University of Iowa Center for Human Rights, as well as a writer and articles editor for the Transnational Law and Contemporary Problems journal. She is drawn to the intergenerational justice aspect of climate change particularly for its ability to affect behavioral change as well its applicability in enforcing fundamental human right standards in other sociopolitical contexts, particularly women's rights.



Christina Switzer

Christina Switzer received a BA in history, cum laude, from Austin College in 2000. As an undergraduate, she spent a year at Queen's University in Belfast, Northern Ireland studying anthropology and archaeology. Christina spent the summer of 2007 interning at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission in the Office of General Counsel, Energy Markets.

This fall Christina will be a part-time intern at the Conservation Law Foundation in their Montpelier, Vermont office. She is also a member of the Vermont Journal of Environmental Law and president of the Negotiation-Client Counseling Board.



Michelle Wheelhouse

Michelle Wheelhouse is a second-year student at The University of Iowa College of Law, where she is a writer on the Journal of Gender, Race and Justice and an active member of both the Equal Justice Foundation and the Organization of Women Law Students and Staff. Prior to law school, Michelle taught middle-school English in Las Vegas, Nevada. As a former educator, she finds it imperative to advocate for, and create, intergenerational justice against the atrocities climate change has caused and will cause in the future.

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